Syracuse Orange forward C.J. Fair (R) drives to the net on Marquette Golden Eagles guard Trent Lockett during the first half in their East Regional NCAA men's basketball game in Washington

2013-2014 Season Preview: The Top 20 Wing Forwards

5 Comments
source:
Andrew Wiggins (AP) and Jabari Parker (AP)

All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. Check back throughout the day, as we’ll be posting three or four preview items every day.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To see the rest of our preview lists, click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here.

Basketball has five positions, but the way that the sport has grown, particularly at the collegiate level, has produced hybrid players, unusual roster makeups and far too many teams with players that don’t fit into a typical positional category. Few teams actually field a traditional starting five, which is why CBT decided to make our positional rankings reflect that.

We will be ranking:

Wing forwards are players that we feel cannot be designated as a member of the back court yet do the majority of their damage away from the basket. A wing player in basketball is one that requires versatility if a player’s to be considered among the elite at the position. Whether they’re a high-level perimeter shooter or a slasher who’s best when attacking off the dribble, the ability to excel in multiple facets of the game is of high importance.

Here’s our list of the 20 best wings entering the 2013-14 season:

1. Andrew Wiggins (Kansas): The Huntington Prep product arrived in Lawrence amidst much fanfare, and whether or not he’s in the spot when the season ends will depend in large part on how he handles the attention. The skill and athleticism are most certainly there, with more than a few scouts pegging Wiggins as the top pick in the 2014 NBA Draft should he enter.

2. Jabari Parker (Duke): Parker was one of the most versatile players in the country coming out of Simeon High in Chicago, as he has the ability to score both inside and out. Given his talent Parker is one of two wings expected to lead the way for the Blue Devils as they look to account for the loss of their top three scorers from a season ago.

3. C.J. Fair (Syracuse): Even with the Orange playing their first season in the ACC, it was Fair who the coaches chose as their preseason ACC Player of the Year. As a junior, the southpaw from Baltimore posted averages of 14.5 points and 6.9 rebounds per game for a team that won 30 games and reached the Final Four for the first time in a decade.

source: Getty Images
Getty Images

4. Rodney Hood (Duke): Hood has yet to play a game in a Duke uniform as he transferred in from Mississippi State. But that season spent practicing is expected to pay dividends for Hood, who was an SEC All-Freshman Team selection in 2011-12 (10.3 ppg, 4.8 rpg, 2.0 apg). And he’s already a trusted leader for Mike Krzyzewski’s squad, as he’s been named a team captain for the upcoming season.

5. Glenn Robinson III (Michigan): The son of the “Big Dog” is poised for a breakout season with the Wolverines having to account for the loss of both Trey Burke and Tim Hardaway Jr. As a freshman Robinson posted averages of 11.0 points and 5.4 rebounds per game, and he has the skill needed to take advantage of the increased offensive opportunities that will comes his way in 2013-14.

6. Cleanthony Early (Wichita State): One reason why many expect the Shockers to win the Missouri Valley and possibly make some more noise nationally is Early, who averaged 13.9 points and 5.4 rebounds per game last season. The 6-foot-8 forward earned all-MVC and Newcomer of the Year honors, and he’s the early favorite to win MVC Player of the Year as a senior.

7. Kyle Anderson (UCLA): The attribute that would best describe Anderson’s game is “versatility,” with the sophomore being one of the options to run the point for Steve Alford’s Bruins. As a freshman Anderson, who spent the majority of his time off the ball due to the presence of Larry Drew II, led the Bruins in rebounding (8.6 rpg) while also averaging 9.7 points and 3.5 assists per game.

8. Sam Dekker (Wisconsin): The Badgers may have lost some key veterans but Dekker, who was one of the Big Ten’s best freshmen last year, is back for his sophomore campaign. Dekker shot 48% from the field in 2012-13, averaging 9.6 points and 3.4 rebounds per game.

9. James Young (Kentucky): For all the talent at John Calipari’s disposal it’s been Young, another of their six McDonald’s All-Americans, whose received the highest amount of praise from observers of the Wildcats’ early practices. Always a good perimeter shooter, Young has the length (6-foot-6) to be a matchup problem for opponents if he attacks the rim with greater regularity.

10. T.J. Warren (N.C. State): With four starters gone from last season’s NCAA tournament team it’s essentially Warren’s show in Raleigh in 2013-14. As a freshman the 6-foot-8 Warren shot 62% from the field, averaging 12.1 points and 4.2 rebounds per game.

source: Getty Images
Getty Images

TEN MORE NAMES TO KNOW

  • 11. Luke Hancock (Louisville): The reigning Final Four MOP is a versatile player who can make things happen both on and off the ball, and his leadership abilities have proven valuable for the Cardinals as well.
  • 12. Will Sheehey (Indiana): Given the amount of talent Indiana lost from last year’s Big Ten champion squad, Sheehey (9.5 ppg, 3.5 rpg) will be expected to do a lot more this season. Sheehey shot 49% from the field as a junior.
  • 13. LaQuinton Ross (Ohio State): Is this the year in which Ross puts it all together? He played very well for the Buckeyes in postseason play, averaging 15 points during the NCAA tournament and hitting the game-winning three to push Ohio State past Arizona in the Sweet 16.
  • 14. Treveon Graham (VCU): For as much attention as the Rams’ “HAVOC” system receives, it should also be noted that in Graham they’ve got one of the nation’s best swingmen. Graham averaged 15.1 points and 5.8 rebounds per game in 2012-13, shooting 45% from the field and 37% from beyond the arc.
  • 15. Dezmine Wells (Maryland): After spending much of last season adjusting to a new program Wells may be poised to take off in 2013-14. The Xavier transfer averaged 13.1 points and 4.9 rebounds per game last season, and he was also second on the team in assists (3.0 apg).
  • 16. JaKarr Sampson (St. John’s): Sampson may be one of the best athletes in the country, and he’ll be a primary scoring option for Steve Lavin’s Red Storm after averaging 14.9 points and 6.6 rebounds per game as a freshman. For his efforts Sampson was named Big East Rookie of the Year.
  • 17. Fuquan Edwin (Seton Hall): Edwin is one of the nation’s most underrated players (the Pirates’ lack of success has had something to do with it), and the hope in South Orange is that he receives more attention in 2013-14. As a junior Edwin posted averages of 16.5 points, 5.8 rebounds and 2.4 steals per game.
  • 18. Damyean Dotson (Oregon): Dotson played very well as a freshman for an Oregon squad that reached the Sweet 16 for the first time in a decade, averaging 11.4 points and 3.5 rebounds per game. Dotson ended the season with six straight double-digit scoring outings.
  • 19. Branden Dawson (Michigan State): Dawson’s dealt with injuries for much of his career, but he played in all 36 games last season and averaged 8.9 points, 5.9 rebounds and 1.6 steals per game. Still a high-level athlete, Dawson’s production will be key if the Spartans are to have a shot at getting to the Final Four.
  • 20. Jabari Bird (California): Losing leading scorer Allen Crabbe is a big deal, but the arrival of Bird is one reason why the folks in Berkeley aren’t panicking. An excellent athlete, Bird earned a spot in the McDonald’s All-America Game and averaged 17.2 points and 6.8 rebounds per game as a senior in high school.

Indiana upsets No. 4 Iowa, moves into first-place tie in Big Ten

Indiana's Troy Williams (5) and Collin Hartman (30) celebrate after Williams made a shot and was fouled during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Iowa, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016, in Bloomington, Ind. Indiana won 85-78. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
1 Comment

Indiana picked off the No. 4 team in the country on Thursday night, beating Iowa in Assembly Hall, 85-78.

It goes without saying that this was a huge win for the Hoosiers. They had just a single top 50 win on their résumé entering the night. They were on the right side of the bubble entering the day, but for a team that just moved into a tie for first place in the Big Ten with the win, they were no where near as safe as you might think.

You read that right.

Indiana is not exactly safe when it comes to their NCAA tournament standing despite, on February 11th, being tied with Iowa and Maryland for first place in the Big Ten.

So yes, adding a top ten win to that profile is incredibly significant.

Having a realistic shot at winning the Big Ten regular season title is incredibly significant.

But more than anything, how this win came to be matters more than anything.

For starters, it came on a night where Yogi Ferrell was off. He hit his first shot and his last shot of the night, but missed all ten field goal attempts in between. He finished with just one assist compared to two turnovers and four fouls. He was bad. And it didn’t matter. For a team that relies as heavily upon a player as Indiana relies upon Yogi, that’s significant.

As is the fact that the Hoosiers were able to win despite blowing a 16-point lead. Remember, Indiana had lost to Penn State on Saturday. Following that up by blowing a huge lead at home in the most important game of the season is the kind of thing that can obliterate a team’s confidence, and with a brutal stretch run — at Michigan State, Nebraska, Purdue, at Illinois, at Iowa, Maryland — getting into a funk now would be a season-killer.

Six Hoosiers scored at least nine points, led by 14 from Ferrell, while it was the play of Thomas Bryant and Troy Williams, grabbing 10 of Indiana’s 19 offensive rebounds, that really made the difference; the Hoosiers scored 26 second-chance points.

As far as Iowa is concerned, the only real problem coming from this loss was their inability to keep Indiana off of the offensive glass. The Hoosiers had 12 offensive rebounds in the first 20 minutes. Iowa had 11 total rebounds. On the season, the Hawkeyes are 225th nationally in defensive rebounding percentage. Indiana gets to the offensive glass as well as anyone, but Fran McCaffery is not going to be happy about their numbers — or effort — when he watches this film.

LATE NIGHT SNACKS: Indiana, California pick up important home wins

Indiana's Collin Hartman (30) and Yogi Ferrell (11) celebrate late in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Iowa, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016, in Bloomington, Ind. Indiana won 85-78. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
AP Photo/Darron Cummings
Leave a comment

GAME OF THE NIGHT: Indiana 85, No. 4 Iowa 78

There’s now a three-way tie atop the Big Ten standings, as the Hoosiers outlasted the Hawkeyes in Bloomington. Yogi Ferrell led five Indiana players in double figures with 14 points, and Tom Crean’s team won this one in large part due to their rebounding (19 offensive rebounds) and accuracy from the foul line. Indiana made 18 of its 21 attempts from the charity stripe, with Iowa going a pedestrian 13-for-23. Jarrod Uthoff scored 24 points and Mike Gesell 17, but those missed opportunities from the foul line proved costly for Fran McCaffery’s team.

IMPORTANT OUTCOMES

California 83, No. 11 Oregon 63: Jabari Bird scored 24 points to lead the way offensively as Cal moved to 15-0 at Haas Pavilion this season. Oregon simply did not have any answers for the Golden Bears, who shot nearly 56 percent from the field and racked up 27 second-chance points and 46 points in the paint. As a result the top seven teams in the Pac-12 are separated by a total of two games. So how does Cal go about ensuring that they don’t have to sweat out Selection Sunday? By doing something that’s proven to be far easier said than done for them this season.

Temple 63, UConn 58: With six minutes remaining UConn held a 12-point lead and appeared poised to pick up a win in Philadelphia. Things didn’t play out that way however, as Temple closed the game on a 21-4 run to pick up a much-needed win for their NCAA tournament hopes and move to 9-3 in the American. Quenton DeCosey scored 23 points and Daniel Dingle 15 for the Owls, who are now 6-0 on the season against the other top teams in the American (UConn, Cincinnati, SMU and Tulsa).

Syracuse 85, Florida State 72: The Orange opened the second half on a 13-1 run, grabbing control of a key game between teams looking to add quality wins to their NCAA tournament résumés. Michael Gbinije scored 22 points and grabbed eight rebounds, and Malachi Richardson added 17, six board, five assists and three steals for the Orange. Devon Bookert led four Seminoles in double figures with 15 points, but FSU shot just 8-for-26 from three against the Syracuse zone.

STARRED

Rokas Gustys, Hofstra: Gustys racked up 25 points and 15 rebounds in Hofstra’s 86-80 win at William & Mary.

Matt Harris, UMass-Lowell: Harris scored 33 points, shooting 10-for-15 from the field, in the RiverHawks’ 108-95 overtime win at Maine.

Jabari Bird, California: Bird scored 24 points, shooting 9-for-14 from the field, in the Golden Bears’ blowout win over No. 11 Oregon.

Nick Emery, BYU: Emery scored 37 points in the Cougars’ 114-89 win at San Francisco, shooting 10-for-12 from three.

STRUGGLED

Chattanooga: The Mocs committed 26 turnovers in their 67-61 loss at Western Carolina.

James McGee, Southern Utah: McGee shot 2-for-10 from the field, scoring six points in the Thunderbirds’ 86-53 loss at Montana.

OTHER NOTABLE RESULTS

  • UMass knocked off VCU 69-63 in Amherst, dropping the Rams a game behind Dayton in the Atlantic 10 standings.
  • Matt Tiby accounted for 24 points and 11 rebounds and Jordan Johnson added 14 points and ten assists as Milwaukee won 93-85 at Oakland.
  • James Madison picked up an important 56-52 win at Charleston, but leading scorer Ron Curry left the game with a knee injury. His status moving forward will be of great importance to the Dukes.
  • Jacksonville fell short in its quest to grab sole possession of first in the A-Sun, as they lost 93-92 at Lipscomb.
  • High Point won at Coastal Carolina, beating the Chanticleers 68-67. Adam Weary led a balanced offensive effort for the Panthers with 13 points.
  • Stony Brook extended its win streak to 17 straight games with a 75-52 win at UMBC. Jameel Warney finished the game with 22 points and seven rebounds.
  • Western Carolina handed Chattanooga its second loss in SoCon play, beating the Mocs 67-61. Torrior Brummitt finished with 16 points and ten rebounds for the Catamounts.
  • Charlotte scored 66 second half points in a 102-73 win over Rice. Mark Price’s 49ers shot especially well from three, connecting on 17 of their 29 attempts.
  • There’a a two-way tie atop the Northeast Conference, as both Saint Francis (PA) and Fairleigh Dickinson picked up wins Thursday night. Wagner, which entered the night tied for first, lost at LIU Brooklyn 82-69.
  • UAB won for the 18th time in their last 19 games but they had to work hard for it, beating Southern Miss 80-77 in double overtime. Chris Cokley accounted for 17 points and 13 rebounds off the bench for the Blazers.
  • Montana State shot an incredible 25-for-43 from beyond the arc in a 101-58 win over Northern Arizona.
  • Montana (10-2) and Weber State (9-2) remain atop the Big Sky standings, as both picked up comfortable home wins Thursday night. While the Grizzlies blew out Southern Utah 86-53, Weber State beat Sacramento State 63-50.
  • Oregon State picked up a 62-50 win at Stanford, a good result for a team in need of more wins as they look to earn an NCAA tournament bid. Also winning in the Pac-12 was Colorado, which avoided a bad loss by beating Washington State 88-81 in double overtime.
  • Gonzaga grabbed sole possession of first in the WCC with a 92-66 win at Portland. They had some help from Pepperdine, which went up to the Bay Area and beat Saint Mary’s 69-63 in Moraga.