2013-2014 CAA Preview: Drexel keeps draggin’ us back in

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Towson Athletics

All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. Check back throughout the day, as we’ll be posting three or four preview items every day.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To see the rest of the Conference Previews we’ve published, click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here.

Realignment has hit the CAA in a weird way. The first top-notch program to bolt the league was Virginia Commonwealth, and they left to improve their basketball options. All this national shuffling has been football-based, but Final Four appearances still count for something. VCU left two years ago, but fellow giant-killer George Mason joins them in the A-10 this season.

Football hasn’t been absent from the radar, by any means. Old Dominion and Georgia State created gridiron programs out of thin air in 2009, and both jumped straight to the BCS big time this season. For a league headquartered in Richmond, the CAA is suddenly experiencing a glaring lack of schools located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The league tournament will be held in Baltimore for the first time this season, perhaps reflecting a new power base in the northern climes.

Up north is definitely where the excitement lives this season. Towson, a perennial doormat in years past, has become a legitimate contender under Pat Skerry, who engineered a record-breaking 17-game turnaround for the Tigers last season. In Skerry’s backyard are his presumptive competitors for the league’s upper echelon – the Philly-tough Drexel Dragons, reigning regular-season champs Northeastern, and a dangerously well-stocked Delaware team. Hofstra, a rebuilding project under new head coach Joe Mihalich, rounds out the CAA’s Yankee contingent.

The southern set isn’t exactly to be dismissed, either. James Madison brought the league’s auto-bid to a Virginia-based program yet again after claiming the tourney title last season, and new member College of Charleston has a well-earned reputation as a mid-major to be reckoned with. The College of William & Mary – an Ivy League-caliber academic institution somewhat out of place in CAA basketball circles – has never been to the Big Dance but has one of the conference’s most exciting players and an opportunity to knock that door down if the chips fall the right way. Wilmington is coming off of an APR nightmare, but should rebuild quickly under a coaching brain trust that features former UNC-Asheville head man Eddie Beidenbach and former Appalachian State boss Houston Fancher under the leadership of Buzz Peterson, who spent four years helming the Tennessee Volunteers once upon a time. The league will regain its north-south equilibrium in 2014, when Elon joins the league.

A betting man would probably choose one of the northern schools to snag this year’s auto-bid, but JMU should be back in the mix once guard Andre Nation finishes serving a 15-game suspension, just in time for conference play. Charleston, under Doug Wojick, may be primed to upset the apple cart as well.

Drexel was the preseason choice last season, and the team struggled to fulfill expectations. Fool me twice, shame on me, but with an all-league type backcourt in place, I like Drexel to come out of the pack and finally grab that brass ring that has eluded Bruiser Flint for so long.


In: College of Charleston (SoCon)
Out: George Mason (A-10), Georgia State (Sun Belt), Old Dominion (C-USA)


Benimon was little more than an afterthought in two seasons at Georgetown, averaging just over a point per game. After sitting out a season at Towson, he was ready to play. Oh boy, was he ready to play. With his new team on a postseason ban based on APR scores, Benimon played like he was leading his team to the Final Four anyway, averaging 17.1 points, 11.2 rebounds and 1.9 blocks per game. The 6-foot-8, 245-lb. wrecking ball earned Player of the Year honors in his conference, and he’ll go into his senior season with a shot to lead the Tigers into the Big Dance.

Anyone want to get in his way? I thought not.


  • Marcus Thornton, William & Mary: Thornton’s boundless energy and 43% deep shooting mark make W&M dangerous.
  • Devon Saddler, Delaware: Saddler was on the All-CAA team with Benimon last season. He’s back for more.
  • Frantz Massenat, Drexel: Massenat is so tough, and so good with the ball in his hands. He’ll look to make good on last season’s promise.
  • Damion Lee, Drexel: Lee battled injuries at times last season. If healthy, he and Chris Fouch can team with Massenat to wreck this league.


1. Drexel
2. Northeastern
3. Towson
4. James Madison
5. Delaware
6. Charleston
7. William & Mary
8. Hofstra
9. Wilmington

No. 2 Duke goes inside to defeat No. 11 Syracuse

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OMAHA, Neb. — Second-seeded Duke made just 5 of its 26 3-point attempts against No. 11 Syracuse on Friday in the two ACC programs’ Sweet 16 matchup.

So the Blue Devils just went inside.

Marvin Bagley III and Wendel Carter, Jr. both had big games to help the Blue Devils outlast the Orange, 69-65, to put themselves in the Elite Eight on Sunday against top-seeded Kansas.

While Duke couldn’t beat the zone that took Syracuse from the First Four to the second weekend with its outside shooting, its two big underclassmen provided plenty of production. Bagley had 22 points and eight rebounds while Carter added 14 points and 12 boards.

Tyus Battle had 19 points to lead the Orange.

Syracuse shot 53.8 percent from the floor in the second half while Duke shot 36.4 percent, but it wasn’t enough to overcome the Orange’s 16 turnovers or Duke’s 17 second-chance points.

Grayson Allen had 15 points and eight assists for Duke. The Blue Devils had 32 points in the paint.


VIDEO: Allen-to-Bagley oop beats the Syracuse zone

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Usually, you’ve got to shoot a team out of a zone.

Duke might be able to dunk Syracuse out of it.

Grayson Allen and Marvin Bagley connected for a beautiful alley-oop Friday in the second half of the Blue Devils’ Sweet 16 contest against the Orange.

That will work as a zone-buster.

VIDEO: Duke slaps the floor on defense…while playing zone

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Slapping the floor on defense has its advocates and its detractors.

Some applaud the old-school, hard-nosed nature of putting hand to floor. For others, its a bit corny.

What everyone agrees on is that you don’t drop a floor slap if you’re playing zone.

Unless you’re Duke, apparently.

Presumably, the whole point of slapping the floor is to psyche yourself and intimidate your opponent with aggressive man-to-man defense. Not sit-back-and-guard-this-spot-whether-there’s-a-guy-there-or-not defense.

C’mon, Duke. You’re making it too easy for your haters.


Late run sparks Villanova past West Virginia, into Elite Eight

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BOSTON — It is always just a matter of time before the avalanche comes.

And when it does, you better hope that lead you have is big enough to withstand what’s coming.

For No. 5-seed West Virginia, it was not. With 11 minutes left on Friday night in Boston’s TD Garden, the Mountaineers led 60-54 and had seemingly wrestled control of the game from the No. 1-seed in the East Region. Less than five minutes later, after the Wildcats hit four of their next five threes, Villanova had taken a 76-66 lead by going on a 22-6 run, and West Virginia was never able to recover.

Jalen Brunson led the way for the top-seeded Wildcats with 27 points and four assists while Omari Spellman finished with 18 points, eight boards and three blocks and Mikal Bridges chipped in with 16 points despite playing relatively poorly — by his standards — on Friday.

With a 90-78 win, Villanova advanced to the Elite Eight and a date with the winner of tonight’s game No. 2 Purdue-No. 3 Texas Tech.

That’s the way that it works with this Villanova team. Armed with the most potent, high-volume three-point shooting attack in college basketball — maybe in the history of college basketball — fans of their opponents are just waiting for the inevitable.

On Friday night, Villanova shot 13-for-24 from three, which is damned-impressive and exactly what we expect at the same time.

But what changed the game was that 22-6 run that eventually turned into a 29-11 surge.

And it all started with a free throw.

Brunson drew a foul on Lamont West — a common theme for the Wildcats in the second half — and got to the foul line with 10:58 left on the clock. After he missed the second free throw, Spellman knocked the rebound out of bounds off of Esa Ahmad. Brunson against drew a foul, this time earning an and-one. A missed jumper from Beetle Bolden led to two Eric Paschall free throws before Jalen Brunson someone managed to find Mikal Bridges for a three that gave the Wildcats the lead and led to what might have been the most important sequence of the game.

Spellman spiked a Bolden shot straight down into the floor and then corralled the loose ball. He found Phil Booth with an outlet, and after a missed layup, Spellman beat everyone else down the floor for a massive tip-dunk that set off the Villanova-favored crowd:

“We expect that of him,” Brunson said of Spellman. “He’s supposed to play at a high level every game.”

After that stretch, Villanova threw it into cruise control. That West Virginia defense that had bothered them so much for the first 30 minutes of the game seemed to be nothing more than a mild annoyance, a little brother batting at the ball as the Wildcats pulled away. First it was Donte Divincenzo — who was flat-out bad, the player that was most-victimized by West Virginia’s pressure — hitting a three to push the lead to six. Then after two West Virginia free throws, Brunson dribbled Jevon Carter into the post before kicking the ball out to Spellman for a three. Paschall would dunk on Sagaba Konate the next time the Wildcats had the ball before Brunson capped the run by drilling a step-back three in the face of Carter.

Once that happened, everyone knew the end result was inevitable.

“We got used to the physicality, we got used to the aggressiveness, and we were executing better,” head coach Jay Wright said. “We thought that was going to be the case. You just can’t simulate that, you know. You got to just get in that game and feel it.”

“I have so much respect for the way West Virginia plays, how physical, how relentless they play, how mentally tough they are. Really, you’ve got guys, they don’t talk any junk. A little with Konate and Omari got into it a little bit, no biggie, but the whole game, they don’t say anything. They just come at you physically, aggressively, and mentally tough. So if you’re not better in those areas, they’re going to get you. And to see our guys come out, more to be able to compete with them physically and mentally, it was really impressive to me.”

Me, too.

VIDEO: Omari Spellman, Eric Paschall with mammoth dunks for Villanova

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Villanova took the lead on West Virginia and turned the tide of momentum with a pair of emphatic dunks in transition.

It started with Omari Spellman, who had an unbelievable sequence, spiking a shot into the floor before throwing down a put-back dunk all over a defender:

A couple of possessions later, Eric Paschall finally did the impossible.

He dunked on Sagaba Konate:

I am having way too much fun at this game.