2013-2014 CAA Preview: Drexel keeps draggin’ us back in

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Towson Athletics

All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. Check back throughout the day, as we’ll be posting three or four preview items every day.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To see the rest of the Conference Previews we’ve published, click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here.

Realignment has hit the CAA in a weird way. The first top-notch program to bolt the league was Virginia Commonwealth, and they left to improve their basketball options. All this national shuffling has been football-based, but Final Four appearances still count for something. VCU left two years ago, but fellow giant-killer George Mason joins them in the A-10 this season.

Football hasn’t been absent from the radar, by any means. Old Dominion and Georgia State created gridiron programs out of thin air in 2009, and both jumped straight to the BCS big time this season. For a league headquartered in Richmond, the CAA is suddenly experiencing a glaring lack of schools located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The league tournament will be held in Baltimore for the first time this season, perhaps reflecting a new power base in the northern climes.

Up north is definitely where the excitement lives this season. Towson, a perennial doormat in years past, has become a legitimate contender under Pat Skerry, who engineered a record-breaking 17-game turnaround for the Tigers last season. In Skerry’s backyard are his presumptive competitors for the league’s upper echelon – the Philly-tough Drexel Dragons, reigning regular-season champs Northeastern, and a dangerously well-stocked Delaware team. Hofstra, a rebuilding project under new head coach Joe Mihalich, rounds out the CAA’s Yankee contingent.

The southern set isn’t exactly to be dismissed, either. James Madison brought the league’s auto-bid to a Virginia-based program yet again after claiming the tourney title last season, and new member College of Charleston has a well-earned reputation as a mid-major to be reckoned with. The College of William & Mary – an Ivy League-caliber academic institution somewhat out of place in CAA basketball circles – has never been to the Big Dance but has one of the conference’s most exciting players and an opportunity to knock that door down if the chips fall the right way. Wilmington is coming off of an APR nightmare, but should rebuild quickly under a coaching brain trust that features former UNC-Asheville head man Eddie Beidenbach and former Appalachian State boss Houston Fancher under the leadership of Buzz Peterson, who spent four years helming the Tennessee Volunteers once upon a time. The league will regain its north-south equilibrium in 2014, when Elon joins the league.

A betting man would probably choose one of the northern schools to snag this year’s auto-bid, but JMU should be back in the mix once guard Andre Nation finishes serving a 15-game suspension, just in time for conference play. Charleston, under Doug Wojick, may be primed to upset the apple cart as well.

Drexel was the preseason choice last season, and the team struggled to fulfill expectations. Fool me twice, shame on me, but with an all-league type backcourt in place, I like Drexel to come out of the pack and finally grab that brass ring that has eluded Bruiser Flint for so long.

REALIGNMENT MOVES

In: College of Charleston (SoCon)
Out: George Mason (A-10), Georgia State (Sun Belt), Old Dominion (C-USA)

PRESEASON CAA PLAYER OF THE YEAR: Jerrelle Benimon, Towson

Benimon was little more than an afterthought in two seasons at Georgetown, averaging just over a point per game. After sitting out a season at Towson, he was ready to play. Oh boy, was he ready to play. With his new team on a postseason ban based on APR scores, Benimon played like he was leading his team to the Final Four anyway, averaging 17.1 points, 11.2 rebounds and 1.9 blocks per game. The 6-foot-8, 245-lb. wrecking ball earned Player of the Year honors in his conference, and he’ll go into his senior season with a shot to lead the Tigers into the Big Dance.

Anyone want to get in his way? I thought not.

FOUR MORE NAMES TO KNOW:

  • Marcus Thornton, William & Mary: Thornton’s boundless energy and 43% deep shooting mark make W&M dangerous.
  • Devon Saddler, Delaware: Saddler was on the All-CAA team with Benimon last season. He’s back for more.
  • Frantz Massenat, Drexel: Massenat is so tough, and so good with the ball in his hands. He’ll look to make good on last season’s promise.
  • Damion Lee, Drexel: Lee battled injuries at times last season. If healthy, he and Chris Fouch can team with Massenat to wreck this league.

ONE TWITTER FEED TO FOLLOW: @caahoops

PREDICTED FINISH
1. Drexel
2. Northeastern
3. Towson
4. James Madison
5. Delaware
6. Charleston
7. William & Mary
8. Hofstra
9. Wilmington

South Carolina fans raise money to send “Gamecock Jesus” to Final Four

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South Carolina fans are sending one of their most recognizable compatriots to represent them this weekend.

Gamecock Jesus is heading to the Final Four.

South Carolina super fan Carlton Thompson is following the Gamecocks to Glendale as his fellow fans have raised over $7,500 to send the man known as “Gamecock Jesus” to Arizona for the team’s Final Four meeting with Gonzaga on Saturday night.

Thompson’s long hair, beard and presence at South Carolina games, even in lean times, earned him his nickname and apparently a following fervent enough to foot the bill for quite the trip.

“I’ve always dreamed it would be like this,” Thompson said last week about fan support at Gamecock games to the Post and Courier. “For years and years, it was so sparse with the crowds at the games. But once they started winning, the crowds started coming.”

Thompson is a 63-year-old VA hospital nurse, and has been attending South Carolina games for nearly 50 years.

Maryland’s Melo Trimble declares for the NBA Draft

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Melo Trimble’s career as a Maryland Terrapin is coming to an end. The junior guard is declaring for the NBA Draft and will sign with an agent.

“I am confident and excited to pursue an opportunity to play in the NBA,” Trimble said in a release. “I am proud of what my teammates and I were able to accomplish these past three seasons at Maryland. I developed many great relationships and friendships and together we able to create some very special moments for Maryland basketball. I want to thank Coach Turgeon for all of his support. He always believed in me. He challenged me and really helped in the development of my overall game. I am a more complete basketball player because of Coach Turgeon and the coaching staff. To stay at home and attend the University of Maryland is the best decision that I ever made and it was truly special to play in front of my family, friends and our amazing fans. Maryland will always be home.”

There was no better winner in college basketball the last three years than Melo. He changed the trajectory of Mark Turgeon’s program, winning 79 games in three years and ending his career 30-8 in games decided by six points or less. As a junior, Trimble and the Terps earned a No. 6 seed to the NCAA tournament, but they lost in the first round to Xavier. It was the only time in Trimble’s career that he didn’t reach the Sweet 16.

“Melo Trimble is a winner,” Mark Turgeon said on twitter. “Humble, hard-working, dedicated. Words can’t express what he’s done for our program. Always #StayMelo!”

Final Four Preview: No. 1 North Carolina vs. No. 3 Oregon

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The nightcap on Saturday should be a thrilling matchup between the two big dogs left in the tournament.

It’s something of a weird matchup: North Carolina wants to play fast but pounds the ball inside while Oregon is going to try and keep the tempo at a reasonable pace.

Here’s a look at the second game at this year’s Final Four:

WHEN: Saturday April 1st, 8:49 p.m.

BETTING LINE: North Carolina (-5)

THREE KEY MATCHUPS

1. Does North Carolina make Oregon go big or will Oregon force UNC to play small?: Without Chris Boucher available, Oregon has gone full-time to a small-ball look, playing Dillon Brooks at the four. North Carolina is never, ever going to play small-ball, as Roy Williams is one of the last remaining coaches that still plays two big men almost regardless of the situation. It’s part of the reason that the Tar Heels are the nation’s best offensive rebounding team.

Something is going to have to give. Maybe it’s Isaiah Hicks, the guy that will likely be tasked with chasing around Brooks for UNC and who has developed quite the habit of getting into foul trouble. Maybe Dana Altman will be forced to play Kavell Bigby-Williams and Jordan Bell together to keep the Tar Heels for controlling the paint. Hell, Bell could very well end up looking like Ben Wallace once again and control the paint all on his own.

However it plays out, I can see this matchup being what changes things one way or the other.

2. How do the Tar Heels deal with Oregon’s switching defenses?: The Ducks used a number of different looks against Kansas to take the Jayhawks out of a rhythm offensively. They played some man and they played some matchup zone, and it helped keep Josh Jackson and Devonte’ Graham from finding any kind of a rhythm on the perimeter. I don’t think it’s a hot take to say that more than anything, it was Kansas missing shots they normally make that cost them in the second half, and Oregon’s ability to change defenses and keep them off balance played a major role in that.

So how does North Carolina deal with those different looks? They’re fall less reliant on the three ball than Kansas is, and their size might be able to nullify Bell’s presence on the interior. It will also be interesting to see how the Ducks deal with Justin Jackson on that end, as they don’t really have a player on the roster than can handle his height (6-foot-8), ability to put the ball on the floor and shooting touch.

3. Is Joel Berry II or Tyler Dorsey better?: Justin Jackson is North Carolina’s best player and was deservedly named an all-american for the Tar Heels this season, but North Carolina goes as Joel Berry II goes. He rolled his ankle in UNC’s first round win over Texas Southern and shot 3-for-21 in two games during the first weekend, one of which was a near-upset at the hands of Arkansas. When he was back near 100 percent, he had 26 points on 8-for-13 shooting in a beatdown of No. 4 seed Butler in the Sweet 16.

Berry has a favorable matchup in the back court on Saturday, likely drawing freshman point guard Payton Pritchard when Oregon goes man-t0-man, and if he’s healthy, he should be able to take advantage of that. The problem? Berry rolled his other ankle against Kentucky on Sunday. He’ll have six days to get back to being himself, because the Tar Heels are going to need him.

Along those same lines, Brooks has been Oregon’s best player for two years, but Tyler Dorsey is playing as well as anyone in the country right now. When he’s putting up 24 points a night, Oregon is a different — a better — team. I expect that he’ll have to deal with Theo Pinson, who is UNC’s best perimeter defender and, at 6-foot-6, will have a size advantage on Dorsey.

Odds are pretty good at this point that one of those two is going to have a big game.

(Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

THE BEST STORY LINE: Everything about this North Carolina run is fascinating, so take your pick here:

  • The Tar Heels, just a year removed from a brutal, heart-breaking, soul-crushing loss at the buzzer to Villanova are back in the Final Four as the favorite to win the national title.
  • For the second straight year, the Tar Heels are in the Final Four with the weight of an NCAA investigation looming over them. The NCAA’s ruling on the academic scandal involving the athletic department keeps getting pushed back, which means that we’ll be hearing from plenty of people that UNC shouldn’t even be allowed to be eligible for this tournament. Trust me. It’ll be a thing.
  • If North Carolina does win, where does Roy Williams rank among the greatest coaches of all-time? He’ll be one of just six with three national titles.

CBT PREDICTION: North Carolina (-5)

Final Four Preview: No. 1 Gonzaga vs. No. 7 South Carolina

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The first game of this weekend’s Final Four will feature the two outsiders that have crashed the final weekend of the college basketball season: No. 1 seed Gonzaga and No. 7 seed South Carolina. 

This is the first Final Four for both Frank Martin and Mark Few, meaning one of the two will be playing for a national title on Monday night.

Here is everything you need to know about the Final Four opener:

WHEN: Saturday April 1st, 6:09 p.m.

BETTING LINE: Gonzaga (-6.5)

THREE KEY MATCHUPS

1. Who checks Sindarius Thornwell?: Thornwell has been the best player in the NCAA tournament to date, and it’s really not all that close. He’s not only the leading scorer in the NCAA tournament to date at 25.7 points, but he’s also been a lockdown defender for the Gamecocks.

But the reason Thornwell is going to be such a problem for Gonzaga is ability on the offensive end of the floor. At 6-foot-5 with long arms and the physicality of a nose tackle, Thornwell can bully guards in the paint. But you can’t guard him with a bigger defender because he is, after all, a guard. He’ll blow by them or shoot a three over them when given space.

Gonzaga doesn’t really have an answer for a guy like that. None of their guards are taller than 6-foot-4. Few put Johnathan Williams III on Trevon Bluiett in the Elite 8 and he slowed down the Xavier star, but Xavier trots out a small-ball line with Bluiett at the four. Thornwell will, at times, play the four for South Carolina, but the Gamecocks start two bigs. The easy answer is to double Thornwell on the catch, as South Carolina’s bigs, Chris Silva and Maik Kotsar, are non-shooters, which is why I expect South Carolina will eventually be forced to play small.

2. Can Gonzaga’s guards do anything against that South Carolina defense?: South Carolina and West Virginia play different defenses — WVU presses 94 feet while South Carolina plays half-court man-to-man or a 2-3 zone — but the point or their defenses are essentially the same: They want to force you out of the sets you want to run and make your playmakers try to beat their defenders one-on-one.

And the Mountaineers were totally successful. Nigel Williams-Goss was awful — 2-for-10 shooting five turnovers — and Josh Perkins was invisible, and the game became a rugby match, which is exactly how WVU and SC want to play. Offensively, Gonzaga is a similar team to Baylor in the sense that their guards aren’t great at creating off the dribble against players that are more physical and more athletic than them and they are at their best when they run offense through the post.

Baylor’s guards couldn’t do anything against South Carolina, and they lost by 20. Gonzaga’s guards are significantly better — Williams-Goss is an All-American — but if they struggle the way they did against West Virginia, Gonzaga might be in trouble.

3. Who wins the battle of the front courts?: Like I said earlier, Gonzaga’s offense is at its best when they are getting the rock to Przemek Karnowski and Johnathan Williams III in the post. As tough as South Carolina’s front court is, they are going to be at a serious size disadvantage against Mount Poland and JW3, and that’s to say nothing of Zach Collins, a McDonald’s All-American and a potential one-and-done prospect. If Gonzaga can force South Carolina to play big — with Thornwell at the three instead of at the four — they’ll have a much better shot at winning this game.

(Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

THE BEST STORY LINE: Both of these teams are programs that probably shouldn’t be in the Final Four.

And I don’t mean that as an insult.

Gonzaga, 25 years ago, was one of the worst programs in the WCC, but they’ve managed to hold on to a potential Hall of Famer in Mark Few for 18 years, and it’s paid off. They’re now a top 15 college basketball program in the Final Four. And South Carolina is a place with almost no basketball history to speak of. This is their fifth NCAA Tournament appearance since 1974. Prior to their upset of Duke in the second round of the tournament, South Carolina had never won back-to-back NCAA tournament games.

It doesn’t matter who wins.

It’s incredible that one of these two teams will be playing for a national title on Monday night.

CBT PREDICTION: I like South Carolina (+6.5). I don’t know if the Gamecocks can win this game, but I do think that they will be able to keep it close in a low-scoring game as Sindarius Thornwell as another big game and their defense keeps them in the mix.

Report: Referee that worked Kentucky’s Elite 8 loss receives death threats

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Yesterday, we told you about the Kentucky fans that were flooding the FaceBook page of a referee with negative — and obviously fake — reviews and comments, torpedoing his company’s star rating on the site.

As our Travis Hines wrote, “What could be considered a silly bit of online pranking by a small minority suddenly turns into an avalanche of nastiness that could do real damage to someone’s life, business and family, given the importance of social media for companies in 2017. It becomes cruel when it reaches a level like this.”

This story took a darker turn on Wednesday morning, as ESPN reporting that the referee has received harassing phone calls at both his home and his business while also receiving death threats.

From ESPN:

Sources said the phones at Higgins’ home and business, also known as Rooferees, have been “ringing off the hook” since the game, with angry Kentucky fans calling to complain and some even going so far as to make death threats.

Come on, people.

All this because you didn’t like the calls a ref made in a game where the 18-year olds who play basketball in your favorite school’s jersey lost?

The overwhelming majority of Big Blue Nation are good folks that love their ‘Cats and own too many articles of clothing that are Kentucky blue. But as with every fan base, the vocal minority of idiots ruins the fun for everyone.