2013-14 Season Preview: 10 key assistant coaching hires

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Yanni Hufnagel (Harvard Athletics)

All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. Check back throughout the day, as we’ll be posting three or four preview items every day.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To see the rest of our preview lists, click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here..

Head coaches and players get all of the headlines, but a good assistant coaching staff can help a program significantly, either on the recruiting trail or on the sidelines — or in some cases, both. Each offseason sees a number of assistant coaches moving up and down the coaching ladder, and here are 10 of the key assistant coaching hires this offseason.

Tony Bland, USC: Regarded as one of the best recruiters on the West Coast, USC and new coach Andy Enfield hired Bland away from San Diego State in April. Bland spent the last two seasons as an assistant coach at his alma mater of San Diego State, where he helped the Aztecs on the recruiting trail by helping land Skylar Spencer and Winston Shepard. USC has already landed prized California point guard Jordan McLaughlin in the 2014 class thanks in part to Bland.

Steve Forbes, Wichita State: Forbes returns to the Division I ranks after two years as the head coach of Junior College power Northwest Florida State and should help the Shockers continue to replenish their roster from the JuCo ranks. Forbes previously coached under Bruce Pearl as an assistant coach at Tennessee and was the first member of Pearl’s staff to return to the NCAA after a one-year show-clause penalty after the fallout from Pearl’s scandal involving the barbecue with Aaron Craft. Forbes has also been an assistant at Illinois State, Louisiana Tech and Texas A&M and coached the top junior college player in the country last season in current Louisville guard Chris Jones.

Tavaras Hardy, Georgetown: After spending seven seasons at his alma mater of Northwestern under Bill Carmody, Hardy has already made a major splash under John Thompson III’s staff at Georgetown by continuing to harvest players from the fertile recruiting ground of Chicago and helping the Hoyas land the (former) Whitney Young duo of L.J. Peak and Paul White. Hardy also helped land notable players at Northwestern including John Shurna, Drew Crawford and JerShon Cobb.

Jerrance Howard, Kansas: The Jayhawks landed a monster recruiter in Howard and it has helped them in their pursuit of the two prized Chicago big men recruits in the 2014 class: Cliff Alexander and Jahlil Okafor. Kansas remains in strong position for both Alexander and Okafor as Howard got to know the duo during his years as an assistant coach at Illinois.  Last season in his only year at SMU, Howard helped Larry Brown land former Illinois transfer Crandall Head as well as Chicago-area products Sterling Brown and Ben Moore.

Yanni Hufnagel, Vanderbilt: A young and energetic recruiter that has already recruited at a high level for a high-academic institution in Harvard, Hufnagel joins Kevin Stallings’ staff after four years with the Crimson. Vanderbilt has already landed three class of 2014 guards in September in Wade Baldwin, Matthew Fisher-Davis, and Riley LaChance thanks in-part to Hufnagel’s recruiting efforts.

Justin Hutson, San Diego State: The Aztecs will welcome Hutson back with open arms after their former star assistant coach spent the last two seasons as Dave Rice’s associate head coach at UNLV. Hutson helped the Aztecs recruit Kawhi Leonard and Chase Tapley and has already helped San Diego State land 2014 point guard Kevin Zabo.

Korey McCray, LSU: After a two-season stint at UCLA, McCray joined LSU and Johnny Jones’ staff and is noted as a strong recruiter with ties to the Atlanta area. McCray is a former CEO and head coach for the Atlanta Celtics AAU program — which was co-founded by his father Karl — and those ties helped UCLA land Jordan Adams and Tony Parker. Now that McCray is even closer to Atlanta, those regional connections should help the Tigers as well.

T.J. Otzelberger, Washington: Washington’s new recruiting coordinator comes to the Huskies after seven seasons as an assistant at Iowa State. Otzelberger also helped with opponent scouting reports and game planning during the last two seasons at Iowa State, where he was the program’s associate head coach since 2010.

Patrick Sellers, Creighton: The Bluejays move to the Big East meant they needed a noted Big East recruiting presence, which they got with the hiring of Sellers, a former assistant at UConn and Hofstra. Sellers coached under Jim Calhoun from 2004 through 2010 and helped the Huskies land Jeremy Lamb, Shabazz Napier, Tyler Olander, and Roscoe Smith to the 2010-11 national title team. Sellers gives Creighton immediate Big East credibility on the recruiting trail.

Todd Simon, UNLV: The former coach at Findlay Prep has been with the prep juggernaut since its inception in 2006 and has helped the program with six McDonald’s All-Americans and the No. 1 pick in the 2012 NBA Draft, Anthony Bennett. Simon recruited well for Findlay Prep’s program both in the United States and internationally and should bolster the Runnin’ Rebels already superb efforts in that department.

NCAA: Former USF assistant provided extra benefits, lied to NCAA investigators

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The NCAA has alleged that former South Florida assistant coach Oliver Antigua provided roughly $500 in impermissible benefits and initially lied to NCAA investigators about it, according to the Tampa Bay Times, who obtained the NCAA’s summary disposition report.

Oliver Antigua is the younger brother of Orlando Antigua, who was the head coach at USF until he was fired in January. Now an assistant on Brad Underwood’s staff at Oklahoma State, Orlando was not alleged to have committed an NCAA violation in the report.

Oliver is alleged to have provided the extra benefits to two student-athletes while they were being tutored by the sister-in-law of Gerald Gillion, a special assistant to Orlando who resigned last fall, four months after Oliver did. USF has already self-imposed a $5,000 and reduced their scholarships from 13 to 12, according to the report.

“The University of South Florida and the NCAA continue to work together to resolve the inquiry into violations of NCAA bylaws and university standards by a USF intercollegiate athletic program,” according to a statement released by the school. “USF anticipates having a final resolution with the NCAA sometime this fall. Until the process concludes and the matter is fully resolved, USF cannot provide further comment.”

Villanova lands four-star 2018 guard

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Villanova added its first recruit in the Class of 2018 on Wednesday night.

Jay Wright and his staff landed a verbal commitment from Paul VI Catholic High School’s Brandon Slater, a four-star guard by Rivals as the No. 42 overall prospect in the rising senior class.

The 6-foot-5 Slater announced his decision via Twitter.

Slater, according to Jeff Borzello of ESPN, picked the Wildcats over Maryland, Miami, South Carolina, and Virginia.

He is currently playing the Nike EYBL with Team Takeover, the same grassroots program that produced current Villanova guard Phil Booth.

Comic-Con forces Providence to play at Alumni Hall for home opener

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Providence will play its first game at Alumni Hall, the on-campus facility, for the first time in 35 years this fall.

The Friars unveiled their 2017-18 non-conference schedule on Thursday afternoon. The team’s home opener will play either Houston Baptist or Belmont in Mullaney Gym inside Alumni Hall.

According to Kevin McNamara of the Providence Journal, the reason for that is a schedule conflict at Providence’s home arena, the Dunkin’ Donuts Center, in downtown Providence. A Comic-Con convention is scheduled Nov. 10-12. As McNamara notes, it’s a busy part of the season for The Dunk. The arena also is home to the Providence Bruins, the American Hockey League affiliate of the Boston Bruins, and by mid-November, their season is in full swing.

The Friars haven’t played at Alumni Hall since 1972, the same year the Dunkin’ Donuts Center was opened. In the three decades since Providence last played a regular season game there, the facility has gone under necessary renovations, as you could imagine. Even with added seats, Mullaney Gym can host a maximum of 1,549. That’s a fraction of what The Dunk’s capacity of 12,400.

Providence will return to its downtown home on Nov. 13, hosting Minnesota as part of the Gavitt Games. The Golden Gophers will likely be a top-20 team to open the season. The Friars, who bring back every notable player from last year’s NCAA Tournament team, is a fringe top-25 team.

Jalen Coleman-Lands to transfer out of Illinois

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The already-thin Illinois roster got thinner on Thursday afternoon.

Evan Daniels of Scout.com reported that sophomore guard Jalen Coleman-Lands has requested and received his release from the program. He will have to sit out next season but will have two years of eligibility remaining.

Coleman-Lands was a top-40 recruit in the Class of 2015, according to Rivals. He becomes the second player from that recruiting class this month to exit the school. Reserve guard D.J. Williams elected to transfer on May 8. With Jeremiah Tilmon and Javon Pickett, two incoming recruits, both previously reopened their recruitments following John Groce’s firing.

Even with the addition of Wright State graduate transfer Mark Alstork, who officially joined the Fighting Illini on Wednesday, Illinois is left with only nine scholarship players as of right now.

Coleman-Lands’ production dipped from his freshman campaign, ending the 2016-17 season averaging 8.0 points and 2.3 rebounds per game, shooting 38 percent from three.

One destination that will likely be rumored will be nearby DePaul. Coleman-Lands played for new DePaul assistant coach Shane Heirman at prep school powerhouse La Lumiere School. Heriman quickly tapped into that prep pipeline, helping secure a commitment from La Lumiere from five-star 2019 point guard Tyger Campbell earlier this month.

Coleman-Lands had taken official visits to Notre Dame and UNLV before committing to the Illini in September 2014.

North Carolina releases response to latest NCAA Notice of Allegations

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North Carolina is still trying to convince the NCAA that their investigation into the paper classes given by the university’s African-American Studies Department is not, in fact, an NCAA matter.

On Thursday afternoon, the University released their response to the NCAA’s third iteration of the Notice of Allegations, and the core argument in that response is that the school’s “inadequate academic oversight” does not fall under the jurisdiction of the NCAA’s bylaws. In other words, North Carolina is arguing that a rogue professor creating fake classes is not an NCAA issue. It’s a school issue.

What’s more, North Carolina is also arguing that athletes taking these classes should not be classified as an extra benefit because they were available to the entire student body.

“No special arrangements were made for student-athletes in violation of NCAA extra-benefit legislation,” the response reads. “Student-athletes were not treated differently than other students who took the Courses.”

“The public narrative for the last six years, popularized by media accounts, is that Department of Athletics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill took advantage of ‘fake classes’ in the Department of African and African-American Studies to keep student-athletes eligible. That narrative is wrong and contradicted by the facts in the record.”

The NCAA’s allegations center around the idea that UNC’s athletes, most notably members of the football and men’s and women’s basketball teams, were guided to the fake classes within that department in order to keep their GPAs high enough to remain eligible. The classes in question had a disproportionate percentage of athletes.

A hearing in front of the Committee on Infractions is expected to take place at some point this summer.