Why’s Maryland freshman Roddy Peters wearing No. 2? Let Juan Dixon explain


There’s no doubt that Juan Dixon is one of the greatest players in the history of Maryland basketball. The Baltimore native led the Terps to two Final Four appearances and their lone national title in 2002, doing so while wearing the number 3. But even with this being the case, there seems to be a debate regarding whether or not Terps who have followed Dixon should be allowed to wear the number.

Maryland freshman Roddy Peters was originally expected to wear Dixon’s number this season, with the former Terrapin initially giving his approval when asked by head coach Mark Turgeon. But Dixon had a change of heart after discussing the matter with friends and family, and as a result Peters will be wearing number 2 instead.

Dixon, who was “caught off guard” when contacted by Turgeon, discussed why he changed his mind in a story written by Don Markus of the Baltimore Sun:

“The more I thought about the more I talked about with my family and closest friends who were at my house at that particular time, I started having second thoughts and I called him back,” Dixon said in an interview with the Baltimore Sun on Thursday. “I said ‘Coach, that number is a lot bigger than Juan Dixon the individual. That number represents history. That represents the team, it represents so many more things. It’s sentimental to the University of Maryland and to the fans.’ That was my whole thought process in calling back and saying I had change of heart. I knew nothing about him wearing it or about him idolizing me or wearing for his mom and sisters.”

According to Dixon, former Maryland head coach Gary Williams had an “unwritten rule” that no player would wear the number because of the guard’s impact on the program. But the school, like more than a few college programs, chooses to merely honor great players as opposed to retiring their jersey number. The reason is simple: there’s a concern about the possibility of running out of numbers, with college rules prohibiting the use of any number that includes a 6, 7, 8 or 9.

Maryland’s had some great players, and as noted in Markus’ story numbers made famous by players such as John Lucas (15; Johnny Rhodes wore it in the mid-90s), Joe Smith (32; currently worn by Dez Wells) and others haven’t received the same treatment. Would Maryland be better served to retire the numbers of their most famous players (Dixon mentioned the No. 34 worn by Len Bias as another that shouldn’t be worn by future players)? Or should they continue on the current track of honoring the player but not retiring the number?

This will be an interesting situation to keep an eye on, with fans and former players likely having no shortage of opinions on the matter.

VIDEO: UMass Lowell game delayed by shattered backboard

Pat Duquette
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UMass Lowell’s game with Wheelock College was delayed for a little over an hour on Tuesday afternoon after a dunk attempt from Dontavius Smith broke the backboard.

The game resumed and is currently in the second half. Here’s the video of Smith shattering the glass after he took flight.

No. 13 Indiana bounces back with 83-73 win over St. John’s

Troy Williams
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LAHAINA, Hawaii (AP) Yogi Ferrell had 22 points and seven assists to lead No. 13 Indiana to an 83-73 victory over St. John’s on Tuesday in the consolation round of the Maui Jim Maui Invitational.

Freshman center Thomas Bryant had a career-high 19 points on 7-of-9 shooting for the Hoosiers (4-1), who lost to Wake Forest 82-78 in the closing seconds of their opening-round game.

Indiana will play the winner of the Chaminade-UNLV game for fifth place on Wednesday.

Federico Mussini and Ron Mvouika had 17 points each for the Red Storm (3-2), who played much better than they did in their 92-55 pasting from No. 19 Vanderbilt in the first round.

Ferrell had an answer every time St. John’s tried to close in in the second half. Four times the Red Storm got within seven points and three of those times Ferrell replied. He hit a short jumper, two free throws and a step-back jumper to keep St. John’s at bay.

The Red Storm got as close as 76-70 with 1:53 to play on two free throws by Yankuba Sima. James Blackmon Jr., who finished with 12 points, hit a 3 and after a St. John’s turnover he scored on a drive to put the game away.

Troy Williams had seven points and nine rebounds for Indiana.

The Hoosiers led by as many as 17 points in the first half and took a 42-31 lead at halftime.


St. John’s: This game started a little bit better than the opening round. In that game Vanderbilt opened by scoring the first nine points of the game. Against Indiana St. John’s trailed 9-2 at the start. … St. John’s had eight turnovers against Vanderbilt. The Red Storm had that many at halftime against the Hoosiers, They finished with 11.

Indiana: Bryant had 15 points at halftime, two off his career high for a game. … Ferrell was 9 of 10 from the free throw line. The rest of the Hoosiers were 6 of 14.

TALE OF THE TAPE: St. John’s trainer Ron Linfonte and Tim Garl, his counterpart at Indiana, are both in their 35th season at their respective schools. They are the two longest-tenured trainers in men’s Division I basketball.


St. John’s: plays loser of Chaminade-UNLV for seventh place on Wednesday.

Indiana: plays winner of Chaminade-UNLV for fifth place on Wednesday.