20 Impact Transfers in College Hoops for 2013-2014

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All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. Check back throughout the day, as we’ll be posting three or four preview items every day.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To see the rest of our preview lists,click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here.

1. Rodney Hood, Duke (via Mississippi State): Jabari Parker isn’t the only Duke forward that being considered an All-American candidate this preseason. After sitting out last season, Hood joins Parker and Rasheed Sulaimon to give Duke one of the best perimeters in the country. The 6-foot-8 Hood suffered an Achilles injury this summer, but has completely recovered. He averaged 10.3 points and 4.8 rebounds per game as a freshman at Mississippi State.

2. T.J. McConnell, Arizona (via Duquesne): There has been buzz around newcomer Aaron Gordon, and rightfully so. But those in Tucson should be excited for T.J. McConnell’s debut in a Cats uniform. McConnell is a true point guard Arizona needs, and Sean Miller has given the junior one of the best front courts to create for. McConnell averaged 11.4 points and 5.5 assists in his final season at Duquesne in 2011-2012. The pass-first point guard is also a pest defensively (2.8 spg) and may be the best deep threat on the Wildcats.

3. Michael Dixon, Memphis (via Missouri): He had to wait it out, but Michael Dixon got cleared to play this season at Memphis in last month. Dixon was named Big 12 All-Defensive team in 2012 and also averaged 13.5 points and 3.3 assists for a 30-win Mizzou team. He gives Memphis one of the nation’s best back courts, and his addition allows Josh Pastner to go with a four-guard set against opposing defenses this season.

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4. Mike Moser, Oregon (via UNLV): Dana Altman has benefited from one-year transfers before and that’s what he’s hoping for with Moser, who left Las Vegas for Eugene for his final season of eligibility. He averaged averaged 14.5 points and 10.0 rebounds a game two seasons ago with the Rebels. He decided not to jump to the NBA, but injuries and an overcrowded front count caused his numbers to dip this past season. A healthy Moser should thrive with the Ducks.

5.  Jordan Clarkson, Missouri (via Tulsa): Jordan Clarkson is making the move to the SEC from Conference USA where he averaged 16.5 points, 3.9 rebounds and 2.5 assists points per game in 2011-2012. The 6-foot-5 Clarkson will be the lead guard this year, playing both point and off-the-ball, since Phil Pressey declared for the NBA draft.

6. Josh Davis, San Diego State (via Tulane):  Josh Davis will be eligible immediately after graduating from Tulane. The athletic forward, who averaged 17.6 points and 10.7 rebounds last season, will help make up for the loss of Jamaal Franklin and Chase Tapley, the Aztec’s top two scorers a season ago.

7. DeAndre Kane, Iowa State (via Marshall): Iowa State lost its top guards to graduation, and last month Bubu Palo who was dismissed from the team. Once again Fred Hoiberg went to the transfer wire, this time landing DeAndre Kane, a 6-foot-4 lead guard that averaged 7.1 assists per game last season to go along with his career average of 15.6 points per game in three seasons at Marshall. He’ll join a team that brings back forwards Melvin Ejim and Georges Niang but was sorely lacking in back court playmakers.

8. Josh Smith, Georgetown (via UCLA): John Thompson III lost Otto Porter to the NBA and, in all likelihood, Greg Whittington for the season with a torn ACL. Ex-UCLA big man Josh Smith will be eligible for the second semester if he doesn’t get a waiver to play immediately. JT3 knows that Smith has the ability to be an all-league player, but his impact for the Hoyas depends on his conditioning.

9. Michael Gbinije, Syracuse (via Duke): Gbinije transferred out of an ACC program and into a Big East school, now in its first season of ACC play. The Orange are without Brandon Triche or Michael Carter-Williams, meaning their back court is made up of freshmen Tyler Ennis and Ron Patterson and sophomore Trevor Cooney, who is coming off a disappointing season. At 6-foot-6 Gbinije will be solid on top of the 2-3 zone, can add depth to the small forward position, and has even worked on his point guard game during his redshirt season.

10. Tarik Black, Kansas (via Memphis): Tarik Black didn’t average more than five rebounds per game in his last two seasons at Memphis, but his role at Kansas will be important. It’s a young team headlined by Andrew Wiggins, Wayne Selden, and Joel Embiid. He’ll be valuable as a physical, veteran low-post presence.

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10 more guys that should be in for a big season

Antonio Barton, Tennessee (via Memphis): Barton filled a void for the Vols at the point when Trae Golden transferred. His shooting and defense gives the Vols even better chances of getting back to the NCAA tournament.

Gerard Coleman, Gonzaga (via Providence): Coleman averaged 13.2 points and five rebounds a game at Providence in 2011-2012. Will fit in nicely alongside Kevin Pangos and Gary Bell.

Alex Dragicevich, Boston College (via Notre Dame): Ryan Anderson and Olivier Hanlan have reason for hope in Chesnut Hill. Notre Dame transfer Alex Dragicevich can add more long-range shooting for Steve Donahue’s team.

Dorian Finney-Smith, Florida (via Virginia Tech): Chris Walker isn’t enrolling this semester, and Will Yeguete is still recovering from a knee injury. Finney-Smith, along with fellow transfer Damontre Harris, are that much more important for front court depth alongside Patric Young.

Derrick Gordon, UMass (via Western Kentucky): The Minutemen have a good shot at the NCAA tournament this season, and Derrick Gordon has that postseason experience after his freshmen year at Western Kentucky. He and Chaz Williams can help UMass hang with the top teams in the Atlantic 10.

Lasan Kromah, UConn (via George Washington): Kromah averaged 10.1 points last season and only improves the UConn back court of Shabazz Napier, Ryan Boatright and Omar Calhoun.

Jermaine Marshall, Arizona State (via Penn State): Adding Jermaine Marshall from Penn State helps negate from the loss of Evan Gordon. He averaged 15.3 points per game last season.

Four McGlynn, Towson (via Vermont): The Tigers will contend in the CAA, and add Vermont transfer, who averaged 12.0 points in his lone season with the Catamounts.

Rayvonte Rice, Illinois (via Drake): The Illini lose Brandon Paul and D.J. Richardson from last season, but Rayvonte Rice, who averaged 16.8 points, 5.8 rebounds and almost two steals per game in 2011-2012, should help fill the void.

Matt Stainbrook, Xavier (via Western Michigan): The former Western Michigan big man is reportedly an inch taller and down 40 pounds since last playing during the 2011-2012 season, where he averaged 11.4 points and 6.8 rebounds per game.

Five-star forward King picks Oregon

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Oregon has nabbed one of the top players in the 2018 class.

Louis King, a top-20 forward, committed to Dana Altman and the Ducks on Thursday via a video on social media.

“It’s been a tough, strenuous process,” King said, “but today makes all of that worth it. I’ve been blessed with great opportunities.”

The 6-foot-8 New Jersey native selected Oregon over other finalists Seton Hall, NC State, Purdue and Kansas.

“I would like to thank each of them for all the time and effort they put into my recruitment,” King said. “I would like to thank my coaches and my teammates that have pushed me and helped get me to this point in my career. My friends for all their love and support, but most of all I would like to thank my family, who has been by my side through it all.”

King is Altman’s second commit in 2018, joining four-star big man Miles Norris, a top-75 recruit in the class. It’s the beginning of what could be an absolutely dynamic class for Oregon, which still has two scholarships remaining.

“Out of all of my schools I felt like it was best for me and my family,” King said to MADE Hoops. “Coach Altman said that I would have the ball in my hands throughout the season. When I get there, it will be an easy adjustment for me with how I handle rock and get my teammates open. Our goal is to win a national championship next year.”

 

Four-star forward Miller Kopp commits to Northwestern

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Northwestern has a second four-star recruit in its 2018 class.

The Wildcats received a commitment from Miller Kopp, a 6-foot-6 forward, on Thursday, he announced via social media.

“I built a really strong relationship with (coach) Chris Collins and I fell in love with the campus,” Kopp told Scout. “I knew it would be a nice campus and have that stuff, but I think me and him are wired the same way. II think that his personality fits mine and I think we complement each other. I’m definitely excited to be able to go to a program on the rise and be able to make some history.”

Kopp picked the Wildcats over offers from Georgetown, Butler, Texas A&M and Vanderbilt. The Houston native is ranked in the top-100 of his class by most recruiting services.

He gives Collins and the Wildcats an exceedingly strong 2018 class, which already featured four-star guard Pete Nance of Ohio along with three-star recruits Jordan Lathon and Ryan Young. It represents a major leap forward for Northwestern. It would appear that the program’s first-ever NCAA tournament appearance last March has brought momentum to the recruiting trail.

 

NEXT ONE? Hoops phenom at 13 has college offer, NBA height

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ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Emoni Bates walks out a front door of Clague Middle School with just inches to spare.

A wide smile tops his 6-foot-7, extra-lean frame. He’s holding a seventh-grade honor society certificate in his right hand. His braces gleam in the afternoon sun.

Meet the best 13-year-old basketball player in America, according to some recruiting services. One of his highlight reels on YouTube has been viewed about 1 million times.

“I don’t really pay attention to it,” Emoni insists in a voice just louder than a whisper, “because if I pay attention to it, it’s just going to get to my head.

“And I don’t want it to get to my head. I just want to play basketball.”

He’s got the pedigree.

Emoni’s father, E.J. Bates, has been around the game most of his life. He picked greens and baled hay as a kid in nearby Milan, Michigan, then developed into a smooth-shooting guard. But he didn’t take school seriously until it was too late. Instead of playing for a basketball power like Kansas and maybe even in the NBA, E.J. wound up going to Kentucky Wesleyan and settling for pro hoops in Switzerland.

E.J. is determined to make sure his son doesn’t make the same mistake. The academics are a sign of that. House rules bar Emoni from picking up a basketball until his homework is done.

Yet E.J. knows when kids are this good this early, distractions roll in like waves. Already, it seems, lots of people want a piece of Emoni. Prep, private and public high school coaches are lining up. Colleges have him on their radar. DePaul took it a step further, offering Emoni a scholarship in late August. Two other much-touted players in the Class of 2022 — Amari Bailey of Illinois and Skyy Clark of California — also have offers from DePaul.

E.J. knows the shoe company bird dogs and other hustlers looking to buy favors are lurking, too. So he and wife Edith, who works for the Red Cross, keep their inner circle very tight.

“I’m his coach to keep the snakes away,” Bates says, sitting on one of Clague’s concrete benches. “We’re not for sale.”

The Bates family has agreed to provide The Associated Press with a rare, behind-the-scenes look at the life of one of the most coveted basketball prospects in the country for at least the next five years. The periodic series will include video, photos, audio and text updates to track his progress.

Will Emoni stay near his current home to attend a public high school? Or will he take his next step at a private school like Detroit Country Day, like Michigan native Chris Webber?

Will he follow the footsteps of Marvin Bagley III and other five-star prospects, reclassifying to finish high school in three years? Bagley did to play college ball at Duke this coming season — and potentially to get a jump on a pro future.

Will E.J. and Emoni emulate the father-son team of LaVar and Lonzo Ball, grabbing headlines while hawking their own brand at every turn?

No one knows.

E.J. says all options are on the table. But he won’t be loud, unlike LaVar Ball in the lead-up to his son Lonzo being drafted by the Los Angeles Lakers.

“I don’t have to brag about what we’re doing,” E.J. says. “I let other people do all the talking about how good Emoni is because word of mouth is the best advertising there is.”

A POTENTIAL STAR IS BORN

Emoni James-Wayne Bates was born Jan. 28, 2004, at the University of Michigan hospital. He was on the light side — 6 pounds, 7 ounces — and a little long at 21 inches. Just over a year later, Emoni slept with his head cradled in his left arm and his right wrapped around a black and red basketball. A cherished photo was made.

“He would always sleep with the ball,” his father recalls, holding a framed picture in his Ypsilanti, Michigan, home. “If the ball wasn’t around, he would cry about the ball. Even to this day, he has a mini-ball he keeps with him, which is crazy to me.”

There were more hints. During a second visit to the doctor, E.J., who is 6-foot-4, and Edith, 5-9, asked how tall their son might grow.

“He was off the charts,” E.J. laughs, “so they couldn’t tell us.”

Emoni has shot up 7 inches in the last two years. He’s tall enough right now to play shooting guard at any level. He handles the ball like a point guard and launches 3-pointers like a savvy veteran. He can create his own shot like a wing or drive the lane and dish off to a teammate like another rail-thin former prodigy, Golden State Warriors star Kevin Durant.

But adding weight and muscle is an ongoing challenge. He weighs just 155 pounds — not heavy or strong enough to play a dominating inside game that would complement his fluid perimeter skills.

“We try to stuff him full of food at night and hope it sticks,” E.J. sighs.

TEEN CELEBRITY

The Adidas Invitational in Fishers, Indiana, attracts some of the Midwest’s top seventh-grade AAU teams. Inside Best Choice Fieldhouse, talk centers on whether the Bates Fundamentals squad starring Emoni and coached by E.J. can live up to the hype.

“They’ve been hearing a lot about him,” says Bernetta Kelly, watching her son’s Peoria Area Elite team take its shot.

Bates Fundamentals wins 95-44 and Kelly understands why. She approaches Emoni and asks for a photo with her son and his team.

“I’ve seen the best players from Pittsburgh to Vegas the last four years, and he’s been the best in his class,” Peoria coach Zach Martin says. “I told the guys, ‘There are not many times you will be able to say you played an NBA player, but you just did.'”

After another lopsided victory in the two-day tournament won easily by Bates Fundamentals, Emoni walks off the court. A younger competitor darts out of his team’s pregame layup line to slap his hand. Moments later, the excitement follows Emoni out the door.

“Hey, that’s him,” a young boy entering the facility says to teammates.

How does a 10-year-old from Fort Wayne, Indiana, know who Bates is?

“YouTube,” he says.

Duh.

The highlight reel posted last summer had nearly 1 million views before Emoni walked into the doors at Clague for the first time as an eighth-grader. Several other videos have racked up 500,000-plus views in less than one year.

By the spring of 2018, the suspense about where he plans to attend high school may be its own mini-drama. Then a few years later: Which college?

E.J. and Edith hardly need reminding that’s still a long way off. As good as the recruiting services have become at projecting stars, it’s easy to forget the object of all that attention is still just 13. At times, the recruiting experts simply miss.

“It’s always a crap shoot,” E.J. says. “You don’t know what life will deal you. You never know what can happen with injuries, the loss of motivation or pressure getting to be too much.”

Yet fans of two college basketball powers with the inside track can already start thinking about the fall of 2021, when Bates can officially sign a scholarship offer. In quiet moments, Emoni sometimes does, too.

Asked about his favorite programs, the soft-spoken kid doesn’t hesitate to name the early front-runners.

“Michigan State and Kentucky,” Emoni says.

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Follow the series: https://www.apnews.com/tag/TheKid

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Follow Larry Lage at http://twitter.com/larrylage

NCAA punishes Pacific men’s basketball for violations

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STOCKTON, Calif. (AP) — The men’s basketball team at Pacific has been punished by the NCAA for academic and recruiting violations under former coach Ron Verlin.

The NCAA said Wednesday that Verlin failed to promote an atmosphere of compliance when he violated academic misconduct and recruiting rules to get prospects eligible. He also failed to monitor his coaches and violated NCAA ethics rules when he encouraged others to give false information during the investigation.

The baseball program was also cited because former coach Ed Sprague impermissibly provided an athletic training student with a $16,000 scholarship to help with the housing costs of two baseball student-athletes, including her brother.

Penalties for the school include two years of probation, recruiting and scholarship reductions, a $5,000 fine and a vacation of all games in which ineligible athletes participated.

Memphis lands commitment from 2018 center Connor Vanover

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Memphis picked up its first commitment in the Class of 2018 on Wednesday night as unique center prospect Connor Vanover announced his decision on Twitter.

At 7-foot-2, Vanover brings elite size to the interior for the Tigers and he’s also skilled enough that he was a 43 percent three-point shooter during his stint playing with Pro Skills in the Nike EYBL this spring. Although Vanover needs to add strength and athleticism to adapt to the college level, he simply has size that you can’t teach. Pair that size with an intriguing perimeter jumper and it’ll be interesting to see how head coach Tubby Smith is able to develop Vanover the next few years.

A three-star prospect according to Rivals, Vanover averaged 9.1 points, 5.5 rebounds and 1.5 blocks per game during the spring. Originally from Arkansas, Vanover is spending his senior season of high school ball at prep school powerhouse Findlay Prep.