Michigan v Louisville

College Hoops is here! Official practices start today

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Ladies and Gentlemen, welcome to college basketball season.

Thanks to a rule change implemented this season, official practices now begin a full six weeks before the first day that teams are allowed to schedule games. And with the real season kicking off on November 8th, that means that today, September 27th — a point in time usually reserved for Fantasy Football freakouts and the culmination of baseball pennant races — is the official beginning of the college hoops season.

Y’all ready?

I am.

(MORE: To read through all of this year’s CBT Season Previews, click here)

Coaches will be allowed 30 days worth of practice over the course of the next 42 days, which will do a couple of things:

  • It will allow coaches to spread out their early season conditioning, which can help to reduce some of the crush of injuries that come with the brutal two-a-days that usually coincide with the start of the season. We use to call it “hell week”, largely because our morning practices didn’t involve a basketball. It got you into shape, but by the end of it, you were so tired and banged up that practice was less about improving and learning and more about just getting through it. Spreading that process out will make those first practices more effective.
  • There is more time for players to learn what a coach wants out of them. The extra two weeks will make it so that coaches can implement more offense earlier in the season. The way coaches work is that they get their defense set in the first few weeks of practice, and then slowly but surely integrate their offense. With three-and-a-half weeks of preseason practices, the offense that gets put into place for the first couple of games is a simple framework of what is in place by January. Might this make those marquee November matchups more palatable?

The difference, however, is that Midnight Madness won’t be happening all at once this season. They will be spread out, with different schools hosting their events throughout the preseason. The concept of Midnight Madness has changed. When it was originally created by Lefty Driesell at Maryland, it was done so because the coach wanted to practice at the first possible second that it was allowed by the NCAA.

Now?

It’s a party, a recruiting tool that’s used to entertain the fan base, introduce the freshmen to the students and to provide a break to the monotony of a six-week preseason.

ESPN’s annual coverage of the event will be on October 18th, with powerhouse programs like Kentucky, Syracuse, Michigan State and Maryland hosting their events that day along with schools like Florida-Gulf Coast. Kansas will be hosting Late Night in the Phog on October 4th, as will Indiana’s Hoosier Hysteria.

The season maybe beginning, but if you’re waiting on Midnight Madness for the year to actually begin, you’ll be waiting a while longer.

VIDEO: Monmouth hits a game-winner, Bench Mob member tries to disrobe

King Rice
AP
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Monmouth used a 17-2 run in the final minutes to beat Rider on Friday night, a win that will keep the Hawks within striking distance of the kind of an at-large bid to the NCAA tournament should they fall in the MAAC tourney.

The run was capped by star point guard Justin Robinson, who buried this three with three seconds left to put Monmouth up for good, 79-78:

No. 17 Arizona erases double-digit deficit to beat UCLA

Arizona coach Sean Miller reacts to a foul call during the first half of Arizona's NCAA college basketball game against UCLA, Friday, Feb 12, 2016, in Tucson, Ariz. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)
(AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)
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Allonzo Trier scored 15 of his 18 points in the second half and Parker Jackson-Cartwright scored 16 points in his second career start as No. 17 Arizona knocked off UCLA, 81-75, in Tucson on Friday night.

UCLA was up by as much as 11 points in the first half and took a ten point lead into half time, but in the second half, the Bruins were eventually done in by foul trouble and the stronger front line of the Wildcats.

Ryan Anderson and Kaleb Tarczewski were dominant down the stretch. The duo combined to score 12 of the last 23 point for the Wildcats, including the bucket that put the Wildcats ahead for the first time since early in the first half. Off of a missed free throw, UCLA’s Thomas Welsh battled with Tarczewski for the rebound, but when Welsh finally seemed to gain control of the loose ball, Anderson knocked it out of his hands and bullied through Jonah Bolden for a layup.

All told, those two combined for 20 points and 27 boards, seven of which were offensive. They also managed to foul out both Welsh and Tony Parker, although some of the calls that went against UCLA down the stretch were questionable.

The win keeps Arizona within a game of first place Oregon in the Pac-12 standings and tied for second with No. 23 USC, who will be visiting the McKale Center on Sunday night.