JimDelany

Jim Delany, Iowa State AD Jamie Pollard spark more pay-for-play debate

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In what has become a now-daily occurrence, a well-known member of the college athletics establishment said something for or against paying collegiate athletes, which subsequently turned into a war of words on my twitter feed between the folks that want to see the labor force get a bigger cut of the profits from college athletics and those that believe a full scholarship is more than enough.

This time, it was Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany, who had plenty to say in regards to college athletics and amateurism. Some of the highlights:

  • “Maybe in football and basketball, it would work better if more kids had a chance to go directly into the professional ranks. If they’re not comfortable and want to monetize, let the minor leagues flourish. Train at IMG, get agents to invest in your body, get agents to invest in your likeness, and establish it on your own. But don’t come here and say, ‘We want to be paid $25,000 or $50,000.’ Go to the D-League and get it, go to the NBA and get it, go to the NFL and get it.”
  • “I don’t view it as a labor force. I view them as athletes, as students. I view the universities and the brands that have been here for 118 years. It’s built by predecessors, from Isiah Thomas to Magic Johnson to John Havlicek to Archie Clark to Red Grange.”
  • “Being a full-time student is basic, providing opportunities for women is basic, providing Olympic sports opportunities for men is basic. The expectation they should graduate at or about the same rate is basic. I don’t want to give those things up. Why? Because we’re wildly successful in football and basketball? Now, if a judge says, ‘You must pay,’ I said, ‘OK. Tell us what to do now.'”

Then Iowa State’s Athletic Director Jamie Pollard decided to drop by, doing his best to drive a wedge between the non-revenue sports athletes — whose teams are funded by football and basketball — and the revenue sports athletes.

I’m not going to get to wordy about how ridiculous and shameful the concept of amateurism truly his (just read this), or why most of what Delany said is inaccurate (read this, too), or try and explain to you why college is the only real option for players in revenue sports, or list off the reasons why the “education” these athletes receive is not the same as the education a normal student gets. If you truly believe that college football and basketball players shouldn’t get a bigger cut of the money they generate, than I can’t help you. I just have to be glad you don’t actually have a say in the matter.

The one thing I’ll say is this: the heart of the problem isn’t the lack of pay for the players, it’s the lack of say. They have no power. They have no voice. They only thing really differentiating them from being employees of these universities is a label a court ruling from 50-some odd years ago, yet there is no college athlete union.

The NFL and the NBA have a collective bargaining agreement between the players and the owners. College athletes are at the mercy of a group of athletic directors that don’t want to see their seven-figure salaries reduced.

If that doesn’t rub you the wrong way, I’m not sure what I can say to you.

Rick Pitino: ‘We should be penalized … but not this team’

Rick Pitino
(AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
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One of the biggest storylines of Saturday’s college basketball schedule had everything to do with a team that no longer matters in the championship picture.

Less than 24 hours after being informed that the school would be imposing a postseason ban that will leave the Cardinals out of the ACC and NCAA tournaments, No. 19 Louisville tipped off against Boston College, and they did so without leading scorer Damion Lee, who is battling a knee issue.

How would the team respond to the decision — the despicable, shameful decision — that the university’s president made?

Well, it seems.

The Cardinals jumped out to a 19-2 lead in the first eight minutes and cruised to a 79-47 win over an overmatched Boston College team in the Yum! Center.

And head coach Rick Pitino, after the quote, said exactly what everyone is thinking.

“We should be penalized, no question about it,” he said. “But not this team. But the NCAA didn’t make that decision. We made that decision.”

He’s totally right. The school sacrificed the season — and the only shot that a pair of fifth-year seniors would get to play in the NCAA tournament — to protect the school, the brand and the bottom-line moving forward. Like I said earlier, it’s despicable.

But credit the Cardinals for responding.

Because they still have something on the line. They’re just a game out of first place in the ACC, and while an ACC regular season title isn’t a shot to play in the ACC or NCAA tournament, it’s still a banner that would probably mean more to Damion Lee and Trey Lewis than any league title has meant to a Louisville player before.

Oklahoma State without Jawun Evans, questionable moving forward

Oklahoma State guard Jawun Evans (1) goes up for a shot between Kansas forward Jamari Traylor (31) and forward Perry Ellis (34) in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Stillwater, Okla., Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016. Oklahoma State won 86-67. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
(AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
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Oklahoma State’s star point guard was not in the lineup on Saturday against No. 13 Iowa State.

Evans injured his shoulder in the Cowboys’ loss at Texas Tech on Wednesday and was ruled out of Saturday’s game.

According to the school, his official status moving forward is questionable. The Pokes are just 11-11 on the season and likely need to earn the Big 12’s at-large bid to get into the NCAA tournament. It makes sense to let him get healthy.

Evans was averaging 12.9 points, 4.9 assists and 4.4 boards this season, but he had been arguably the best point guard in the Big 12 during league play, averaging 15.6 points and 5.6 assists.