Michigan Wolverines' Albrecht reacts after a three point basket against the Louisville Cardinals during the first half of their NCAA men's Final Four championship basketball game in Atlanta

Michigan students only used 46% of purchased student tickets

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Michigan basketball has been on a massive upswing since they began the 2010-2011 season 1-6 in league play.

The Wolverines ended up making the tournament and reaching the Round of 32 in 2011. They won a share of the Big Ten title in 2012. They made the National Title game in 2013 while sending the National Player of the Year to the NBA Draft’s lottery. They bring back one of the best sophomore classes in the country, sit pretty with a preseason top ten ranking and are competing with the big boys for some of the most talented recruits nationally.

Things are going quite well for John Beilein up in Ann Arbor.

But I guess Michigan is still a football school — Or academic school? Stop studying so much, kids! — because the Wolverines only saw an average of 46.1% of the student tickets that they sold get used in 2012-2013, according to the Michigan Daily, well below the Big Ten average of 67%.

So the school has decided to change the way that they give out student tickets. 4,500 student tickets were sold despite the fact that there is only room for 3,000 students in Crisler Arena. From the Daily:

Under the new system, Michigan’s 17 home fixtures will be split into six different pods of three or four games each. A couple of weeks before each pod’s contests, tickets will become available online for a 72-hour period. Students can then select which games they plan to attend, and the ticket will then be electronically transferred to the student’s MCard where it can be used or sold.

“The only con is not every student is guaranteed a seat,” Lochmann said. “But I think — we don’t know this — that if you want to go to every game, you’re going to go to every game.”

[…]

If a student twice claims tickets that he or she does not use, he will not be eligible for tickets to the next pod of games. If a student misses four claimed games, he will not be eligible for any more tickets. Even if he sells the ticket to someone who then chooses not to attend, the student will be penalized.

[…] For the Wolverines’ marquee contest against rival Michigan State, the Athletic Department will distribute its allotment of 3,000 tickets to the students who attended the most games.

“(The Michigan State game) is where we’re going to reward our most loyal students,” Lochmann said.

Students weren’t all excited about this decision, and Athletic Director Dave Brandon got hammered on twitter, but this policy makes some sense.

I’d be willing to bet that more students will be showing up to more games, especially if a ticket to Michigan State is on the line. As long as the devoted fans are taken care of, there shouldn’t be too much complaining by the time the season comes to an end.

Michigan fans, how do you feel about this?

And if you’re a student at another school with a similar policy, how has this worked out for you?

VIDEO: Duke’s Grayson Allen beats No. 7 Virginia at the buzzer

Duke's Grayson Allen (3) and Marshall Plumlee (40) react during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Louisville in Durham, N.C., Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. Duke won 72-65. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
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Notre Dame’s Steve Vasturia sparks come-from-behind win over No. 13 Louisville

Notre Dame’s Steve Vasturia (32) goes up for a shot over Boston College’s Idy Diallo (4) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in South Bend, Ind. (AP Photo/Robert Franklin)
(AP Photo/Robert Franklin)
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Demetrius Jackson scored 20 of his 25 points in the first half and Steve Vasturia scored 15 of his 20 points in the final 20 minutes as Notre Dame landed a 71-66 win over No. 13 Louisville on Saturday afternoon.

The Fighting Irish trailed by as many as 11 points early in the second half, but Vasturia’s hot shooting combined with Notre Dame holding Louisville to just 15 points in the final 15 minutes made all the difference.

The Fighting Irish are not as good as they were last season, but they are built in a similar mold. Jackson, as we expected, as become one of the nation’s most dynamic point guards, impossible to slow-down in isolation and ball-screen actions. Steve Vasturia emerging as a legitimate secondary option offensively and Zach Auguste is one of the nation’s most underrated big men and one of the most dangerous as the roll-man in ball-screens.

Combine all of that with a handful of shooters creating space and Bonzie Colson’s emergence as a force on the offensive glass, and Mike Brey once again has one of the nation’s most lethal offensive attacks.

Where they struggle is on the defensive end of the floor, which is what makes the end of Saturday’s win so meaningful. The Irish entered the day ranked 232nd in KenPom’s adjusted defensive efficiency metric, which more or less means they’re as good as a bad mid-major program at keeping their opponents from scoring.

But they don’t have to be great to be able to win games.

They have to be good enough and they have to get important stops.

That’s precisely what happened on Saturday.

Whether or not that actually becomes a trend for this group will be something to monitor — it happened for Duke during last year’s NCAA tournament — but the bottom-line is this: Notre Dame does something better than just about anyone else in college basketball, and that’s score the ball.

On the nights they are able to gets some stops, they are going to be able to win some games. In the last eight days, they’ve proven that, beating North Carolina, Clemson on the road and Louisville.

And that makes them dangerous in March.