NCAA, D-II Slippery Rock sued over death of Jack Hill, Jr.

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The family of a Division II basketball player that died after an intense practice due to complications from sickle cell trait have sued Slippery Rock (PA) University and the NCAA.

The parents of Jack Hill Jr., Jack Sr. and Cheryl, said that their son wasn’t screened for sickle cell trait and that school officials didn’t do enough to save their son’s life. Screening for sickle cell wasn’t required for Division I athletes until 2010 or for Division II athletes until 2012.

Hill died exactly two years ago Tuesday, on September 10th, 2011.

“The tragedy of the preventable death of a promising young man is that knowing that sickle cell trait was the leading cause of student athlete deaths, the NCAA began mandating testing for SCT at Division I schools in 2010, but the mandate didn’t take effect at Division II schools like Slippery Rock until August 2012 — a year after Jack’s death, and a direct contributor to it,” said Tom Kline, the parents’ attorney who announced the lawsuit Monday.

Sickle cell trait is not a disease state and it does not affect the normal life expectancy of someone with the SCT, but it is dangerous for athletes. When a person with SCT exerts themselves too much physically, their red blood cells can sickle, or form c-shapes. Those sickles can result in blockages being in veins and capillaries, which can have serious, sometimes deadly, repercussions if the logjams stop the blood from flowing.

Athletes with SCT can be just as successful as athletes without SCT. Last summer, I wrote a story on Billy Garrett, who is currently a freshman at DePaul, and how he battles SCT. Proper hydration is a key, as is the moderation and mitigation of their physical exertion. Athletes with SCT should get more time to finish a timed two-mile run, or more time in between suicides at the end of practices.

Hill, according to the lawsuit, died during a “nighttime ‘insanity practice’ [held] as punishment for the entire team,” according to the AP.

Louisville’s Rick Pitino on allegations: ‘We will get through this’

Rick Pitino
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) Louisville coach Rick Pitino remains defiant that his program will survive the allegations in a book by an escort alleging that former Cardinals staffer Andre McGee hired her and other dancers to strip and have sex with recruits and players.

Pitino said Tuesday that the Cardinals “will get through this the right way.”

The coach told a packed room at a tipoff luncheon that he understands the motivation behind Katina Powell’s book “Breaking Cardinal Rules: Basketball and the Escort Queen,” but questions the need for the alleged activities given the talent his program has produced.

Pitino added, “We will find out the truth, whatever it may be, and those responsible will pay the price.”

Georgia Tech lands Class of 2016 guard

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Georgia Tech picked up its third Class of 2016 commitment on Tuesday as the Yellow Jackets landed a pledged from three-star guard Josh Okogie.

The 6-foot-4 guard is considered the No. 143 overall prospect in the national Class of 2016 rankings and Okogie played with a very talented Team CP3 in the Nike EYBL. In 22 games this spring and summer, Okogie averaged 10.6 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.6 steals per game while shooting 45 percent from the field.

Okogie joins three-star wing Christian Matthews and four-star big man Romello White in head coach Brian Gregory’s Class of 2016 at Georgia Tech. The group is definitely a solid influx of talent with some coming from successful grassroots programs.