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Wichita State player collapses at practice, brings back awful memories for Gregg Marshall

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In a situation that’s become all too common in sports these days, Wichita State freshman guard D.J. Bowles collapsed during practice on Tuesday.

“He blacked out, he lost consciousness and we’re at the hospital right now trying to determine what his situation is,” Gregg Marshall told on Thursday morning. He was admitted on Tuesday night and had tests all day Wednesday, but Marshall said they still don’t know what caused Bowles to collapse.

“I want to commend athletic trainer Todd Fagan, our athletic training staff, and emergency medical personnel, for quick and professional response exhibited in dealing with D.J.’s situation,” Director of Athletics Eric Sexton said in a statement.

Bowles was upgraded to fair condition on Wednesday night, which, obviously, is good news.

For Marshall, however, the incident brought back some terrifying memories.

In April of 2007, just days after being introduced as Wichita State’s new head coach, Marshall was in the stands at New Hampton Prep watching Guy Alang-Ntang, who was committed to the Shockers.

“My first week on the job, I was recruiting a kid that had been recruited by the previous staff,” Marshall said, his voice audibly shaking. “I was confirming his commitment to honor his National Letter of Intent, and he had told me he was going to do that, and 30 minutes later, during a workout, he perished.”

“I witnessed it. It was kind of a déjà vu with D.J., and it scared me.”

The idea that a young athlete, a kid who has dedicated their entire life to being in the best possible shape in order to earn a scholarship and, potentially, make a living playing a sport, can die because of a ticking time-bomb in their chest is terrifying. It’s devastating for those that have experienced it. When I was in college, a kid I had played AAU ball with passed away while jogging on the Morgan State campus due to a bad heart.

Last season, Creighton’s Josh Jones saw his career come to an end after passing out 35 minutes before a game against Nebraska; he has an atrial flutter. That came just days after Utah State’s Danny Berger was revived by a trainer using a defibrillator on his heart after he collapsed during a practice. Allan Chaney of High Point sat out for three years due to a heart condition before playing last season. Four years ago, Emmanuel Negedu needed a defibrillator to revive him after collapsing at a practice at Tennessee. He had a pacemaker installed and was cleared by New Mexico, but his career ended when the pacemaker gave off a bad reading during a game.

The good news, according to Marshall, is that the doctors have ruled out hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, an enlargement of muscles in the heart that causes many incidents of sudden cardiac death, but despite a litany of tests, the cause of Bowles’ blackout is still unknown. There’s no timetable for a return.

“I don’t know what other tests they’ve got to do,” he said, “but at some point, they’re going to figure out what’s going on with this kid.”

The incident with Bowles shook Marshall, but he’s thankful this story was different.

“This one had a much, much better ending thus far. A happier ending,” he said.

Ingram scores 15, leads No. 6 Duke past pesky Yale 80-61

Marshall Plumlee, Matt Jones, Amile Jefferson
AP Photo/Gerry Broome
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DURHAM, N.C. (AP) Freshman Brandon Ingram scored 15 points and played a key role in the defensive switch that helped No. 6 Duke beat Yale 80-61 on Wednesday night.

Matt Jones had 17 points and Grayson Allen scored 15 for the Blue Devils (5-1), while Ingram sparked Duke out of a lethargic start with his pressure as the front man after the switch to a 1-3-1 zone defense.

Freshman Luke Kennard finished with 12 points for the Blue Devils, who finally took control with a 17-2 run during a 5 1/2-minute span that bridged the halves. Duke outscored Yale 42-25 in the second half.

Justin Sears scored 19 points and Makai Mason had 13 points for the Bulldogs (3-2). The preseason favorites in the Ivy League led for all but 90 seconds of the first half but shot just 30 percent after the break.

The clear difference was Duke’s switch late in the first half to that zone defense with the 6-foot-9 Ingram out in front – where he could disrupt Yale’s ballhandlers, get his 7-3 wingspan into passing lanes and pester the perimeter shooters.

Yale, which shoots 40 percent from 3-point range, was just 4 of 15 in this one. Duke finished with 12 steals and forced 13 turnovers, turning them into 16 points.

That defensive pressure sparked the game-turning run, with the zone forcing turnovers on consecutive trips down court that Duke turned into transition buckets.

Ingram later took a steal coast to coast for a layup that gave the Blue Devils their first double-figure lead at 48-38 with 16:43 to play. Allen capped the decisive run with a layup on the next trip down court.

They eventually pulled away, pushing the lead into the 20s on a jumper with 2 1/2 minutes left by Amile Jefferson, who finished with 12 rebounds.

The lopsided final score was surprising because Duke was in trouble for virtually the entire first half. Yale routinely outworked the Blue Devils and generated easy baskets – none easier than Mason’s unimpeded drive across the lane for a layup that put the Bulldogs up 27-20 with 7 1/2 minutes left before the break.


VIDEO: Colorado player ejected for biting another player

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Colorado is playing Air Force tonight.

For some reason or another, Colorado’s Tory Miller got mad at Air Force’s Hayden Graham.

So he bit him.


At least he didn’t pretend that he teeth hurt after getting bit.

Miller, obviously, was ejected. Colorado ended up winning the game.