Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott not a fan of “1-and-done” rule


There are countless rules in college basketball that will always have detractors, and the 1-and-done rule is one of these.

Some background on the rule — In 2005, the NBA and its players implemented an age limit requiring players entering the draft to be 19 years old or having completed their freshman year of college. As a result, players who would have jumped directly to the NBA out of high school were forced to spend a year in college before entering the draft or, in some cases, head overseas for a year or two.

Larry Scott, the Pac-12 commissioner, thinks the 1-and-done rule is a total sham as having a college basketball player on campus for less than 12 months hardly constitutes him as a “student-athlete.”

According to, at the Pac-12 football media day, Scott told a group of reporters: “Anyone that’s serious about the collegiate model and the words ‘student-athlete’ can’t feel very good about what’s happening in basketball with one-and-done student athletes.”

Understandable. Not many are arguing that recent 1-and-dones like Anthony Davis and Kyrie Irving, and Andrew Wiggins — who’s all but proclaimed he will be at Kansas for just one season — were at their respective colleges to receive a true education. They were there to hone their skills, gain national exposure, and elevate their draft stock for the NBA. That’s not a mystery.

Since the rule was adopted, 59 one-and-done players have been drafted, including eight this past year, according to Doug Haller.

What Scott fails to offer though is a solution. If not 1-and-done, then is it “2-and-through” or “3-and-free”?

Scott went onto say:

We’ve managed with the NFL and football to have a reasonable policy that allows kids to go pro at the appropriate time. We’ve managed to do it in baseball. Basketball’s the only sport where we haven’t managed to come up with a responsible policy and the blame is with the NBA, the NBA Players Association and the NCAA, so now’s the time to take ownership of it. We’ve got time. We’ve made major changes in football. Now there’s time to make major changes in basketball.

Comparing football to basketball is apples to oranges. There are an extremely low percentage of 18 and 19 year olds out there that have the body and sheer strength to jump right to the NFL. Even the majority of college football players realize, from purely a physical level, they aren’t ready to compete in the NFL. Conversely, the NBA doesn’t have the kind of physical play that football has.

1-and-done is not a perfect model, but what is the alternative?

The NCAA and landscape of college athletics — specifically basketball — is changing right before our eyes. With these changes happening annually, it shouldn’t come as a surprise is rules like the 1-and-done isn’t amended.


VIDEO: Utah Valley’s Mark Pope dances, lip syncs with daughters

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New Utah Valley head coach Mark Pope made quite an impression on fans at the team’s Midnight Madness celebration last night. That’s because Pope did a dance and lip sync routine with his four daughters that turned out to be pretty impressive.

The former BYU assistant looks to be the leader in the clubhouse for best coach dance so far this preseason. We’ll see if any other coaches pull out elaborate routines at madness celebrations the next few weeks.

UConn commit tears ACL for second time

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UConn commit Juwan Durham, a four-star big man in the Class of 2016, has torn the ACL in his right knee for the second time in seven months. The Florida native committed to the Huskies and head coach Kevin Ollie back in September. The 6-foot-9 forward is regarded as the No. 31 overall prospect in the national Class of 2016, so he can really be a force when he’s healthy.

In a report from’s Bob Putnam, UConn was notified of the injury immediately and there is no change in plans with the commitment. The Huskies also own commitments from four-star point guard Alterique Gilbert and three-star power forward Mamadou Diarra in the Class of 2016. Having Diarra, an active, rim-protecting presence, helps with Durham’s recovery, since he can provide some more front court depth.

If Durham rehabs back to full speed, UConn has a very talented power forward who was just hitting his stride in the Florida state playoffs last February. UConn has a nice class so far with this group, especially if Durham can recover, With a year to recover until next season, Durham can hopefully play during his freshman season in 2016.