John Swofford

Possible ACC Network would face many hurdles

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The Big Ten Network has been immensely profitable to league member schools. According to a recent article by Andy Bitter of the Virginian-Pilot, the network passes along somewhere around $7 million to league schools every year as part of the TV rights deal. It’s important to remember, however, that the BTN is currently the exception rather than the rule.

The Pioneering Mountain West Sports Network shut down in 2012 in part because the league itself was so volatile. The network’s footprint was a constantly moving target, as member schools leaped from stepping stone to stepping stone on the way up the realignment ladder. The Pac-12 Network is doing battle with DirecTV and having trouble turning a profit. The SEC Network debuts in 2014, and any notion of a Big 12 Network seems to be completely subservient to the already extant Longhorn Network.

So would the expanded ACC be willing to jump into such uncertain waters? Certainly. But Bitter’s article does an excellent job pointing out the potential obstacles any such venture would face:

  • Deals in place: The ACC is already partnered with ESPN, and the cable network is entitled to show the premiere matchups, including the immense Duke/UNC hoops matchups. Regional TV deals with Fox (which ties into YES Network) and Raycom also would reduce the number of games available to be shown on any theoretical ACC Network.
  • Cable companies: Not only does a league-only network have to get cable companies to assign a channel to carry their programming, but they have to negotiate how much money they get out of the deal. Media consultant Neal Pilson told Bitter “If you get 100 percent distribution and 5 cents per channel, it’s not going to work.” The Pac-12’s battle with DirecTV is evidence of just how combative such negotiations can become.
  • Questionable market saturation: The ACC covers some large media markets already (though Maryland’s defection hurt), and the addition of Syracuse is supposedly going to give the league an entree into the massive NYC market. Just because New Yorkers happily tuned in to watch the Big East tournament at Madison Square Garden in years past doesn’t mean that love will transfer to regular-season matchups.

The positives are numerous as well. The ACC gained a significant edge by securing a grant of media rights from the league’s current and future members. That’s a sign of stability that can’t be ignored. The league’s YouTube channel has been more successful than any other league’s as well, which could be a good indicator of future interest.

The SEC Network’s upcoming debut will probably give us some indication of where the ACC might turn. If the SEC can make it work with ESPN’s help, it can at least provide some hint of whether the ACC can do the same. Obviously, however, the SEC’s football brand is far more valuable than the ACC’s, and that’s the real driver of payouts in this business model.

Will an ACC Network happen? Maybe. But not soon, it seems.

Knee injury temporarily sidelines Memphis assistant

Toronto Raptors vs Charlotte Hornets
Associated Press
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With practices beginning this weekend, not only are players looking to avoid the injury bug but their coaches are as well. And in the case of Memphis, the Tigers won’t have one of their assistants on the court for a little while due to a knee injury.

Assistant coach Damon Stoudamire, who returned to Josh Pastner’s staff this summer after a two-year stint at Arizona, suffered the injury during a recent workout according to L. Jason Smith of the Memphis Commercial-Appeal. And Stoudamire will require surgery, which will put him on the shelf for a little bit.

“He was working out himself and I think he thought he was in his rookie year,” Pastner said. “We think he’s got a torn meniscus, which will require surgery and put him out for a couple of days.”

Stoudamire isn’t the only assistant coach working through pain either. Syracuse’s Mike Hopkins, who is also Jim Boeheim’s heir apparent as head coach, suffered a neck injury body surfing during a family vacation last month. Hopkins spent some time in a neck brace while putting players through workouts as a result of the injury.

As for the Tigers, they’ll have a mixture of experience on the perimeter and youth in the front court as they look to get back to the NCAA tournament after missing out last season. Among the newcomers are talented forwards Dedric and K.J. Lawson, with experienced guards such as Kedren Johnson, Trahson Burrell and Ricky Tarrant (grad transfer from Alabama) expected to be key contributors on the perimeter.

Duke figuring out approach for this season

Duke University head basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski speaks with the media about the Blue Devils' 2013-14 basketball season, Wednesday, March 26, 2014, in Durham, N.C. (Chuck Liddy/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
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Duke is coming off of a national championship but the roster will look almost completely different for the 2015-16 season. That means last season’s approach to things on the offensive and defensive end will have to change and head coach Mike Krzyzewski mentioned to reporters on Friday how the Blue Devils are still figuring some things out.

“We’re putting in a different offensive system, to personalize it for these guys,” Krzyzewski said to reporters. “And a different defensive system so that we can max out on the talents that they have.

“We’re really proud of our team. I think we’re going to be a really good team.”

Without Jahlil Okafor in the middle, Duke’s offense could shift to a mostly perimeter-oriented team, as the wing and guard depth is superior for this year’s group.  Coach K and his staff making adjustments to schemes to fit personnel is a nice move from the Hall of Famer, as he’s done a better job in recent years of making adjustments like this after his stint with USA Basketball.

As the program moves on from Okafor, Tyus Jones, Justise Winslow and Quinn Cook, it’ll be intriguing to see who emerges as a potential go-to offensive player early in the season and how Duke’s offense potentially evolves as the season wears on.