July may be tiresome, but there’s little the NCAA can do to fix that

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Yesterday, I wrote about the current July evaluation period structure — three five-day recruiting periods in a 19 day span, broken up by a pair of Mondays and Tuesdays — and the fact that a number of coaches and people involved with high-level recruits believed that it wasn’t the best option.

I ended on this note: “the one thing that most people seem to agree upon is that this is not the best possible model.”

That may be true, but the question that should be asked is whether or not there is a better option than this. As John Infante of the Bylaw Blog notes, there really isn’t an answer that makes July any less strenuous on the kids, and it’s the kids that matter here, not the coaches.

Think about it. We changed from the two 10-day recruiting periods because the prospects were toast by the end a week-and-a-half stretch of playing two and three games a day while shlepping across the country. Sean Miller, Arizona’s head coach, proposed a single 12-to-15 day evaluation period, but that would only exacerbate all of the problems involved in both schedule structures. Portland head coach Eric Reveno tossed out the idea of having a set number of recruiting days for the coaches, but that would mean that the players have to be on the road constantly, as the players looking to earn a scholarship will want to play in front of coaches as often as possible.

The bottom-line, Infante says, is that the NCAA has reached the point where trying to regulate grassroots basketball is a lost-cause:

the NCAA’s rules have little effect on when or where prospects play. How quickly experienced head coaches like Reveno and Miller forget what happened with April AAU events. The NCAA banned Division I coaches from going, but the NCAA cannot stop the recruiting media from attending. Just because a player cannot be seen by coaches in person does not mean a tournament is not a good place to be seen period. College coaches then complained about having to appease the same third-parties the NCAA wanted to remove from the recruiting process in order to get information about April events.

The NCAA has reached the limit of what it alone can reasonably do to “fix” AAU. As coverage and even broadcasting of nonscholastic basketball expands, the NCAA’s tools of when college coaches can attend events and which events it certifies are getting less and less useful.

The bottom-line is that the NCAA should be concerned first-and-foremost with building rules that primarily benefit the athletes, but regardless of how they structure July evaluation periods, the prospects are going to be on the road, playing in as many events as possible. The companies that hold these AAU tournaments and exposure camps make their money during these spring and summer months, and as long as the camps and tournaments are profitable, they are going to host as many of them as possible.

The NCAA can only stop that one way, and it’s not going to happen. From Infante:

Unless you are prepared to watch a kid get suspended or ruled ineligible because he played into too many AAU tournaments while chasing a scholarship, the NCAA needs outside help to fix this problem.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Big South moving 2016 conference tournament

Cliff Ellis
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The Big South is moving its 2016 men’s basketball tournament out of Coastal Carolina and a new site will be figured out by November. According to a release from the conference the Big South is using a league bylaw that stipulates that members leaving with less than two years of notice are not eligible to host championships. Coastal Carolina announced this summer that it would be leaving for the Sun Belt as of July 2016, so the Big South wants to find a new location that benefits teams staying in the league.

The Big South men’s and women’s conference tournaments are now also going to be split into two unique events, with the men’s championships being held Thursday-Sunday, March 3-6. The women’s event comes the next week from March 10-13. Bids for both events will come into the league and a new location will be selected in the next few months.

It will be interesting to see if the site of the conference tournament is moved to a campus site or placed at a neutral venue. That type of thing could alter how the NCAA tournament autobid gets played out. With Coastal Carolina coming off of back-to-back NCAA tournament appearances, this obviously changes their approach to the postseason now that they have to leave their city.

Virginia Tech could redshirt sophomore guard

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Virginia Tech is trying to decide what to do with injury sophomore guard Ahmed Hill, who had surgery this summer to deal with a tear in his patella tendon in his left knee.

The 6-foot-5 Hill has still not been released to work out with the team, but he is about a week to 10 days ahead of schedule in his rehab. But the injury is still nagging enough that Hill might not be healthy enough to really contritbute this season. Head coach Buzz Williams is deciding soon whether he wants to redshirt Hill or not.

Hill started a team-high 30 games for the Hokies last season, averaging 8.7 points and 3.7 rebounds per game.

“I don’t have a decision on (Hill),” Williams said to reporters on Monday. “I will make the final decision. I’ll let (him) and his mom be a part of it, but I want to make a decision using the wisdom of doing this for a long period of time. If you let a kid make the decision, they always want to play.

“Right now, I don’t feel comfortable that I would want to play him. It’s just too early to be able to have much more of an answer than that.”

It’s still a rebuilding year for Virginia Tech, but they do get Maryland transfer Seth Allen, who is a talented guard who can score. The Hokies were hoping to have Hill and Allen as complimentary perimeter scorers, but now the plans might have to be altered. Williams went on to say that he would like to make a decision on Hill’s status by Halloween.