Prime_prep

Why did Prime Prep products Jordan Mickey and Karviar Shepard get ruled non-qualifiers?

Leave a comment

On Thursday afternoon, news broke that Jordan Mickey and Karviar Shepard were ruled non-qualifiers by the NCAA, likely due to the fact that they attended Prime Prep, Deion Sanders’ charter school in Dallas, last season.

There were two facts that made this case interesting: for starters, the No. 3 player in the Class of 2014, Emmanuel Mudiay, and a top ten recruit in the Class of 2015, Elijah Thomas, both attend Prime Prep, which could call into question whether or not they will be able to get eligible to play in college.

More intriguing, however, is the fact that Prime Prep announced that the school had taken the “preliminary steps” to NCAA certification and that their prospects would be eligible for “individual review” by the NCAA Eligibility Center. But did they ever complete the certification process? Based on the quotes from Jeff Goodman’s sources in this story, it doesn’t look like it.

“The kids were misled by the school,” one source told ESPN.com. “Everyone told them there wouldn’t be any issues.”

John Infante of the Bylaw Blog did some digging and tried to explain exactly what happened in this case. The first thing to note is that this disclaimer appears at the top of the list of approved core courses on Prime Prep’s page on the Eligibility Center’s website:

“This program is under an extended evaluation period to determine if it meets the academic requirements for NCAA cleared status. During this evaluation period, the courses listed below may be subject to further review on a case-by-case basis, which will require additional academic documentation.”

Infante explains:

That means when prospective student-athletes from Prime Prep submits their transcripts to the Eligibility Center, they likely also have to submit additional information, such as grade books, course stop-start dates and assignment dates, detailed course outlines, even copies of assignments, quizzes, and exams completed by the student.

What the NCAA is trying to determine is that the courses it has approved are being taught in an academically sound manner. When a school submits a new course or especially when a new school establishes its list for the first time, all the NCAA has is how the school plans to teach the course. The PSA Review process is then used to determine if the course is actually being taught according to the approved plan.

One of the issues may be with how Prime Prep educates. They use a program called VSchoolz, a digital learning system described in this report from last November as “mostly used by only a handful of schools nationwide as a credit recovery or supplemental education resource”.

This is how Mudiay described his classes on Thursday when NBCSports.com asked him about it: “It’s on a laptop. It’s called VSchoolz. It teaches you everything in there, and they’ve got a teacher in there in case you need any assistance.”

So you’re getting classes over the internet?

“Yeah, but next year I think they’re going to change it.”

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

UNLV dismisses guard Daquan Cook from team

Illinois v UNLV
Ethan Miller/Getty Images
Leave a comment

LAS VEGAS (AP) UNLV junior guard Daquan Cook has been dismissed from the team.

Interim coach Todd Simon made the announcement on Friday, though no reason was given.

Cook was suspended for 13 games by previous coach Dave Rice in November after being arrested and charged with DUI.

Cook appeared in two games this season after being reinstated, scoring three points in four minutes. He missed the 2014-15 season after tearing his right ACL and played 28 games as a sophomore.

VIDEO: Seton Hall players have their 80s hip hop knowledge tested

Seton Hall guard Isaiah Whitehead, left, sits next to head coach Kevin Willard during the first half of an NCAA basketball game against Creighton, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016, in Newark, N.J. Creighton won 81-65. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
AP Photo/Julio Cortez
1 Comment

If you grew up during the 1980’s, get ready to feel old.

Seton Hall, which has won it’s last three games, hosts Georgetown Saturday on what is also “80’s Night.” Of course we’re at the point where athletes playing in these games were born after that decade passed, which makes quizzing them on the 80’s that much more entertaining.

Friday John Fanta of the Pirate Sports Network quizzed Isaiah Whitehead, Derrick Gordon, Khadeen Carrington and Ish Sanogo on their knowledge of 80’s hip hop, and outside of a couple correct guesses it did not go too well. Best part of the video: Whitehead asking “is this Run DMC?” after each song.

It’s just a matter of time until we’re old enough to watch college basketball players struggle to identify some of the songs of the 1990’s.