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Forward Rashed Anthony signs with Seton Hall

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Kevin Willard and Seton Hall inked a late 2013 commitment from Rasheed Anthony, a 6-foot-8 forward from Flora Macdonald Academy in Red Springs, NC.

For much of his college recruitment, Anthony was considered a fringe BCS-level player, but teams came onto him late. The one team that was with him from nearly the beginning was Seton Hall, and that paid off for Kevin Willard. Anthony rounds out Seton Hall’s 2013 recruiting class to go along with in-state product Jaren Sina out of Gill Saint Bernard’s (Travis Berry is a projected walk-on from the Kent School (CT)).

As of this past April, Boston College, Oklahoma, and Kansas State reportedly offered Anthony, as well, per Justin Byerly of CarolinaPreps.com:

The Pirates began their recruitment of Anthony in September of 2012, and had him for an official visit roughly two weeks ago.

According to SouthOrangeJuice.com, a website dedicated to Seton Hall basketball, Anthony should be eligible to play immediately despite there potentially being some issues on the surface:

Rashed Anthony was cleared by the N.C.A.A. clearinghouse last week. This is relevant due to the fact that Rashed’s high school isn’t exactly being held in the best light as of last fall. Flora MacDonald had their 2011-12 1-A title taken away by the North Carolina Independent School Athletic Association in October. They were also banned from postseason play for three seasons, which included Rashed Anthony’s senior season.

A scouting report from SLAM Online had this to say about the most recent member of the Pirates: “A bouncy forward with crazy wingspan, he was able to dominate…on the defensive end while also providing his team with a spark with his high activity level offensively.”

You can find Kevin on twitter @KLDoyle11

Five things we learned from No. 11 UCLA’s win at No. 1 Kentucky

LEXINGTON, KY - DECEMBER 03: Malik Monk #5 of the Kentucky Wildcats reacts in the second half of the game against the UCLA Bruins at Rupp Arena on December 3, 2016 in Lexington, Kentucky. UCLA defeated Kentucky 97-92. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
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No. 11 UCLA went into Rupp Arena on Saturday afternoon and knocked off No. 1 Kentucky, 97-92

The game was just as entertaining as we all thought it was going to be, only the outcome turned out just a bit different. 

Here are five things we learned from the game.

1. UCLA is much better defensively than they were a season ago: That was the biggest question mark with this team entering the season. Will they be good enough defensively to win games? The answer is yes. I wrote a full column on UCLA’s defense already, so I won’t waste anymore words on it here.

2. T.J. Leaf is a problem: The UCLA freshman that we had all heard so much about was Lonzo Ball, and rightfully so. Ball is a likely lottery pick, a kid that has the potential to one day be Jason Kidd, and he’s one of the most entertaining players in all of college basketball. It’s easy to fall in love with everything about the kid’s game, from his passing ability to his unselfishness to the way he takes over games with his vision.

But the infatuation with Ball made a lot of people overlook Leaf, a skilled, 6-foot-10 forward who entered Saturday averaged 17.3 points, 9.0 boards and 2.5 assists. Not anymore, not after he went for 17 points, 13 boards and five assists against Kentucky. The offensive side of things wasn’t all that surprising. We knew that Leaf could score and we knew that his versatility and athleticism made him a matchup problem for opposing bigs, although maybe not to the degree that we saw on Saturday.

Where Leaf really seemed to impress was defensively. He grabbed some big rebounds and he made an impact in the paint on the road against Bam Adebayo and the No. 1 team in the country. His motor and his physical toughness stood out as much as anything, and when combined with his athleticism, length and offensive skill, he makes for an impact player and an intriguing long-term prospect. Expect to hear a lot more about him.

3. Kentucky’s issues in the half court were on display: The Wildcats are a terrific defensive team and they are terrific when their defense allows them to get out and run in transition. That’s what they’ve been able to do all season long, due in large part to the fact that they’ve been able to physically overpower everyone that they’ve played, particularly in the back court.

LEXINGTON, KY - DECEMBER 03: Thomas Welsh #40 and TJ Leaf #22 of the UCLA Bruins defend against De'Aaron Fox #0 of the Kentucky Wildcats in the second half of the game at Rupp Arena on December 3, 2016 in Lexington, Kentucky. UCLA defeated Kentucky 97-92. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
(Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

Where Kentucky has some issues is when teams force them into a half court battle. They lack shooters. De’Aaron Fox and Isaiah Briscoe combined to shoot 1-for-9 from three. Derek Willis hit a couple of triples and seems to be finally finding some footing in the rotation, but he’s also a step-down on the defensive side of the ball. What happens, then, is that teams can clog the middle, limiting what the Wildcats can do on that end of the floor. It takes away driving lanes for Fox and Briscoe and it makes it that much more difficult to get Bam Adebayo quality touches in the post.

That said …

4. … the way this game says more about UCLA than the Wildcats: The way to force Kentucky into a half court game is to score on them, and that’s a lot more difficult than in sounds. UCLA is very, very good offensively. They not only can score in transition as well as anyone, which let them get the ball through the net before Kentucky set their defense, they have a difference-maker on their roster in Ball who, quite simply, makes everyone on the team better. There are very few teams in the country that can say that they have one of those things, let alone both of them.

The bottom line?

The list of elite teams, the number of teams that can legitimately be called title contenders, just grew by one.

And that list still includes the Wildcats.

5. This may go down as the single-best win of the college basketball season: Kentucky is still awesome. They are still going to be the favorite to win the SEC. They’re still going to be a top five team all season long, and they’re still going to enter the NCAA tournament as a national title contender. None of that is going to change.

And that’s great news for UCLA.

Because they just picked up a win on the road against a team that is going to be a top five team on Selection Sunday. That’s huge, because those are the kind of wins that make a difference in seed lines. Assuming the Bruins win their league this season, having this win on their résumé is what will put them into the conversation for a No. 1 seed. With the Pac-12 looking like it may not be quite as strong as we thought – both Oregon and Arizona are in a bad way right now – it becomes even more valuable.

LEXINGTON, KY - DECEMBER 03: Lonzo Ball #2 of the UCLA Bruins reacts after making a three-point basket against the Kentucky Wildcats in the second half of the game at Rupp Arena on December 3, 2016 in Lexington, Kentucky. UCLA defeated Kentucky 97-92. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
Lonzo Ball (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

No. 25 West Virginia secures big road win at No. 6 Virginia

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA - DECEMBER 03: London Perrantes #32 of the Virginia Cavaliers dribbles the ball against Jevon Carter #2 of the West Virginia Mountaineers in the first half during a game at John Paul Jones Arena on December 3, 2016 in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Photo by Patrick McDermott/Getty Images)
(Photo by Patrick McDermott/Getty Images)
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Coming into Saturday afternoon’s game both No. 6 Virginia and No. 25 West Virginia were trying to figure some things out offensively while sticking to recent identities.

The Cavaliers could rely on their trademark stingy defense to squeeze opponents into low scores while the Mountaineers wanted to press and use their length, athleticism and depth to wear down opponents and force turnovers.

Neither team had a real go-to scorer.

And despite Virginia dictating the game’s tempo, West Virginia was able to hang around long enough and deliver the final blow to capture a 66-57 signature non-conference road win on Saturday.

West Virginia (6-1) responded after Daxter Miles Jr. was ejected in the first half for throwing an elbow at the head of Isaiah Wilkins as the Mountaineers forced enough turnovers to outlast Virginia.

With the game tied at 55 with under two minutes left, Esa Ahmad (nine points) buried the go-ahead three as the Cavaliers went cold in the final minute.

Guard Jevon Carter paced West Virginia with 11 points while Nathan Adrian finished with 10 points. West Virginia forced 14 Virginia turnovers, which isn’t a particularly high amount, but in a game with fewer possessions as Virginia tends to play (61 possessions in Saturday’s game compared to West Virginia’s averaged of 75) that is a good amount.

This is a potential signature victory for West Virginia’s NCAA tournament hopes. It also gives West Virginia a leg up as a bunch of teams are trying to jockey for position in the Big 12 as Kansas and Baylor have looked like the top two teams early in the season.

Winning at Virginia at least puts West Virginia in the conversation among the Big 12’s best teams. With the Mountaineers playing a pretty easy schedule this win was nice to have going into a stretch of winnable buy games that should inflate West Virginia’s record heading into conference play.

Virginia (7-1) jumped out to a 16-6 lead and looked like they might be able to run away with it early, but West Virginia was able to settle in and make it a slugfest. With the loss of Austin Nichols, this team is still struggling to find a guy who can get them easy buckets.

London Perrantes is more equipped to be a setup guy and Darius Thompson had some nice stretches to finish with 14 points, but he was also inconsistent and scored in bursts when the team needed a consistent shotmaker.

We know Tony Bennett’s team is going to defend all life out of you, but if the game is close and they need someone to take over the offense, they’re still seeking a go-to guy. In a deep and rugged ACC that should feature a lot of close games, this will be something to monitor.

No. 11 UCLA upsets No. 1 Kentucky in Rupp Arena

LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 03:  Head coach Steve Alford of the UCLA Bruins directs his team during the second half against the Kentucky Wildcats at Pauley Pavilion on December 3, 2015 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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Coming into the season, the thinking on UCLA was pretty simple: This is either going to be Final Four-good team or they’re going to end up crashing and burning in the NIT.

I think we have our answer.

Isaac Hamilton scored a team-high 19 points and Lonzo Ball shook off a horrid start to the game to finish with 14 points and seven assists as the No. 11 Bruins picked up the biggest win of the Steve Alford era, beating No. 1 Kentucky in Rupp Arena, 97-92.

It’s the second-straight season that the Bruins have beaten Kentucky. The Wildcats lost to UCLA in Pauley Pavilion last season.

The Bruins dug themselves a hole early, as Ball committed five of his six turnovers in the first nine minutes of the game. UCLA’s biggest and brightest star struggled early in his first true road game as a collegian. He looked rattled, making uncharacteristically bad decisions and getting lit up by De’Aaron Fox on the defensive end of the floor, and the result was that Kentucky was able to get out in transition, get some easy baskets and get themselves an early 23-14 lead.

The difference in the game ended up being a pair of overlooked players.

Sophomore guard Aaron Holiday changed the course of the game. He had all of his 13 points and each of his four assists in the first half, keeping Kentucky from getting too big of a lead and allowing Ball to grow into the game.

But the star, and the guy that could end up being what takes this UCLA team to another level, was T.J Leaf. He finished with 17 points, 13 boards and five assists. He posted a steal and a block, numbers that aren’t exactly representative of the impact he had on the interior defensively, and he and freshman Ike Anigbogu provided a toughness and an athleticism up front that we haven’t seen from UCLA in recent seasons.

“You know going into Rupp it’s going to be a crazy atmosphere and a great team. We knew that,” Leaf said after the game. “We came in, gave it our all, did a good job on the backboards and got the win.”

Anigbogu finished with a loud six points and six boards, including one sequence where he blocked Bam Adebayo’s shot at one end and threw down a put-back dunk at the other. Thomas Welsh added 14 points and eight boards. All told, the Bruins controlled the paint all afternoon, and while they gave up 92 points, their performance on the defensive end was impressive.

That’s a dangerous and talented Kentucky team, one that entered Saturday having reached triple-digits in three straight games.

And the Bruins more than held their own, getting stops when they mattered the most.

“I was really proud of the defensive stops we got when we had to get them,” Alford said in the postgame interview.

Last season, the Bruins finished 119th in KenPom’s defensive efficiency metric. They were 58th in the country entering Saturday. That’s where their Achilles’ heel is going to be. That’s where their success this season is going to be determined. Will they consistently get stops? Are they going to be better on the defensive glass, where they finished 205th last season? Can they stop penetration? Defend the rim when their guards get beaten? Hold their own against the physicality and athleticism of the best teams in the country?

On Saturday, in what could end up being their most significant test of the season, the Bruins passed with flying colors.

And the credit goes to Leaf, Anigbogu and Welsh.

Because we know what this team can do offensively. We know they can put up 97 points in a road game against a team that can defend the way Kentucky can defend. We know how many shooters they have, how they can spread the floor and how Ball can take advantage of that space and create good shots on every possession.

“This is one of the harder places to play,” Alford said. “For us to come in here and do the things we were able to do against a really good defensive team … tells me a lot about what we can do offensively.”

It also tells Alford that his team only needs to be ‘good enough’ defensively to make them a title threat.

And the most important thing that we learned on Saturday is that the Bruins are ‘good enough’.

LEXINGTON, KY - DECEMBER 03: Lonzo Ball #2 of the UCLA Bruins reacts after making a three-point basket against the Kentucky Wildcats in the second half of the game at Rupp Arena on December 3, 2016 in Lexington, Kentucky. UCLA defeated Kentucky 97-92. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
Lonzo Ball (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

PHOTO: UMKC drops one of the best special uniforms college hoops will see this year

COLUMBUS, OH - NOVEMBER 23:  Nelson Kirksey #1 of the Missouri-Kansas City Roos retrieves a loose ball against the Ohio State Buckeyes in the first half on November 23, 2012 at Value City Arena in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio State defeated UMKC 91-45.  (Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images)
(Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images)
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UMKC isn’t generally a known commodity in the college basketball world, but if you’re a fan of high-level alternate uniforms, you might want to become aware of the ‘Roos.

During the UMKC basketball doubleheader on Dec. 10 at Municipal Auditorium, both the men’s and women’s teams will wear special uniforms to honor “Kansas City Day” and the jerseys look sick.

The skyline on both the jersey and the shorts is a great touch and fans can snag these uniforms exclusively by going to the UMKC game on Dec. 10.

If you’re a fan of UMKC, or the city of Kansas City in general, this is some gear that you need to have on your radar as these are some of the best college basketball alternate uniforms that I’ve ever seen.

(H/t: Kansas City Star)

No. 13 Indiana rolls over SIU-Edwardsville 83-60

BLOOMINGTON, IN - DECEMBER 02:  Thomas Bryant #31 (left) and Juwan Morgan #13 of the Indiana Hoosiers defend Carlos Anderson #0 of the SIU Edwardsville Cougars at Assembly Hall on December 2, 2016 in Bloomington, Indiana.  (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
(Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
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BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (AP) Indiana coach Tom Crean doesn’t have a timetable for OG Anunoby’s return from a sprained ankle.

For now, the 13th-ranked Hoosiers are going to have to step up and even overcompensate on some nights to make up for the absence of one of their biggest playmakers. On Friday night, it was Juwan Morgan who answered the call.

“Juwan rebounded for two tonight,” Crean said. “He came out and brought it. When you take OG (Anunoby) out of the lineup, you take so much athleticism, versatility, you take shooting, take the rebounding, the defense out. I thought our guys tried to do a really good job of making up for that. And Juwan did even more there.”

Morgan scored a career-high 18 points on 8-for-8 shooting and finished with 10 rebounds, De’Ron Davis scored 14 points and Indiana rolled to an 83-60 victory over SIU-Edwardsville.

The Hoosiers didn’t start the game firing on all cylinders. Indiana (6-1) didn’t make its first basket until 16:12 remaining in the first half, missing its first eight attempts. Trailing 4-0, the Hoosiers shook off the slow start when Zach McRoberts hit a 3-pointer from the corner that ignited Indiana. The Hoosiers would finish the final 15 minutes of the half outscoring SIU-Edwardsville 40-17.

Led by Morgan, the Hoosiers’ efforts on the glass eliminated opportunities for SIU-Edwardsville (4-4) to score second chance points. Indiana grabbed 30 defensive rebounds. Indiana’s 15 offensive rebounds led to the Hoosiers outscoring the Cougars 17-5 in second-chance points. But the Hoosiers’ second chance points opportunities were non-existent if Morgan was shooting the ball. The sophomore didn’t miss all night, making each of his eight shot attempts and the only 3-pointer he attempted.

“I feel like I’m scratching the surface,” Morgan said. “I think just mentally I’ve been thinking too much about shooting, things like that. My teammates look to give me the ball. And I look to have big games. But it was just a good night for us as a team.”

Indiana molded the rest of the basketball game around an aggressive rebounding effort, ball movement and its depth. The Hoosiers dominated the glass, outrebounding the Cougars 45-31. Indiana’s offense revolved around ball movement, as 15 of Indiana’s 28 field goals came by way of an assist with nine Hoosiers recording at least one assist.

And the Hoosiers bench outscored SIU-Edwardsville’s 34-12.

Burak Eslik finished with 18 points for SIU-Edwardsville. SIU-Edwardsville coach Jon Harris was familiar with Crean having played for and coached with Crean while he was at Marquette. Harris called Friday night’s loss, where the Hoosiers led by as many as 33 points, disappointing.

“There’s a reason why they are ranked No. 13 in America,” Harris said. “(Indiana is) a great team. I really think they’re a high level offensive team. We let them get going and that was the difference and the separation early (in the game).”

BIG PICTURE: Anunoby watched the Hoosiers’ victory from the bench, where he sat in a walking boot. He used crutches when he entered and exited the court from the locker room. He sprained his right ankle during the Hoosiers’ 76-67 win over No. 3 North Carolina on Wednesday. On Friday night, Crean told reporters he does not believe the ankle sprain is a long-term injury that could keep Anunoby out well into Indiana’s conference schedule, despite not having a definitive timetable on Anunoby’s return.

POLL IMPLICATIONS: After a thrilling victory over No. 3 North Carolina on Wednesday night, Indiana will have two weeks before it plays a ranked opponent, when Indiana takes on No. 18 Butler at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.

UP NEXT:

SIU-Edwardsville hosts Stetson on Wednesday.

Indiana hosts Southeast Missouri State on Sunday.