Looking Back: The 2005 Recruiting Class

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Next week, the first session of July’s live recruiting period will begin, and high school hoopers around the country will take their talents to tournaments across the country, looking to impress coaches enough to earn a spot on a team at some level.

Those that are good enough will be playing for a scholarship. The best of the best will have a spot in all of the top 100 recruiting rankings on the line.

Over the course of this week, we will be looking back at the RSCI — a composite index for top 100 lists — to reinforce a point: recruiting rankings are not a guarantee. Top ten recruits flame out and unranked players make the NBA. The only thing that is a given is that hard work will be talent when talent doesn’t work hard.

Keep that in mind while tracking where a kid is ranked and who is recruiting him.

We’ll be looking at the Class of 1999-2008, the last 10 classes that have finished the five years they are allowed to use their four seasons of eligibility.

To read through the rest of our Looking Back posts, click here.

THE TOP 20*

1. Gerald Green: Green went pro out of high school and wound up getting picked 18th by the Celtics. He managed to start 26 games for Boston in his second season, but bounced between the NBA and the D-League for the next couple of seasons. Green eventually turned to Europe in 2009, but returned to the NBA in 2011 and wound up playing 60 games with the Pacers this past season.

2. Josh McRoberts: McRoberts played two underwhelming seasons at Duke before entering the NBA Draft. He was picked in the second round in 2007 and played a couple of seasons with Indiana and Portland before signing a deal with the Lakers. McRoberts’ claim to fame at this point in his career is being a part of the trade that sent Dwight Howard to the Lakers from Orlando.

3. Monta Ellis: Ellis was a high school legend in Mississippi, but the diminutive scorer skipped college and dropped to the 40th pick in the 2005 draft. Ellis developed into one of the best young scorers in the NBA with Golden State before getting traded to Milwaukee in 2012.

4. Martell Webster: Webster skipped college and was the sixth pick in the 2005 draft. He played for four seasons with Portland and a couple years with Minnesota before averaging 11.4 points in his best season as a pro in Washington this past season.

5. Andray Blatche: Blatche went pro out of prep school in Connecticut and was picked 49th by the Wizards. He lasted with Washington for seven years, even averaging 16.8 points and 8.2 boards in 2010-2011, before playing with Brooklyn this past season, but has been known for his off-court “exploits” more than anything he did on the court.

6. Tyler Hansbrough: Hansbrough was one of the bet college basketball players of all time, getting named an All-American four times, getting named the National Player of the Year as a junior and a national title as a senior. He was the 13th pick in the 2009 NBA Draft and was a productive piece for the Pacers for the last four years. Oh, and his nickname is no longer Psycho T, it’s Gooch.

7. Louis Williams: Williams went pro out of high school and was the 45th pick in the draft. He’s never developed into a superstar, but Williams has been a double-figure scorer in the league for the last six years.

8. Julian Wright: Wright played at Kansas for two seasons before heading off to the NBA Draft, where he was the 13th pick in 2007. He spent the next three seasons playing for New Orleans before latching on with Toronto for a season, but he’s been out of the league since 2011, spending a year in the D-League and a season in Israel.

9. Richard Hendrix: Hendrix went to Alabama, where he teamed up with a talented-but-disappointing team coached by Mark Gottfried. After a junior season in which he averaged 17.8 points and 10.1 boards, Hendrix went pro. He was the 49th pick in 2008, but never set foot on an NBA court.

10. Mario Chalmers: Chalmers went from Alaska to Kansas to play his college ball, where his dad was the Director of Basketball Operations while he was there, where he won a national title in 2008. Chalmers went pro after that season, getting picked in the second round by the Heat, where he has become a starter and now a two-time NBA champion.

10. Tasmin Mitchell: Mitchell had a solid four-year career at LSU, making a final four and averaging 16.8 points and 9.4 boards as a fifth-year senior. He played one season in the D-League after graduating, but has been in Israel and Russia since then.

12. Andrew Bynum: Bynum went pro out of college instead of enrolling at UConn and was picked by the Lakers with the 10th pick. He developed into a constant double-double threat, a two-time NBA champ and an all-star in 2012, but he missed all of the 2012-2013 season in Philly with an injury. He’s also out of his mind these days.

13. Brandon Rush: Rush had an excellent three-year career at Kansas, winning a national title in 2008, but went pro after his junior season. He was the 13th pick in the 2008 draft and was a solid role player for Indiana and Golden State the past five years. He tore his ACL last season, the second time he’s had that injury. He also tore his ACL in an illegal workout with the Knicks when he was considering entering the 2007 draft.

14. Keith Brumbaugh: Brumbaugh tried to enter the 2005 NBA Draft, but committed to Oklahoma State instead. He never enrolled, because of a questionable ACT score and a shoplifting arrest, and was forced to go to a JuCo after a gun charge. (His story is detailed here.) He entered the 2008 NBA Draft and played professionally until 2010. Since then, he’s been arrested at least 13 times, most recently for violation of a pretrial release stemming from a domestic violence charge.

15. CJ Miles: Miles went pro out of high school and was a second round pick by the Jazz. He bounced between the NBA and the D-League for a few years but carved himself out a career with the Jazz as a bench scorer. He played with the Cavs last season.

16. Greg Paulus: Paulus was Duke’s point guard for three and a half years before losing his starting spot to Nolan Smith. A two-sport star in high school, he transferred to Syracuse to play quarterback as a fifth-year senior. When he graduated, Paulus went into coaching and is now on staff at Ohio State.

17. Amir Johnson: Johnson went pro out of high school and ended up getting picked late in the second round by the Pistons. He spent four years in Detroit before signing with Toronto, where he had his best season of his career in 2012-2013, averaging 10.0 points and 7.5 boards.

18. Danny Green: Green’s story is well-known by now. He spent four years at North Carolina, winning the 2009 national title, before getting picked in the second round of the 2009 draft. Green bounced around between the NBA and the D-League for a couple years, even doing a stint abroad, before finally buying into the ideal of being a professional He exploded during the 2013 Playoffs with the Spurs, having a memorable five games in the 2013 Finals before going ice cold for Game 6 and Game 7.

19. Jon Brockman: Brockman was a double-double machine for four seasons at Washington before heading off to the NBA. He ended up getting picked in the second round and spent three non-descript years in the league before heading to France.

20. Brandon Costner: Costner was injured as a freshman, earning a redshirt, and averaged 16.8 points and 7.3 boards in 2006-2007. He would never repeat that production in college before entering the 2009 NBA Draft. He went undrafted, averaged 20.1 points in the D-League in 2011-2012 and, ironically enough, was a teammate of Brockman’s in France this past season.

*According to the RSCI database for 2005, Gerald Green, Andray Blatche and Brandon Rush were all rated much lower than where they should have been because one outlet — Clark Francis of The Hoop Scoop — didn’t put fifth-year seniors in his top 100 list. We’ve adjusted the rankings here to account for that. For example, Green was the No. 1 prospect by three of the four outlets that counted prep players, so he’s No. 1 on this list.

OTHER NOTABLE NAMES 

  • 22. Eric Devendorf
  • 27. Shawne Williams
  • 34. Luke Zeller
  • 41. Chris Douglas-Roberts
  • 43. Tiki Mayben
  • 44. Terrence Williams
  • 53. Jeff Adrien
  • 56. Wilson Chandler
  • 58. Sam Young
  • 61. Wesley Matthews
  • 81. Martellus Bennett
  • 84. Jeremy Pargo
  • 95. Denis Clemente
  • 98. Darren Collison
  • UR. Jimmy Graham

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Notre Dame gets commitment from four-star guard

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Mike Brey’s 2018 recruiting class just got stronger Thursday.

Notre Dame added its second four-star prospect, Robby Carmody, a 6-foot-4 guard from Pennsylvania.

“The recruiting process has been a humbling and exciting experience!” Carmody wrote on social media. “My sincerest appreciation goes out to all the coaches and schools that invested time getting to know me throughout the process.

“Today I am blessed and excited to announce that I am committing to the University of Notre Dame!”

Carmody, who just recently visited the Fighting Irish and Purdue,  joins Prentiss Hubb as the first two pieces of Brey’s 2018 class. Hubb is a 6-foot-2 guard from Washington, DC and a top-75 ranked player nationally.

The Irish will need some major pieces in 2018 after losing the likes of Bonzie Colson and Matt Farrell to graduation after this upcoming season. Notre Dame has won at least one NCAA tournament game in each of the last three seasons, making two Elite Eights during that time.

Report: Oregon’s Bigby-Williams played last season while under investigation for alleged sexual assault

AP Photo/The Register-Guard, Chris Pietsch
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An Oregon junior played all of the 2017-18 season while under investigation for alleged sexual assault, according to a report from The Daily Emerald.

Kavell Bigby-Williams was accused of sexually assaulting a female in mid-September and has been under investigation since Sept. 19, according to the report. The report states that Oregon coach Dana Altman “athletic director Rob Mullens, and other athletic department staffers were aware UOPD requested Bigby-Williams’ contact information, but nobody asked why UOPD wanted to speak to him or the nature of the case,” citing an athletic department spokesperson.

Bigby-Williams announced via social media Tuesday that he would transfer to LSU.

The news of the investigation is particularly noteworthy because Altman and Oregon came under intense scrutiny in 2014 when it became known that three players – Dominic Artis, Damyean Dotson and Brandon Austin – played in the NCAA tournament while under investigation for sexual assault. Charges against the three were ultimately dismissed.

NBC Sports’ Rob Dauster revisited the incident this past March in a column while the Ducks made their first Final Four in over 70 years, pronouncing that Altman should have lost his job over it.

The 6-foot-11, 230-pound Bigby-Williams played in all but two of Oregon’s games last season, including each of their NCAA tournament games, averaging 3 points and 2.8 rebounds in 9.8 minutes per game.

“I don’t believe Rick Pitino knew,” Boeheim says of Louisville scandal

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There’s not a lot of certainty in this world, but one of the closest things to it is college basketball coaches publicly coming to the defense of their embroiled colleagues. On Wednesday, it was Syracuse’s Jim Boeheim coming to the defense of Louisville coach Rick Pitino, whose program may be forced to vacate 108 wins and a national title due to its escort scandal.

Pitino’s refrain – one the NCAA has explicitly barred as an excuse – is that he knew nothing of the illicit activities that have gotten the Cardinals in trouble. Boeheim believes him.

“Obviously, when somebody does something like that there is going to be repercussions,” Boeheim told 104.5 FM in Albany, “and I don’t believe Rick Pitino knew about it but it still happened .. I didn’t know about somebody putting quotations in a paper at Syracuse but it happened.

“So, you know we’re going to take the hits for it. We took our hits, you know Louisville is taking their hits. I don’t like it, and there’s not much you can do about it.”

Of course, whether or not Pitino knew about it doesn’t really matter from the NCAA’s perspective. Plausible deniability is not a defense.

Pitino, who plans to appeal the decision, was suspended for the first five games of the ACC season this year. It’s Louisville’s potentially vacated title, though, that would seem to be the biggest punishment, one Boeheim, who got with with NCAA penalties in 2014, disagrees with.

“You know nobody knew they were gonna be made ineligible,” he said, “and then they’re made ineligible what? 10 years later? Or  how many years later has it been, probably not 10 but 7. Then, you know, you take away games and I think that’s difficult. I think you have to punish schools but when you start taking games away I think it’s something I don’t have the solution for but I don’t like that particular part of the punishment.”

2017 NBA Draft Preview: Which potential lottery picks will be busts?

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Over the course of the last three weeks, we’ve been churning out NBA Draft Prospect Profiles of the best players in this loaded draft for the fellas at Pro Basketball Talk.

You can find them here:

You can also find the latest NBC Sports Mock Draft here.

Today, we’ll be going through some of the projected lottery picks to determine who from that group will be a bust in the NBA.

RELATED: Lottery Busts | First Round Values | Draft Sleepers

Jonathan Isaac, Florida State: To me, Jonathan Isaac may actually be the most interesting prospect in this draft simply because no one really knows quite what to expect from him.

What I mean is that every other player projected to go in the top ten is more or less a known quantity at this point. The projected top five picks all have all-star potential, either at the point (Fultz, Ball, Fox) or as a big wing with small-ball four potential (Jackson Tatum). Malik Monk is an undersized two with explosive scoring ability. Dennis Smith Jr.’s talent is outweighed only by the red flags that come along with him. Lauri Markkanen is a seven-footer that shoots it like Klay Thompson. Zach Collins, Donovan Mitchell, Luke Kennard. We basically know what their role is going to be at the next level.

What will Isaac be?

Well, that depends on who you ask.

(Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)

Let’s start with Isaac’s potential. He stands 6-foot-11 with a 7-foot-1 wingspan and the skills to play on the perimeter. He shot 34.8 percent from three, and his 78 percent free throw shooting makes it conceivable that is his floor as a shooter in the long-term, while blocking more than two shots per 40 minutes. There isn’t a pair of skills more valuable in the NBA these days than the ability to protect the rim and stretch the floor. That’s what makes Golden State’s lineup that features Kevin Durant and Draymond Green so difficult to deal with. Throw in Isaac’s ability to move his feet and play as a switchable, multi-positional defender, and what you have is a player with a floor that’s higher than your typical 6-foot-11, 205 pound project. What’s the worst case scenario, that he’s Andre Roberson but a couple of inches taller with the ability to make a three?

So why is he headlining this bust list?

Because of where he’s being projected in the draft.

It seems pretty clear at this point who the top five picks in this year’s draft are going to be — Fultz, Ball, Tatum, Jackson and Fox. Isaac appears to be a lock to go somewhere in the top ten with quite a few people projecting him to wind up as the No. 6 pick. NBA teams aren’t exactly expecting the No. 6 pick to turn into a franchise player, but anything less than a future starter with a shot to make a couple of all-star teams would be a disappointment with that pick, particularly in a year where the draft is as good as it is in 2017.

In theory, that’s what Isaac is, right? High floor with an incredibly high ceiling if it all comes together? I’m just not convinced there’s all that much of a chance that it “all comes together” for him. Perhaps the biggest concern with Isaac when it comes to his longterm development is whether or not he realizes just how good he has the potential to be. Part of the reason he wound up at Florida State is that he didn’t want to be in the spotlight that comes with playing at a school like Kentucky or Kansas. Part of the reason he played second-fiddle offensively to the likes of Dwayne Bacon and Xavier Rathan-Mayes is that he didn’t realize he could take over games at the college level.

You don’t have to do much projecting or guessing to see Isaac playing a role and doing it effectively in the NBA, but it would be disappointing if, with the sixth pick in this draft, Orlando ended up drafting a 6-foot-11 3-and-D forward that blocks shots, makes threes and plays on the perimeter on both ends of the floor that only turned into a role player.

(Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)

Dennis Smith Jr., N.C. State: If the NBA were to draft strictly based on talent, I think that Dennis Smith Jr. would have a chance to be a top three pick in this year’s draft. He’s that good. He may be the best athlete in this draft in the back court despite battling through a torn ACL he suffered two summers ago. He can operate in pick-and-rolls. He has three-point range. He has NBA point guard size. He has the total package.

But he also played on an N.C. State team that had absolutely no business being as bad as they were last year. The Wolfpack went 15-17 overall and just 4-14 in the ACC despite having a roster that was talented enough to get them to the Sweet 16. (Yeah, I said it. And I meant it.) They were disappointing enough that head coach Mark Gottfried got fired with two weeks left in the regular season, something that just does not happen in college basketball. After N.C. State lost by 30 points to a mediocre Wake Forest team, a Wake Forest player told the media that, “We knew if we got up early on them, they was going to quit.”

Does that sound like the kind of player that you want to be the face of your franchise at the point?

Point guards are supposed to be leaders, an extension of the coach on the floor, or so goes the cliché. That becomes even more true at the college level, particularly when you’re dealing with a point guard that is so much more talented than the players around him.

Smith is good enough to put up 32 points and six assists in Cameron Indoor Stadium in a win over Duke, one of the best individual performances we saw all season long, but that still wasn’t enough to make the Wolfpack anything close to relevant at any point during the season.

Smith is going to be a lottery pick, meaning he is going to be drafted by a franchise that is going to be bad and relying on him to make them good again. That franchise might be the Knicks or the Kings. They’re going to be asking him to do what N.C. State asked him to do, and we all saw how that worked out.

What makes you believe it’s going to be different when he’s cashing those NBA paychecks?

(Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

Malik Monk, Kentucky: The concerns about Malik Monk are really quite simple: There is a reason that 6-foot-3, 180 pound shooting guards aren’t all that common in the NBA. Regardless of what he’s able to do as a shooter or just how athletic he is, the simple fact of the matter is that Monk is too small for his ideal position at the next level.

But you wouldn’t know that based on where some believe he is going to end up being picked or the hype that he had throughout his freshman season with the Wildcats. Monk is too good of a scorer not to find a way to carve out a role in the league, whether it’s as J.R. Smith as a floor-spacer, an instant-offense player off the bench a la Lou Williams or a small scoring guard on a team with a point forward like Kyrie Irving. His ability to shoot is elite, and in a league that prioritizes shooting the way the NBA prioritizes shooting, that has value.

That that value can only be capitalized on if Monk winds up in a situation that allows him to play the way he needs to play.

Justin Patton, Creighton: There are some things about Justin Patton that I really like. He’s a good athlete, he runs the floor hard, he finds himself in a good spot to catch lobs, he knows how to work as the roll-man in ball-screen actions, he’s shown off some potential as a stretch-five with flashes of perimeter skill.

What concerns me about Patton is how much his effectiveness fell off once Maurice Watson Jr., Creighton’s point guard that was having an all-american season, went down with a torn ACL. When Patton was not on the floor with an elite playmaker, he struggled to impact the game. He averaged just 9.6 boards per 40 minutes — not a good number for a 7-footer in the Big East — and while he blocked a few shots, he was often late on rotations, if he recognized them at all. I think he lacks some toughness and physicality, and he certainly needs to improve his awareness, attention to detail defensively and some of those pesky fundamentals.

Put another way, Patton’s total package includes some intriguing skills, but I’m not sure those skills fit the role he’ll need to play to last at the next level.

Jarrett Allen, Texas: Allen may have the best physical tools in this year’s draft. He’s 6-foot-11 with a 7-foot-6 wingspan, hands that look like baseball mits and enough athleticism to do things like this:

There’s no reason that he can’t find a way to be Tristan Thompson … unless he just doesn’t love playing basketball. That is a concern that NBA decision-makers have regarding Allen, which is part of the reason that a player with all of the attributes that I listed earlier may end up getting picked in the late teens or early 20s.

2017 NBA Draft Preview: Who are the sleepers that could go undrafted?

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Over the course of the last three weeks, we’ve been churning out NBA Draft Prospect Profiles of the best players in this loaded draft for the fellas at Pro Basketball Talk.

You can find them here:

You can also find the latest NBC Sports Mock Draft here.

RELATED: Lottery Busts | First Round Values | Draft Sleepers

Today, we’ll be going through some of the draft’s sleepers, players that will be picked in the second round or go undrafted that should be able to carve out an NBA career.

Cameron Oliver, Nevada: Who is the next Draymond Green?

That’s what every NBA team is looking for, right? He’s the glue that holds Golden State’s small-ball assault on the league together. A 6-foot-6 forward that is as versatile offensively as he is on the defensive end of the floor. A play maker that can hit threes. A switchable defender that can protect the rim. A junkyard dog that is as tough and competitive as anyone in professional sports.

Let’s get this out of the way: There isn’t another Draymond Green coming. The combination of skills, physical tools and mentality that he has is as unique and as special as those possessed by the likes of Kevin Durant, Steph Curry and Russell Westbrook.

But that won’t stop teams from trying to find a guy that can fit that mold, and there may not be a better fit this year than Cameron Oliver. His physical tools are elite — he’s 6-foot-8 with a 7-foot-1 wingspan, a 40″ vertical and a chiseled, 240-pound frame. He’s also one of those guys that can protect the rim on one end of the floor while spacing the court on the other end; he blocked 2.6 shots per game while shooting 38 percent from three on just under five threes per game. On paper, that’s great.

So why is he looking at potentially being a late-second round pick?

For starters, his motor is not all that great. He had a habit of coasting through games in the Mountain West, and the fact that he still managed to average 16 points and 8.7 boards should give you an idea of his talent. He’s also a guy with some question marks about his basketball IQ. People haven’t forgotten another Mountain West product — former No. 1 overall pick Anthony Bennett — that quickly.

The difference here is opportunity cost. There’s virtually no risk in snagging Oliver with a late-second round pick, and the upside is impressive.

Deonte Burton, Iowa State: Like Oliver, Burton is another multi-positional talent and freak athlete that has question marks about things that don’t involve basketball.

Let’s start with the good: Burton was, more or less, Iowa State’s Draymond Green. Playing on a team that barely had a big man to speak of, the 6-foot-5 Burton spent much of his senior season playing the five. He wasn’t bad, either, as he has a 7-foot wingspan at 6-foot-5, he’s a strong (albeit probably overweight) 265 pounds and he can protect the rim, blocking nearly two shots per 40 minutes. He runs hot and cold, but he’s a career 41 percent three-point shooter that put together some absolutely mesmerizing offensive performances this season.

There’s more: Burton was strong enough to hold his own against Caleb Swanigan in the post against Purdue in the NCAA tournament and is quick and athletic enough to switch out onto guards in pick-and-rolls … when he’s engaged. He’s a capable passer as well, and the fact that he’s left-handed certainly doesn’t hurt.

Now to the bad: Burton is not always engaged. His effort defensively and on the glass runs hot and cold, just like his jump shot. Remaining in shape has been a constant issue — he showed up to Portsmouth at 266 pounds! — and saying there are concerns about his unprofessional approach is probably the most diplomatic way to phrase it.

The issue isn’t Burton’s talent or his fit in the modern NBA. The issue is Burton himself. The potential is certainly there.

Deonte Burton (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)

Davon Reed, Miami: Reed is a 6-foot-6 wing with a 7-foot wingspan that shot nearly 40 percent from three as a senior — and 37 percent for his college career — while making the ACC all-defensive team. If that doesn’t scream 3-and-D potential, I don’t know what does. There is some concern about his ability to make contested jumpers and what he will be able to do off the dribble offensively — he has quick feet but he lacks explosiveness and burst — but his frame suggests he’ll be able to handle the physicality of the next level.

Sindarius Thornwell, South Carolina: Thornwell capped a terrific senior season with a sensational NCAA tournament run. There’s not doubting what he can be as a defender at the next level given his size (6-foot-5, 215 pounds), his length (6-foot-10 wingspan) and who he played for (Frank Martin). Thornwell also showed off the ability to make threes consistently as well as pass the ball. He’s similar to Villanova’s Josh Hart, and while he has a bit more promise as a defender he does not project as well offensively.

Frank Mason III, Kansas; Nigel Williams-Goss, Gonzaga; and Monte’ Morris, Iowa State: All three of these guys are cut from the same cloth: Smart, veteran and talented point guards that spent four years in college while putting together All-American seasons. Mason was the 2017 National Player of the Year. Williams-Goss was a First-Team All-American and led Gonzaga to the national title game. Morris spent three years in the conversation for All-American teams while posting inhuman assist-to-turnover ratios.

Like T.J. McConnell and Fred VanVleet before them, these three are good enough to carve out a role as a backup point guard on someone’s roster.

Frank Mason III vs. Monte Morris (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

Luke Kornet, Vanderbilt: Rim protection and floor-spacing. The most valuable combination of skills in the modern NBA. Luke Kornet shot 32.1 percent from three as a senior — that number was over 40 percent as a sophomore — and blocked 2.0 shots per game as a senior — a number that was down from 3.0 as a junior. That’s what will get NBA teams interested in him. The downside? He’s a slow-footed 7-footer that isn’t all that tough, that doesn’t rebound all that well and that is not all that explosive at the rim. There’s a reason he may go undrafted.

Jake Wiley, Eastern Washington: Wiley is an interesting prospect simply because his back story is so fascinating. He was a no-name recruit that played a year at Montana before quitting basketball, trying track and football, transferring to an NAIA program and, eventually, winding up dominating the Big Sky for Eastern Washington. He’s a physical specimen that blocks shots, rebounds, competes and can defend multiple positions, but he’s not a floor-spacer and is just 6-foot-7 and 215 pounds having never played above the mid-major level. Kenneth Faried made it work. Can Wiley do the same?

Rodney Pryor, Georgetown: Pryor is built in the mold of a 3-and-D wing. He’s 6-foot-5 with a 6-foot-11 wingspan and he shot 41.2 percent from three as a senior at Georgetown. He also turns 25 years old in October, meaning that he probably already is what he is going to be as a player. Is that good enough to play in the NBA? I have little doubt that Pryor will get a shot somewhere along the line to prove that it is.

V.J. Beachem, Notre Dame: Beachem is another guy whose NBA potential centers on his ability to be a 3-and-D role player. Standing 6-foot-8 with a 6-foot-11 wingspan and some hops in space, Beachem shot just under 40 percent from three during his Notre Dame career. That said, he’s not known as a great defender, he needs to add some strength to his 200 pound frame to handle the rigors of the NBA and a relatively disappointing senior season has soured some scouts on him. But the tools, they are there.