NCAA Men's Final Four - Practice

A complete breakdown of conference realignment for 2013-2014

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You know all that talk about conference realignment and schools joining new conferences and new conferences appearing out of thin air?

Remember how the Big 12 almost died and the original Big East did die before spawning a pair of shiny new conferences?

Well, quite a bit of that takes effect today, July 1st, 2013.

Since I do this for a living and I can barely keep track of who is changing to what league and when, I’ve decided to put together a breakdown to help those of you that are getting just as confused as I am.

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BIG EAST: The Big East that we were all raised on was put out of its misery as the clock struck midnight on Monday morning, and while Syracuse, Pitt and Notre Dame are all headed out the door — with Louisville close on their heels — college hoopheads still have some exciting basketball to look forward to. The new Big East (can we just call it the Big East now, no ‘new’?) will be comprised of the Catholic 7 — Marquette, Georgetown, Villanova, St. John’s, Seton Hall, Providence and DePaul — and will add Butler and Xavier from the Atlantic 10 and Creighton from the Missouri Valley.

ACC: Despite plenty of rumors to the contrary, the ACC will not actually be losing anyone this offseason. They will, however, be adding Syracuse, Pitt and Notre Dame this season. Louisville joins the ranks for the 2014-2015 season, when Maryland heads to the Big Ten.

AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE: The AAC will be a hodge-podge of castoffs and programs that no one seems to want. UConn, Cincinnati and South Florida all join from the Big East. Memphis, Central Florida, Houston and SMU arrive from Conference USA. Temple joins from the Atlantic 10. Louisville and Rutgers have a one year layover in the AAC before moving on to the ACC and the Big Ten, respectively, for the 2014-2015 season. To replace them, the AAC will ring in East Carolina, Tulsa and Tulane in 2014.

ATLANTIC 10: The A-10 will undergo some radical changes, especially at the top of the league. Temple is off to the AAC, Butler and Xavier are Big East-bound, Charlotte is headed to Conference USA, and George Mason is joining the conference from the CAA. The A-10 will also be adding Davidson for the 2014-2015 season.

CONFERENCE USA: There’s too much going on here, so we’ll jump to bullet points:

  • Teams remaining: UAB, Marshall, Rice, Southern Miss, UTEP
  • Teams joining: Charlotte (A-10), Old Dominion (CAA), Louisiana Tech, UT-San Antonio (WAC), Florida Atlantic, Florida International, Middle Tennessee, North Texas (Sun Belt)
  • Leaving in ’13-’14: Memphis, Houston, SMU, UCF
  • Leaving in ’14-’15: Tulsa, East Carolina, Tulane

Got all that?

MOUNTAIN WEST: The MWC looked like it was going to get raided. TCU had already gotten scooped up by the Big 12 via the Big East, and Boise State and San Diego State both looked like their football programs were going to force their hoops programs out of the conference. But the Big East imploded, so both the Broncos and the Aztecs remain. Plus, the MWC added Utah State — who has a great basketball program — and San Jose State from the WAC.

WAC: After Idaho leaves for the Big Sky in 2014-2015, the only two WAC programs left will be New Mexico State and Seattle, and Seattle joined the conference in 2012. They will be filling out a hoops roster, however: Utah Valley, UT-Pan American, Chicago State (Great West), UMKC (Summit), Cal St-Bakersfield (Independents), and Grand Canyon (Division II) all join the league.

SUN BELT: Florida Atlantic, Florida International, Middle Tennessee, and North Texas are all headed to Conference USA, but they will be replaced by Georgia State, UT-Arlington and Texas State.

CAA: After losing VCU, the CAA will lose George Mason (A-10), Old Dominion (CUSA) and Georgia State (Sun Belt) this offseason. They do bring in the College of Charleston, however.

HORIZON: The Horizon League loses Loyola-Chicago to the MVC, but replaces them with Oakland from the Summit League.

SUMMIT: The Summit League loses Oakland and UMKC (who is headed to the WAC), but they did bring in a good Denver program from the WAC.

MISSOURI VALLEY: The MVC takes a hit with Creighton leaving for the Big East, but they get replaced by Loyola-Chicago, bringing in the league’s first major metropolitan area.

WCC: The WCC adds Pacific as their 10th member. Pacific comes from the Big West, who tried to replace them with San Diego State.

MAAC: The MAAC will lose Loyola (MD) to the Patriot League, but they somehow managed to hang on to Iona and Siena, arguably the two most desired programs in the league, while adding Quinnipiac and Monmouth from the NEC.

PATRIOT: The Patriot League was one of the big winners in realignment, adding both Boston U. (from the America East) and Loyola (MD) (from the MAAC).

AMERICA EAST: They lose BU to the Patriot, but add UMass-Lowell from the Division II ranks.

SOCON: The only change this season will be that the SoCon is losing the College of Charleston to the CAA, but next year Davidson will be headed out the door and on to the Atlantic 10.

SOUTHLAND: The Southland scooped up a bunch of the low-major leftovers from realignment, adding Houston Baptist from the Great West, New Orleans from the Independents and Division I newcomers Abilene Christian and Incarnate Word.

Here’s a full list of the schools changing leagues this year:

  • Abilene Christian: Division II to the Southland
  • Boston U.: America East to the Patriot League
  • Butler: Atlantic 10 to the Big East
  • Cal St-Bakersfield: Independent to the WAC
  • Central Florida: Conference USA to the AAC
  • Charleston: SoCon to the CAA
  • Charlotte: Atlantic 10 to Conference USA
  • Chicago State: Great West to the WAC
  • Cincinnati: Big East to the AAC
  • UConn: Big East to the AAC
  • Creighton: Missouri Valley to the Big East
  • Denver: WAC to the Summit
  • FAU: Sun Belt to Conference USA
  • FIU: Sun Belt to Conference USA
  • George Mason: CAA to the Atlantic 10
  • Georgia State: CAA to the Sun Belt
  • Grand Canyon: Division II to the WAC
  • Houston: Conference USA to the AAC
  • Houston Baptist: Great West to the Southland
  • Incarnate Word: Division II to the Southland
  • Louisiana Tech: WAC to Conference USA
  • Loyola-Chicago: Horizon to the MVC
  • Loyola (MD): MAAC to the Patriot
  • UMass-Lowell: Division II to the America East
  • Memphis: Conference USA to the AAC
  • MTSU: Sun Belt to Conference USA
  • UMKC: Summit to the WAC
  • Monmouth: NEC to the MAAC
  • NJIT: Great West to Independent
  • New Orleans: Independent to the Southland
  • North Texas: Sun Belt to Conference USA
  • Notre Dame: Big East to the ACC
  • Oakland: Summit to the Horizon
  • Old Dominion: CAA to Conference USA
  • Pacific: Big West to the WCC
  • Pitt: Big East to the ACC
  • Quinnipiac: NEC to the MAAC
  • San Jose State: WAC to the MWC
  • SMU: Conference USA to the AAC
  • South Florida: Big East to the AAC
  • Syracuse: Big East to the ACC
  • Temple: Atlantic 10 to the AAC
  • UT-Arlington: WAC to the Sun Belt
  • UT-Pan American: Great West to the WAC
  • UT-San Antonio: WAC to Conference USA
  • Texas State: WAC to the Sun Belt
  • Utah State: WAC to the MWC
  • Utah Valley: Great West to the WAC
  • Xavier: Atlantic 10 to the Big East

VIDEO: Lonzo Ball caps crazy first half with 30-footer

LEXINGTON, KY - DECEMBER 03: Lonzo Ball #2 of the UCLA Bruins reacts after making a three-point basket against the Kentucky Wildcats in the second half of the game at Rupp Arena on December 3, 2016 in Lexington, Kentucky. UCLA defeated Kentucky 97-92. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
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No. 2 UCLA and Michigan are stuck in the middle of an absolute shootout.

At halftime in Pauley Pavilion, the score is tied at 50 after the two teams combined to shoot 22-for-30 from three.

Seriously.

The highlight?

Ball capping the first half with a three from the logo:

PHOTO: Bryce Harper visits the Duke locker room

Head coach Mike Krzyzewski of the Duke Blue Devils reacts in the second half against the Yale Bulldogs during the second round of the 2016 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Dunkin' Donuts Center on March 19, 2016 in Providence, Rhode Island.  (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)
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Duke embarrassed UNLV in Las Vegas on Saturday afternoon.

Not only did they beat the Runnin’ Rebels 94-45, but they made sure that UNLV was on the receiving end of what will probably go down as the best dunk of the college basketball season.

(No, seriously, you need to see what Grayson Allen did.)

After the game, Duke had a special visitor in their locker room: soon-to-be free agent Bryce Harper, who seems destined to break the hearts of Washington Nationals fans when he leaves D.C. for the Yankees. I’m sure this will only boost his popularity in a city that loves the Maryland Terrapins:

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via @DukeMBB

No. 15 West Virginia struggles early, beats VMI 90-55

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 25:  Tarik Phillip #12 of the West Virginia Mountaineers talks with head coach Bob Huggins of the West Virginia Mountaineers against the Temple Owls in the second half during the championship game of the NIT Season Tip-Off at Barclays Center on November 25, 2016 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.  (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
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MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) It took nine games for West Virginia’s Daxter Miles Jr. to start to find a rhythm.

Miles scored a season-high 20 points and the 15th-ranked Mountaineers overcame an early lull to beat VMI 90-55 on Saturday and give coach Bob Huggins his 799th career win.

Miles missed the first three games with an unspecified illness and was ejected for throwing an elbow in the first half of a close win over Virginia last Saturday. The lack of court time set him back on a team where a dozen players are getting extensive minutes.

Against VMI, the junior went 6 of 9 from the field, including 5 of 6 from 3-point range.

“It feels good,” Miles said. “I just had to get back into the basic of things, and just whatever it takes me to do. Did I feel like it was my time? No. Everybody has roles and we all kind of know what each other likes to do.”

West Virginia (8-1) followed up a 53-point win over Western Carolina on Wednesday night with a lackluster first half to finish its final exams week.

VMI (1-7) accomplished what no other mid-major opponent has done in the first half this season – handle West Virginia’s full-court pressure defense and keep up in scoring for a while.

The Keydets lost by 18 points at home to Gardner-Webb in their last game but were scrappy out of the gate against the often-substituting Mountaineers.

After falling behind by 16, the Keydets were within 22-17 before Miles made two 3-pointers, and Elijah Macon’s free throw with 4 minutes left until halftime put the Mountaineers ahead by double digits for good, 32-22.

“I thought we competed, especially for the first 25 minutes,” VMI coach Dan Earl said. “I give West Virginia a ton of credit. They come at you for 40 minutes. They wore us down a little bit.”

Esa Ahmad added 12 points and Brandon Watkins had a season-high 11 points and grabbed 10 rebounds for West Virginia.

QJ Peterson scored 17 points for VMI, which was limited to three field goals over the final 12 minutes of the game.

BIG PICTURE

VMI: The Keydets might win more games if they match the intensity that they had midway through the first half, when they went on an 11-0 run, including seven points by Peterson, who led West Virginia’s Hedgesville High School to a state championship in 2012.

West Virginia: The Mountaineers lead the nation in forced turnovers with 26.5 per game, including at least 34 turnovers in two of their last three games. Two years ago VMI committed 36 against them. But the defensive effort wasn’t there from start-to-finish Saturday for West Virginia, which forced 22.

“Twenty-two forced turnovers to most people is good,” Huggins said. “And we’re looking at it like we should’ve had some more.”

ADRIAN SLUMPING

The Mountaineers haven’t gotten much production lately out of Nathan Adrian, who no longer is the team’s top scorer after getting two points each against Western Carolina and VMI.

POLL IMPLICATIONS

West Virginia should move up in the AP poll after No. 12 Saint Mary’s and No. 13 Xavier lost earlier in the week.

CHARITY CLANK

West Virginia isn’t going to win many games at the free throw line. The Mountaineers are shooting 66 percent from the line this season and went 26 of 42 (62 percent) on Saturday. They fared better from 3-point range, going 10 of 19.

UP NEXT

VMI: Hosts Charleston Southern on Tuesday.

West Virginia: Can give Huggins his 800th win when it hosts Missouri-Kansas City next Saturday.

More AP college basketball: http://www.collegebasketball.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP-Top25.

No. 3 Jayhawks cruise to 89-72 victory over Nebraska

LAWRENCE, KS - DECEMBER 10: Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk #10 of the Kansas Jayhawks shoots against Evan Taylor #11 of the Nebraska Cornhuskers in the first half at Allen Field House on December 10, 2016 in Lawrence, Kansas. (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)
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LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) Kansas coach Bill Self and Nebraska coach Tim Miles exchanged a few humorous words after the third-ranked Jayhawks rolled to an 89-72 victory over their former Big 12 foe on Saturday.

Turns out Miles was giving him a little jab.

“Come on, what do you have to complain about? Nothing,” Miles said, recalling their light-hearted conversation. “Sorry, the cheerleaders’ little thing on their pompom fell on the floor. You got it tough.”

Indeed, Self had just spent most of the afternoon riding the officials and riding his players.

Basically, spoiling for a fight.

But from Miles’ perspective, there wasn’t much reason: The Jayhawks made it look easy.

“I thought the first half we were really good, we were really solid. The second half we weren’t,” Self said. “We didn’t guard anybody, but the first half was good, so we’ll dwell on the positive.

“That’s what I always choose to do,” he added with a wry grin, “dwell on the positive.”

Frank Mason III had 18 points and seven assists without a turnover. Josh Jackson had 17 points and Svi Mykhailiuk added 15. Devonte Graham scored 14 and kept everybody calm. Landen Lucas was 5 for 5 from the field and finished with 12 points to give Kansas (9-1) an inside presence.

The result was a blowout despite the absence of forward Carlton Bragg Jr., who is suspended following his arrest Friday for misdemeanor battery. The part-time starter spent the game in street clothes.

“I don’t know anything more than I knew yesterday, which is very little,” Self said. “It’s not anything that’s worth commenting on because there’s no decisions to be made as far as finality goes until you hear what transpired, and certainly I’m sure people are trying to figure it out.”

Tai Webster led Nebraska (5-5) with 22 points. Ed Morrow Jr. finished with 16.

“Yeah, it was rough,” Webster said, “a tough environment to come into. The crowd is nothing like we’ve seen before, but they’re good at what they do. They pressure you full-court, every time you take it out, and they’re relentless. They’re tough.”

The Jayhawks rolled to a 54-34 halftime lead, but things started to go haywire after the break. They missed eight of their first 11 free throws in the second half, allowing Nebraska to claw back into the game.

What really set Self off, though, came with about 12 minutes left, when Mykhailiuk tracked down a loose ball and tried to throw an alley-oop pass to Jackson off the glass. Jackson’s dunk hit the rim and sprung into the air – and sent Self springing from his seat with an R-rated roar.

Asked who earned the brunt for it, Jackson or Mykhailiuk, Lucas chimed in: “Everybody on the court.”

It was Jackson who responded, though. He scored the next two baskets, then converted an emphatic jam, as the Jayhawks pushed their lead back to 20 and coasted the rest of the way.

“That’s a fast team, a skilled team, a powerful team. They can get you a lot of ways,” Miles said. “I was really proud of our guys. I thought the second half we showed some toughness, some resiliency to at least claw back and make it uneasy on them.”

BIG PICTURE

Nebraska has lost five of six, including a blowout loss to No. 10 Creighton. The only win for Miles’ struggling team during that stretch came against South Dakota.

Kansas finished 14 of 25 from the free throw line, continuing a troubling trend. Jackson was 3 of 8, while Udoka Azubuike clanked three of his four attempts off the rim.

BRAGG BENCHED

The Jayhawks’ sophomore forward pleaded not guilty to a charge of misdemeanor battery after allegedly pushing his girlfriend down a flight of stairs. Bragg had appeared in their first nine games, starting five of them, and is averaging 7.8 points and 5.3 rebounds in 16 minutes.

“I think one reason why in the first half we were more focused was because of it. I don’t know,” Self said. “But they seemed to be pretty focused in the first half, but it was a distraction, and with teams and throughout seasons, there’s going to be different things come up.”

UP NEXT

Nebraska returns home to play Gardner-Webb on Dec. 18.

Kansas plays Davidson on Dec. 17 at the Sprint Center in Kansas City, Missouri.

More AP college basketball: http://www.collegebasketball.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP-Top25.

No. 11 Louisville runs away from Texas Southern 102-71

LOUISVILLE, KY - DECEMBER 10:  Quentin Snider #4 of the Louisville Cardinals dribbles the ball during the game against the Texas Southern Tigers at KFC YUM! Center on December 10, 2016 in Louisville, Kentucky.  (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) Rick Pitino graciously acknowledged the latest milestone in his Hall of Fame career with the hope his Louisville Cardinals grow from the tougher-than-expected win that required overcoming some deficiencies.

Quentin Snider scored 15 points, V.J. King added 13 and No. 11 Louisville overcame a cold shooting start to beat Texas Southern 102-71 on Saturday and give Pitino his 400th victory as the Cardinals’ coach.

Pitino, who last month earned his 750th career college victory, improved to 400-163 in his 16th season with Louisville. His Cardinals (9-1) first had to shake off early sluggishness and a 4-for-21 start from the field to pull away from the scrappy, athletic Tigers and win their fourth in a row.

They also had to overcome a rebounding clinic conducted by Texas Southern’s Derrick Griffin, who grabbed 26 of his team’s 49 boards to establish as NCAA Division I high for this season. His performance included 15 offensive rebounds that helped the Tigers make things tense for 25 minutes before Louisville slowly pulled away.

“Well, congratulations to Derrick Griffin because that was an amazing rebounding performance,” said Pitino, whose team edged the Tigers by two rebounds overall. “Happy with the victory, but when you can learn lessons in victory rather than defeat, like the Baylor game, it helps you a lot. … It was good tonight because those guys got taken to the woodshed on the glass, and they’ll learn a valuable lesson.”

Louisville made 30 of its final 57 shots (53 percent) to finish at 44 percent from the field overall while holding TSU (4-5) to 35 percent. Snider’s first double-figure game scoring in four contests set the tone followed by five teammates.

Donovan Mitchell had 12 points, Jaylen Johnson and Deng Adel 11 each and Mangok Mathiang 10 for Louisville.

Freshman point guard Demontrae Jefferson debuted with 27 points for Texas Southern, which lost its fourth straight. Dulani Robinson added 16 points and Griffin had 15 for the Tigers.

Griffin didn’t seem fazed by his rebounding performance.

“Playing defense was key,” said the 6-foot-7 sophomore, last season’s Southwestern Athletic Conference Player of the Year and this year’s preseason choice. “That’s what we focus on, and our offense comes from our defense.”

THE BIG PICTURE

Texas Southern: The 5-7 Jefferson entered as a four-star prospect and with just one practice but delivered on high expectations with strong court leadership and 10 first-half points. Griffin helped the Tigers stay close on the boards with Louisville but had no bench to keep up with the Cardinals, being shut out 21-0 in the first half and outscored 43-8 overall.

“They’re just so physical,” coach Mike Davis said of Louisville. “Because of that, a turnover here, a missed shot there would’ve been different but it would’ve been hard for us to sustain our play for 40 minutes.”

Louisville: Three days after thriving against Southern Illinois, the Cardinals’ frontcourt struggled early against TSU as Mathiang and Ray Spalding each picked up two fouls. Fortunately for Louisville, Snider picked things up while Adel and King added timely baskets.

POLL IMPLICATIONS

Louisville: The Cardinals have had a good week with lopsided wins that should keep them near the top 10.

ROAD TESTED

Texas Southern won’t debut at home until Jan. 14 against Grambling and their next four games are at No. 22 Cincinnati, LSU, TCU and No. 4 Baylor, which handed Louisville its first loss last month. Davis said he created the challenging road docket to prepare his team for league play and hopefully win a third straight SWAC regular season title.

“We’re not focused on the outcome right now. we’re focused on the outcome in March,” he said. “I’d rather show them a great hotel, eat really well, play in a game they’ll be able to see on TV one day with the family than to play a home game in front of a few hundred people and it cost us money. If they understand the challenges now, it’ll help them in the real world.”

UP NEXT

Texas Southern: The Tigers’ stretch of 16 road games to open the season continues Tuesday at No. 22 Cincinnati.

Louisville: Hosts Eastern Kentucky on Dec. 17. Pitino reunites with second-year Colonels coach Dan McHale, who was a Cardinals staff assistant and former video director.

More AP College Basketball: http://www.collegebasketball.ap.org