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A complete breakdown of conference realignment for 2013-2014

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You know all that talk about conference realignment and schools joining new conferences and new conferences appearing out of thin air?

Remember how the Big 12 almost died and the original Big East did die before spawning a pair of shiny new conferences?

Well, quite a bit of that takes effect today, July 1st, 2013.

Since I do this for a living and I can barely keep track of who is changing to what league and when, I’ve decided to put together a breakdown to help those of you that are getting just as confused as I am.

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BIG EAST: The Big East that we were all raised on was put out of its misery as the clock struck midnight on Monday morning, and while Syracuse, Pitt and Notre Dame are all headed out the door — with Louisville close on their heels — college hoopheads still have some exciting basketball to look forward to. The new Big East (can we just call it the Big East now, no ‘new’?) will be comprised of the Catholic 7 — Marquette, Georgetown, Villanova, St. John’s, Seton Hall, Providence and DePaul — and will add Butler and Xavier from the Atlantic 10 and Creighton from the Missouri Valley.

ACC: Despite plenty of rumors to the contrary, the ACC will not actually be losing anyone this offseason. They will, however, be adding Syracuse, Pitt and Notre Dame this season. Louisville joins the ranks for the 2014-2015 season, when Maryland heads to the Big Ten.

AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE: The AAC will be a hodge-podge of castoffs and programs that no one seems to want. UConn, Cincinnati and South Florida all join from the Big East. Memphis, Central Florida, Houston and SMU arrive from Conference USA. Temple joins from the Atlantic 10. Louisville and Rutgers have a one year layover in the AAC before moving on to the ACC and the Big Ten, respectively, for the 2014-2015 season. To replace them, the AAC will ring in East Carolina, Tulsa and Tulane in 2014.

ATLANTIC 10: The A-10 will undergo some radical changes, especially at the top of the league. Temple is off to the AAC, Butler and Xavier are Big East-bound, Charlotte is headed to Conference USA, and George Mason is joining the conference from the CAA. The A-10 will also be adding Davidson for the 2014-2015 season.

CONFERENCE USA: There’s too much going on here, so we’ll jump to bullet points:

  • Teams remaining: UAB, Marshall, Rice, Southern Miss, UTEP
  • Teams joining: Charlotte (A-10), Old Dominion (CAA), Louisiana Tech, UT-San Antonio (WAC), Florida Atlantic, Florida International, Middle Tennessee, North Texas (Sun Belt)
  • Leaving in ’13-’14: Memphis, Houston, SMU, UCF
  • Leaving in ’14-’15: Tulsa, East Carolina, Tulane

Got all that?

MOUNTAIN WEST: The MWC looked like it was going to get raided. TCU had already gotten scooped up by the Big 12 via the Big East, and Boise State and San Diego State both looked like their football programs were going to force their hoops programs out of the conference. But the Big East imploded, so both the Broncos and the Aztecs remain. Plus, the MWC added Utah State — who has a great basketball program — and San Jose State from the WAC.

WAC: After Idaho leaves for the Big Sky in 2014-2015, the only two WAC programs left will be New Mexico State and Seattle, and Seattle joined the conference in 2012. They will be filling out a hoops roster, however: Utah Valley, UT-Pan American, Chicago State (Great West), UMKC (Summit), Cal St-Bakersfield (Independents), and Grand Canyon (Division II) all join the league.

SUN BELT: Florida Atlantic, Florida International, Middle Tennessee, and North Texas are all headed to Conference USA, but they will be replaced by Georgia State, UT-Arlington and Texas State.

CAA: After losing VCU, the CAA will lose George Mason (A-10), Old Dominion (CUSA) and Georgia State (Sun Belt) this offseason. They do bring in the College of Charleston, however.

HORIZON: The Horizon League loses Loyola-Chicago to the MVC, but replaces them with Oakland from the Summit League.

SUMMIT: The Summit League loses Oakland and UMKC (who is headed to the WAC), but they did bring in a good Denver program from the WAC.

MISSOURI VALLEY: The MVC takes a hit with Creighton leaving for the Big East, but they get replaced by Loyola-Chicago, bringing in the league’s first major metropolitan area.

WCC: The WCC adds Pacific as their 10th member. Pacific comes from the Big West, who tried to replace them with San Diego State.

MAAC: The MAAC will lose Loyola (MD) to the Patriot League, but they somehow managed to hang on to Iona and Siena, arguably the two most desired programs in the league, while adding Quinnipiac and Monmouth from the NEC.

PATRIOT: The Patriot League was one of the big winners in realignment, adding both Boston U. (from the America East) and Loyola (MD) (from the MAAC).

AMERICA EAST: They lose BU to the Patriot, but add UMass-Lowell from the Division II ranks.

SOCON: The only change this season will be that the SoCon is losing the College of Charleston to the CAA, but next year Davidson will be headed out the door and on to the Atlantic 10.

SOUTHLAND: The Southland scooped up a bunch of the low-major leftovers from realignment, adding Houston Baptist from the Great West, New Orleans from the Independents and Division I newcomers Abilene Christian and Incarnate Word.

Here’s a full list of the schools changing leagues this year:

  • Abilene Christian: Division II to the Southland
  • Boston U.: America East to the Patriot League
  • Butler: Atlantic 10 to the Big East
  • Cal St-Bakersfield: Independent to the WAC
  • Central Florida: Conference USA to the AAC
  • Charleston: SoCon to the CAA
  • Charlotte: Atlantic 10 to Conference USA
  • Chicago State: Great West to the WAC
  • Cincinnati: Big East to the AAC
  • UConn: Big East to the AAC
  • Creighton: Missouri Valley to the Big East
  • Denver: WAC to the Summit
  • FAU: Sun Belt to Conference USA
  • FIU: Sun Belt to Conference USA
  • George Mason: CAA to the Atlantic 10
  • Georgia State: CAA to the Sun Belt
  • Grand Canyon: Division II to the WAC
  • Houston: Conference USA to the AAC
  • Houston Baptist: Great West to the Southland
  • Incarnate Word: Division II to the Southland
  • Louisiana Tech: WAC to Conference USA
  • Loyola-Chicago: Horizon to the MVC
  • Loyola (MD): MAAC to the Patriot
  • UMass-Lowell: Division II to the America East
  • Memphis: Conference USA to the AAC
  • MTSU: Sun Belt to Conference USA
  • UMKC: Summit to the WAC
  • Monmouth: NEC to the MAAC
  • NJIT: Great West to Independent
  • New Orleans: Independent to the Southland
  • North Texas: Sun Belt to Conference USA
  • Notre Dame: Big East to the ACC
  • Oakland: Summit to the Horizon
  • Old Dominion: CAA to Conference USA
  • Pacific: Big West to the WCC
  • Pitt: Big East to the ACC
  • Quinnipiac: NEC to the MAAC
  • San Jose State: WAC to the MWC
  • SMU: Conference USA to the AAC
  • South Florida: Big East to the AAC
  • Syracuse: Big East to the ACC
  • Temple: Atlantic 10 to the AAC
  • UT-Arlington: WAC to the Sun Belt
  • UT-Pan American: Great West to the WAC
  • UT-San Antonio: WAC to Conference USA
  • Texas State: WAC to the Sun Belt
  • Utah State: WAC to the MWC
  • Utah Valley: Great West to the WAC
  • Xavier: Atlantic 10 to the Big East

UNLV’s Stephen Zimmerman out with a knee injury

UNLV forward Stephen Zimmerman Jr. shoots against San Diego State during an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016, in Las Vegas. (L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
(L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
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The injury Stephen Zimmerman suffered on Saturday will keep the star UNLV freshman out for at least a week, a source told NBC Sports.

The injury is not thought to be serious, however. Zimmerman may be kept out for longer as a precaution, but that’s a result of the Runnin’ Rebels being in a situation where the rest of their regular season is relatively meaningless.

They’re not getting an at-large bid to the NCAA tournament regardless of how they finish out league play. With back-up center Ben Carter out with a torn ACL, it’s more important to make sure that Zimmerman, who is averaging 10.6 points and 9.1 boards this season, is totally healthy for the Mountain West tournament.

That tournament, mind you, will be played at UNLV’s Thomas & Mack Center.

So the Runnin’ Rebels, regardless of how poor they’ve played this season, will always have a chance to land an automatic bid.

Anyway, the more interesting aspect of this story is how Zimmerman injured the knee. It was a completely avoidable play that came after the whistle, but I’m not sure it was what you would call a “dirty play”. You tell me:

VIDEO: Buddy Hield is ‘all money’ on game-winning three vs. No. 24 Texas

Oklahoma guard Buddy Hield (24) takes a shot over Oklahoma State forward Chris Oliver during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Stillwater, Okla., Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Brody Schmidt)
(AP Photo/Brody Schmidt)
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With a little more than three minutes left on Monday night, No. 24 Texas held a 57-51 lead on No. 3 Oklahoma in Norman as Jordan Woodard struggled again and Buddy Hield failed to find the rhythm that he had throughout the first three months of the season.

At that point in the game, Hield was 4-for-14 from the floor with 15 points and four turnovers. He had just missed a pair of wide-open threes

“I couldn’t make a shot,” Hield said after the game. But that changed down the stretch. First, Hield finally got a three to drop. On the next possession, he got all the way to the rim and scored. On the following two possessions, he was fouled on a drive to the rim and hit four free throws. And after missing a pull-up jumper, Hield did this:

“I told coach I wanted the ball,” Hield said, “I saw Lammert coming to bite, so I pulled up.”

“It’s all money.”

Hield is already the favorite to win National Player of the Year, and this performance is only going to help his cause further. Think about it like this: Buddy was not good on Monday night, at least according to his (admittedly lofty) standards. But he still finished with 27 points and shook off a cold shooting night just in time to take over down the stretch.

Now think about this: Hield’s head coach has enough confidence in him to hand him the keys in the final minutes despite the fact that he’s struggling and on a team that has two other players that Lon Kruger trusts on game-winning possessions. Think about it. When Oklahoma beat West Virginia at the buzzer, it was Jordan Woodard that the play was drawn up for. When they beat LSU, it was Isaiah Cousins that got the rock on the final possession while Hield was used as a decoy. .

Want to talk about coaching luxuries?

Kruger has three guards that can shoot, penetrate and score, and penetrate and kick, and one of them is the National Player of the Year that doesn’t mind being used as a decoy.