John Swofford

Judge dismisses part of Maryland’s suit against the ACC


One aspect of conference realignment that tends to get overlooked is what happens in the courtroom. More often than not such moves result in dueling lawsuits with the two parties eventually coming to some kind of resolution.

When Maryland announced its decision to leave the ACC for the Big Ten, the ACC responded by filing a lawsuit in a North Carolina court to ensure that they’ll receive the full exit fee (in upwards of nearly $53 million) they expect from the school.

Maryland responded by filing its own suit in a Prince George’s County (Md.) court, and on Friday the judge presiding over the case issued a ruling that likely benefits the ACC.

Judge John Paul Davey dismissed a small portion of Maryland’s suit, accepting the conference’s argument that both suits “should not proceed simultaneously because they were too similar to be treated independently.”

Davey stayed the rest of Maryland’s suit pending the outcome of the North Carolina case, in which preliminary motions have been filed.

“The  decision of the North Carolina Court and the decision by this Court could be similar to one another, could directly compete with one another, and/or could leave unresolved issues,” the judge said in a 36-page opinion.

“Permitting both matters to proceed simultaneously plainly risks inconsistent and/or competing determinations of fact and law, an outcome this Court seeks to avoid,” his opinion said.

Three of the four counts remain, with the lone count dismissed focusing on Maryland’s claim that its “economic and competitive standing” was harmed by leaving the ACC. Davey stated in court according to Jeff Barker of the Baltimore Sun that the school publicly stated that its standing would be enhanced by the move to the Big Ten.

For all the posturing that occurs in conference realignment, these issued tend to get worked out in the end because it does no one any good to delay the inevitable. With Maryland being the first school to leave the ACC in this current era, maybe the ACC was attempting to use the school as an example to its remaining members when it filed last year.

But with the grant of rights agreement the remaining ACC schools agreed to sign back in April, the conference’s future is far more secure.

Raphielle can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

Tennessee G Hubbs undergoes arthroscopic knee surgery

Robert Hubbs III, Anton Beard
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KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) Tennessee guard Robert Hubbs won’t practice this week after undergoing arthroscopic surgery on his right knee on Tuesday.

The school said in a news release that Hubbs had it done “to address chronic swelling issues that have been present since the preseason.”

No timetable has been set for when Hubbs could return to action, but he is considered doubtful for Tennessee’s next game on Dec. 12 at Butler. Tennessee (4-3) is in the midst of a 13-day break from games, which marks the program’s longest layoff during a season since December 1967.

Hubbs is averaging 15.3 points per game to rank third on the team. The 6-foot-4 junior has scored at least 13 points in each of Tennessee’s seven games.

Clemson lands 2017 guard

Brad Brownell
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Clemson landed a quality commitment on Tuesday as Class of 2017 guard A.J. Oliver committed to the Tigers. The son of Clemson women’s head coach Audra Smith, Oliver is regarded as a three-star prospect, according to Rivals, although some others view him as a top-100 caliber player.

The 6-foot-4 Oliver attends nearby Daniel High School and should have some time to get acclimated with the players and coaches before he sets foot on campus. A versatile guard who plays hard, Oliver showed that he can make plays with the ball in his hands this summer with the Upward Stars.

Oliver is Clemson’s first commitment in the Class of 2017 and it’s a strong start for head coach Brad Brownell.