Andre Drummond, Damian Lillard, Anthony Davis

Report shows success of NBA first round picks since 2003


Two days before the 2013 NBA Draft and Syracuse point guard Michael Carter-Williams is projected as a lottery pick. In recent years, fellow Orange first round picks such as Jonny Flynn, Wesley Johnson and Fab Melo have given the impression that Jim Boeheim may not be the best at developing players for stardom in the NBA.

Chris Carlson at the Post-Standard wanted to show that the Hall of Fame coach isn’t a poor developer of NBA talent, and to do so he compiled all 12 programs since 2003 that have sent six or more players in the first round. He broke them into two categories — players with above-average player efficiency rating (PER) and players with below-average PER. He used the average PER, which is 15 according to, as a way to separate the two categories.

Below is the chart that shows the success based on PER:


Before Kansas fans take to the comment section, Carlson acknowledges that although players like Nick Collison and Kirk Hinrich fall before the average of 15, he would consider their careers as successes. Even so, Andrew Wiggins will likely help Kansas’ ranking in the next few years.

This chart was mainly to show that Syracuse is among several programs that have had first round picks fail to pan out in the association.

Top 10 picks that have below-average career PERs:

Syracuse: Jonny Flynn (11.3 PER in 163 games) and Wes Johnson (9.5 PER in 195)
Duke: Shelden Williams (12.5 PER in 361) and Austin Rivers (5.9 PER in 61)
BYU: Jimmer Fredette (12.5 PER in 130) and Rafael Araujo (6.3 PER in 139)
Kansas: Thomas Robinson (10.9 PER in 70), Kirk Hinrich (13.6 in 694)
North Carolina: Marvin Williams (13.5 PER in 560), Harrison Barnes (11 in 81)

Take this study as you will, but it does prove one thing: the NBA is a tough league.

“It’s hard,” Boeheim told the Post-Standard. “You can be a good college player and just not make the NBA. It’s very difficult to do. Guys that people think will make it don’t make it. It’s not easy. There’s are more good players now, not necessarily impact players, but more good players in the NBA. More pretty good players.”

Terrence is also the lead writer at and can be followed on Twitter: @terrence_payne

Illinois’ injury woes continue as starting center needs knee surgery

George Niang,Abdel Nader,Mike Thorne, Jr.
AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser
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Illinois suffered another blow in what has already turned out to be a brutal season.

Mike Thorne is expected to miss the rest of the season after tearing his meniscus. He reportedly underwent surgery on Monday to repair the injury.

Thorne, a transfer from Charlotte, was starting at center for the Illini and doing a good job of it as well. He was averaging 13.4 points and 8.4 boards, although Illinois has started off the season 3-4.

The reason for that slow start has mainly been those injuries. Tracy Abrams is already out for the season after tearing his achilles, and the Illini training room looked like a M.A.S.H. unit. Kendrick Nunn just returned two games ago from surgery to repair a torn thumb ligament. LeRon Black is still getting back to speed after offseason knee surgery. Jaylon Tate is back after dislocating a finger. Jalen Coleman-Lands was slowed by a stress fracture.

John Groce entered this season on the hot seat, and dealing with all of these injuries certainly isn’t helping his cause.

NEW PODCAST: Recapping Feast Week

Kris Dunn
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We talk about a lot of stuff of the podcast today, mainly because a lot of stuff happened since we last spoke with you all.

For starters, we need to discuss the ‘realness’ of Syracuse and Xavier. Are they both truly top 15 teams, or do they just have top 15 resumes? We also dive into Chris Mack’s epic troll-job of Dayton at the Advocare Invitational final.

Other topics we touched on: Whether or not Scott is ever going to apologize to Wayne Selden, Wichita State’s tournament hopes, Texas A&M and whether we’d take Ben Simmons, Kris Dunn or Denzel Valentine today.

As always, you can subscribe to the podcast in iTunes right here. It’s the quickest way to get access on your cell phone or tablet.