NCAA Men's Championship Game - Kansas v Kentucky

Changes coming to the block/charge, flagrant elbow rules

1 Comment

The NCAA has made another step in their neverending battle in trying to perfect the the block/charge rule.

On Monday, the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel voted to make a change to the rule in an attempt to bring some modicum of consistency to how the call is made.

“Under the revised block/charge call in men’s basketball, a defensive player is not permitted to move into the path of an offensive player once he has started his upward motion with the ball to attempt a field goal or pass,” the NCAA wrote in a release. “If the defensive player is not in legal guarding position by this time, it is a blocking foul.”

The 2012-2013 season was rife with complaints about how the block/charge rule was being called, but the impetus for the rule change was a charge that was drawn by Ohio State’s Aaron Craft in the final seconds of an NCAA tournament win over Iowa State.

Remember the hullaballoo this call created? That wasn’t the only time that Iowa State was robbed by a referee misunderstanding the block/charge rule, either, was it, Elijah Johnson? The rule needed to be fixed, and while the changes being made this summer are a good thing, it’s important to remember that this isn’t going to change the fact that there are referees out there that will continue to make incorrect calls. Remember how promising we thought the charge circle was going to be?

New rules don’t mean that the correct call is always going to be made.

There were a couple of other rule changes made on Monday as well:

  • The NCAA took a note out of the Jay Bilas school of basketball and decided to try and find a way to open the game up by reducing the amount of fouling and physicality that goes on. The following fouls will be points of emphasis next season:- When a defensive player keeps a hand or forearm on an opponent.- When a defensive player puts two hands on an opponent.

    – When a defensive player continually jabs by extending his arm(s) and placing a hand or forearm on the opponent.

    – When a player uses an arm bar to impede the progress of an opponent.

  • There will be an increased use of monitor reviews next season. Referees can now use the monitor to review shot clock violations and out-of-bounds calls in the final two minutes and overtime. They can also review to see which player committed a foul, not just to determine who should be the foul shooter. The NCAA will also use the rule the Big Ten tested last season, waiting to review whether a shot was a two or a three until the next TV timeout unless it is in the final four minutes or overtime.
  • The best rule change that will be made is to the elbow rule. Previously, if an elbow was swung and it hit a player above the shoulders, it was an automatic flagrant foul. Now, the referees will be allowed some discretion in determining whether or not to give out a flagrant using a monitor review.

The rule change regarding flagrant elbows is the most important here.

Changing the definition of a charge isn’t going to change how often a ref can may the call correctly. It’s not an easy thing to do. And just because the rule book now says you can’t put two hands on an opponent doesn’t mean that refs will be calling those fouls every time it happens; if they do, Louisville and VCU are going to have long seasons.

New rules won’t make referees more accurate.

But allowing refs to avoid handing out game-changing flagrants on inadvertent elbows is a huge step.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

No. 5 Xavier stumbles at Creighton, lose 70-54

Creighton's Cole Huff (13) and Toby Hegner, left, guard Xavier's Jalen Reynolds (1) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Omaha, Neb., Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
(AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Leave a comment

Mo Watson went for a career-high 32 points, seven boards and five assists as Creighton jumped out to an early 21-4 lead and never looked back, beating No. 5 Xavier, 70-54, in Omaha on Tuesday night.

 

It was a massive win for the Bluejays, who still have an outside shot at earning an at-large bid this season. (We wrote all about that here.)

As well as Creighton played, the bigger story here may actually be Xavier, who lost for just the third time this season; they had been the only top ten team with just two losses to their name.

The issue for the Musketeers tonight was two-fold, but they both are a symptom of what could be an issue down the road for this team: Xavier doesn’t really have a true point guard.

They certainly didn’t have anyone to stop Watson. By the second half, they had essentially asked Reynolds, who was playing the middle of their 1-3-1 zone to matchup with Watson. It was weird but was actually somewhat effective.

The Musketeers also started out ice cold from the floor, missing 11 of their first 13 shots, and those misses led to leak outs from Bluejays, who got layups and open threes in transition to build that 17 point lead. Once Xavier got behind, it turned into scramble mode for Xavier. They forced shots early in the clock and didn’t start pounding the ball into the paint until it was too late. What they needed was someone to be able to settle things, to ensure that offensive would get initiated and sets would get executed when they were able to get the lead down to single digits.

That 1-for-19 shooting performance from beyond the arc certainly didn’t help matters, and neither did the fact that they got just nine field goals all game from players not named James Farr or Jalen Reynolds. The most frustrating part for head coach Chris Mack? They had good shots. It wasn’t like Creighton took away everything that Xavier wanted to do.

The kids just had one of those nights where nothing went down.

Those happen.

And when you combine them with a total inability to contain the opposing team’s point guard, what you get is a 16 point loss on the road against a team that was desperate to get a good win.

Gill’s 16, ‘D’ lead No. 7 Virginia past Virginia Tech, 67-49

Lehigh Virginia Basketball
AP Photo/Andrew Shurtleff
Leave a comment

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) Anthony Gill scored 16 points and No. 7 Virginia turned the tables on state rival Virginia Tech with a 67-49 victory Tuesday night, the Cavaliers’ seventh straight.

Isaiah Wilkins added a career-best 14 points and Malcolm Brogdon had 12 for the Cavaliers (20-4, 9-3 Atlantic Coast Conference). Virginia avenged a 70-68 loss to the Hokies in Blacksburg on Jan. 4 in what rates as their worst performance of the season, and extended their winning streak at John Paul Jones Arena to 17 games.

Freshman Justin Robinson scored 16 points and classmate Chris Clarke had 11 in his first action for the Hokies (13-12, 5-7) since breaking his right foot in late December. Virginia Tech’s top two scorers, Zach LeDay (16.0 ppg) and Seth Allen (14.5), were limited to seven and six points, respectively, in part because of foul trouble.

Virginia coach Tony Bennett said his team wasn’t ready to play when it lost to the Hokies earlier, but they have been surging of late and were focused from the outset. They were credited with assists and 14 of their first 15 baskets and forced 10 turnovers in the first half; they forced just eight in the last meeting of the teams.

For most of the game, the Hokies had more turnovers than field goals.

The Cavaliers led 32-20 at halftime and extended their advantage to 47-29 on a three-point play by Mike Tobey with 12:11 remaining. It capped an 11-4 run for Virginia, during which LeDay was whistled for his fourth foul. On Virginia’s next trip down court, it got the ball to Gill inside and LeDay basically backed off and let him score, quickly earning a spot on the bench.

The Cavaliers’ lead never dipped into single digits again.

The Hokies had just eight turnovers and outscored Virginia 26-6 off turnovers in their first meeting. This time, Virginia Tech had 10 turnovers by halftime and the Cavaliers had already turned them into 15 points. Virginia Tech finished with 16 field goals and 15 turnovers.

Already leading 9-6, Virginia got scoring from eight players in a 23-8 run that spanned about 8 1/2 minutes.

Gill started it with a dunk, Brogdon hit a 3-pointer, London Perrantes had a four-point play and Wilkins finished it with two free throws, giving the Cavaliers a 32-14 lead with 2:06 left in the half. They didn’t score again, and the Hokies closed within 32-20 by halftime.

TIP-INS

Virginia Tech: The Hokies shot 57.1 percent (15 of 26) from the field in the second half of their 70-68 victory against Virginia on Jan. 4. … Virginia Tech’s starting five totaled four points in the first half.

Virginia: The Cavaliers have held four consecutive opponents to 50 points or fewer.

UP NEXT

Virginia Tech plays at No. 12 Miami next Wednesday.

Virginia plays at Duke on Saturday.

Follow Hank on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/hankkurzjr

The AP’s college basketball page: http://www.collegebasketball.ap.org