alex len

Why did Alex Len wait to get an MRI until after the season?

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Alex Len will be hearing his name called by David Stern during Thursday’s NBA Draft, potentially as the No. 1 pick, but while the rest of the prospective lottery picks have been spending their spring working out for various NBA teams, Len has been laid up on crutches.

The 7-foot-1 Ukrainian had surgery back in May on his left ankle to fix a stress fracture, meaning that his preparation for the draft has involved quite a bit of rehab.

This kind of thing happens.

Basketball players get injured, and 7-foot-1 19 year olds are anything but immune. Just look at Nerlens Noel, who is currently recovering from a torn ACL, and Anthony Bennett, who is rehabbing a shoulder injury he suffered during the season.

The injury itself shouldn’t be a huge concern.

What could be a concern, however, is how this injury was handled by Maryland’s training staff. Let’s start with the beginning of Len’s appearance on Grantland’s Job Interview Series with Bill Simmons and Jalen Rose (video embedded at the bottom). At the :30 mark:

Bill Simmons: “Were you playing with it and it didn’t feel right, or you knew right away that something was wrong?”

Alex Len: “I played like half of the season on this.”

BS: “You were playing hurt?”

AL: “Yeah, but I didn’t know. I just found out after the season.”

The conversation continued at the 9:00 mark:

Simmons: “So, like the last month of the season you were playing hurt?”

Len: “Yeah.”

BS: “And you knew it? Did you tell anybody?”

AL: “Yeah, I told my trainers, but we treated it like a regular, like, ankle sprain. We did a lot of treatment. Icing, stuff like that, steam. But we decided to do MRI after the season. After the season, we found out I had a problem in there.”

Jalen Rose: “Bill, when you’re in college they don’t want you to get [the MRI] during the season. It benefits them for you to finish the season.”

BS: “I don’t love that idea. The MRI should have happened before.”

Why didn’t the MRI happen during the year?

According to a Maryland spokesperson, Len underwent an x-ray in early March. It was looked at by team doctors and came back negative. The training staff began treatment on the injury — ice baths, stim, etc. — and Len was held out of practices, and it helped decrease his pain. Three days after the season ended, Len got an MRI and a second opinion, and that’s when the stress fracture was noticed.

Injuries are never an exact science. It’s quite possible that Len’s injury didn’t require surgery until a setback that happened after the season. And it’s important to remember that Len just turned 20 last week. He’s a competitor that wants to be out on the court; he may not have been completely honest with the training staff about how bad the injury was hurting him.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

UNLV’s Stephen Zimmerman out with a knee injury

UNLV forward Stephen Zimmerman Jr. shoots against San Diego State during an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016, in Las Vegas. (L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
(L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
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The injury Stephen Zimmerman suffered on Saturday will keep the star UNLV freshman out for at least a week, a source told NBC Sports.

The injury is not thought to be serious, however. Zimmerman may be kept out for longer as a precaution, but that’s a result of the Runnin’ Rebels being in a situation where the rest of their regular season is relatively meaningless.

They’re not getting an at-large bid to the NCAA tournament regardless of how they finish out league play. With back-up center Ben Carter out with a torn ACL, it’s more important to make sure that Zimmerman, who is averaging 10.6 points and 9.1 boards this season, is totally healthy for the Mountain West tournament.

That tournament, mind you, will be played at UNLV’s Thomas & Mack Center.

So the Runnin’ Rebels, regardless of how poor they’ve played this season, will always have a chance to land an automatic bid.

Anyway, the more interesting aspect of this story is how Zimmerman injured the knee. It was a completely avoidable play that came after the whistle, but I’m not sure it was what you would call a “dirty play”. You tell me:

VIDEO: Buddy Hield is ‘all money’ on game-winning three vs. No. 24 Texas

Oklahoma guard Buddy Hield (24) takes a shot over Oklahoma State forward Chris Oliver during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Stillwater, Okla., Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Brody Schmidt)
(AP Photo/Brody Schmidt)
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With a little more than three minutes left on Monday night, No. 24 Texas held a 57-51 lead on No. 3 Oklahoma in Norman as Jordan Woodard struggled again and Buddy Hield failed to find the rhythm that he had throughout the first three months of the season.

At that point in the game, Hield was 4-for-14 from the floor with 15 points and four turnovers. He had just missed a pair of wide-open threes

“I couldn’t make a shot,” Hield said after the game. But that changed down the stretch. First, Hield finally got a three to drop. On the next possession, he got all the way to the rim and scored. On the following two possessions, he was fouled on a drive to the rim and hit four free throws. And after missing a pull-up jumper, Hield did this:

“I told coach I wanted the ball,” Hield said, “I saw Lammert coming to bite, so I pulled up.”

“It’s all money.”

Hield is already the favorite to win National Player of the Year, and this performance is only going to help his cause further. Think about it like this: Buddy was not good on Monday night, at least according to his (admittedly lofty) standards. But he still finished with 27 points and shook off a cold shooting night just in time to take over down the stretch.

Now think about this: Hield’s head coach has enough confidence in him to hand him the keys in the final minutes despite the fact that he’s struggling and on a team that has two other players that Lon Kruger trusts on game-winning possessions. Think about it. When Oklahoma beat West Virginia at the buzzer, it was Jordan Woodard that the play was drawn up for. When they beat LSU, it was Isaiah Cousins that got the rock on the final possession while Hield was used as a decoy. .

Want to talk about coaching luxuries?

Kruger has three guards that can shoot, penetrate and score, and penetrate and kick, and one of them is the National Player of the Year that doesn’t mind being used as a decoy.