Marcus Smart

Two sources of ‘pain’ influenced Marcus Smart’s decision to return to school

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The process of deciding whether or not to return to school for another year can be a tough one, especially when the player making the decision is projected to be a high lottery pick.

That was the case for Oklahoma State point guard Marcus Smart, who many expected to be the first guard taken in next Thursday’s NBA Draft had he made the decision to leave Stillwater.

However there were two factors that ultimately led to Smart deciding to return for his sophomore season: an injury to his right wrist and the way in which the Cowboys’ season ended. In a story done by Mike DeCourcy of the Sporting News, Smart discussed the NCAA tournament loss to Oregon as well as how tough (and emotional) the decision-making process proved to be.

“It took me a long time. I actually cried about it. It’s a hard decision for an 18-year-old kid, seeing that much money thrown at him, able to turn it down,” Smart told Sporting News. “It’s unthinkable. It’s unheard of. Nobody’s ever done that: a top-five draft pick turning that much money down, guaranteed, to come back to school for another year.”

Smart is one of 12 players selected to play for the United States Under-19 Team, which begins play in the U-19 FIBA World Championships next Thursday against Ivory Coast. The hope for Smart and Oklahoma State head coach Travis Ford is that the time spent with USA Basketball will serve as a catalyst for an even better sophomore season.

Smart won Big 12 Freshman of the Year honors in 2012-13, as he posted averages of 15.4 points, 5.8 rebounds and 4.2 assists per game. Oklahoma State finished the season with a 24-9 record (13-5 Big 12), a year that included a Puerto Rico Tip-Off title and the program’s first win at Allen Fieldhouse since 1990. But it’s that 65-53 loss to Oregon that sticks with Smart.

“I just feel like I couldn’t leave them on the note we ended on, losing to Oregon in the round (of 64),” Smart said. “We weren’t playing our best ball at the time. I felt like I didn’t do enough to help my team at the time. I just feel like I left my teammates down.”

What can Smart (and his teammates) do for an encore in 2013-14? Oklahoma State is expected to contend for a Big 12 title along with Kansas (which has won or shared the last nine regular season titles) and Baylor, and the Cowboys certainly have the pieces needed to make good on the preseason expectations.

Raphielle can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

VIDEO: Duke’s Grayson Allen beats No. 7 Virginia at the buzzer

Duke's Grayson Allen (3) and Marshall Plumlee (40) react during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Louisville in Durham, N.C., Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. Duke won 72-65. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
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Notre Dame’s Steve Vasturia sparks come-from-behind win over No. 13 Louisville

Notre Dame’s Steve Vasturia (32) goes up for a shot over Boston College’s Idy Diallo (4) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in South Bend, Ind. (AP Photo/Robert Franklin)
(AP Photo/Robert Franklin)
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Demetrius Jackson scored 20 of his 25 points in the first half and Steve Vasturia scored 15 of his 20 points in the final 20 minutes as Notre Dame landed a 71-66 win over No. 13 Louisville on Saturday afternoon.

The Fighting Irish trailed by as many as 11 points early in the second half, but Vasturia’s hot shooting combined with Notre Dame holding Louisville to just 15 points in the final 15 minutes made all the difference.

The Fighting Irish are not as good as they were last season, but they are built in a similar mold. Jackson, as we expected, as become one of the nation’s most dynamic point guards, impossible to slow-down in isolation and ball-screen actions. Steve Vasturia emerging as a legitimate secondary option offensively and Zach Auguste is one of the nation’s most underrated big men and one of the most dangerous as the roll-man in ball-screens.

Combine all of that with a handful of shooters creating space and Bonzie Colson’s emergence as a force on the offensive glass, and Mike Brey once again has one of the nation’s most lethal offensive attacks.

Where they struggle is on the defensive end of the floor, which is what makes the end of Saturday’s win so meaningful. The Irish entered the day ranked 232nd in KenPom’s adjusted defensive efficiency metric, which more or less means they’re as good as a bad mid-major program at keeping their opponents from scoring.

But they don’t have to be great to be able to win games.

They have to be good enough and they have to get important stops.

That’s precisely what happened on Saturday.

Whether or not that actually becomes a trend for this group will be something to monitor — it happened for Duke during last year’s NCAA tournament — but the bottom-line is this: Notre Dame does something better than just about anyone else in college basketball, and that’s score the ball.

On the nights they are able to gets some stops, they are going to be able to win some games. In the last eight days, they’ve proven that, beating North Carolina, Clemson on the road and Louisville.

And that makes them dangerous in March.