Michigan v Syracuse

Michigan’s recruiting philosophy, and a fun Mitch McGary anecdote

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One of the best parts about my job is hearing about the little, seemingly random stories from the recruiting trail and how they led one program and one player together.

One example? Delaware head coach Monte Ross was looking for a shooter at a tournament. As he was walking past a court to a different gym, he saw a kid hit a three. By the time they reached the end of the court, the kid had hit another three. He ended up going for 40 points in the game. Delaware ended up offering him and signing him. His name was Kyle Anderson, and while he didn’t have a profile on Rivals or ESPN, he started 30 games and averaged 8.9 points as a freshman.

Another example? Jae Crowder. Buzz Williams went to see him play in a Junior College game. Crowder had three first half fouls and finished with three points and four boards. He was awful. But he also spent evert second on the bench cheering on his teammates, leading them off the bench to dole out high-fives during timeouts. He was a great teammates. And that is why Williams offered him a scholarship, which netted him a Big East Player of the Year.

Why do I bring this up?

Because Mike Rothstein of ESPN.com wrote an intriguing story on Michigan’s recruiting system on Monday. They way they do things is a bit odd. All of their assistants evaluate and recruit all of their targets. They have a scoring system that they refuse to divulge. They’d rather recruit players that aren’t ranked all that highly than the guys that every scouting service loves. They won’t offer a player a scholarship until they’ve taken an unofficial visit to the school, until head coach John Beilein has seen them play in person and until June 15th after their sophomore season.

The most interesting nugget, however, can be found here:

When [assistant coach Bacari] Alexander visits a player’s school, he searches for “indicators” about a player. To do so, he seeks out three people: the academic advisor, who can often give a broader-based picture of a player’s academics and family situation; the cafeteria worker; and the custodial staff.

More than any other people in the school, the latter two often silently observe prospects among their peers. They see a player interact when no one is watching. Alexander’s best example: Mitch McGary at Brewster Academy (N.H.).

Alexander spoke to Brewster’s groundskeeper and was told a story about a freshman bawling when his parents dropped him off the first day of school. McGary spotted the kid from a distance, stopped his conversation and ran to him, consoled him and brought him into school with his group of friends.

“Now if that is not a testament to a young man’s character,” Alexander said. “Where he’s the life of the gathering and is unselfish enough to notice somebody is in need of comfort. To do that was very telling to the groundskeeper.

“As a result, it was very telling to us.”

How about that?

McGary was a revelation during the 2013 NCAA tournament, making everyone remember why he was, at one point, a top two player in the Class of 2012.

And you have to wonder: if it wasn’t for that groundskeeper’s story, does he end up at Michigan?

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Akron reveals special bobble heads for LeBron, high school teammates

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When it comes to discussing some of the game of basketball’s best players, specifically those who went directly from high school to the NBA, a question that’s often asked is where said player would have attended college if forced (by rule) to do so. Kevin Garnett, Kobe Bryant and LeBron James are among those who have been discussed in this manner, and in the case of LeBron he’s got connections to two programs within his home state of Ohio.

LeBron’s connected with the Ohio State program, which is outfitted by the Nike’s LeBron signature line, but there’s another program with an even closer connection. That would be Akron, which is led by head coach Keith Dambrot, and all he did was serve as LeBron’s high school coach at St. Vincent/St. Mary’s HS in Akron during the player’s freshman and sophomore years at the school. Also on those teams were two future Akron Zips in guard Dru Joyce and forward Romeo Travis.

Thursday the school announced that it would be honoring James, Joyce and Travis with bobble head dolls to be given out before Akron’s home games against Buffalo (February 16; Joyce’s bobble head), Bowling Green (February 26; Travis) and Ohio (March 1; James).

All three bobble head dolls are wearing Akron uniforms, which in the case of LeBron allows fans to think back and imagine what could have been. Season ticket holders guaranteed one bobble head per account (on each of the three giveaway days), with the first 750 fans in attendance to receive one as well.

NEW PODCAST: Indiana, Cal, troublesome trends and a weekend preview

California's Jabari Bird celebrates a score against Oregon in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016, in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
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The gang is back together again for another episode of the NBCSports.com College Basketball Talk Podcast, with Rob Dauster hosting and Raphielle Johnson and Scott Phillips joining him. Today’s episode touched on big wins picked up Thursday night by California and Indiana, discussing the performances of those teams and also touching on their prospects down the line.

Also discussed were the recent performances of Iowa State, Providence and Texas A&M (which are you more worried about?), and some of the top games on this weekend’s schedule headlined by Kansas visiting Oklahoma. And if you’re a fan of seafood, you may take umbrage with some of Rob’s comments at the beginning of the podcast.

As always, you can subscribe to the podcast on either iTunes or Stitcher, and there’s also a link to listen to this podcast below. Thanks for listening.