Iowa State Cyclones head coach Hoiberg reacts to a call during their third round NCAA tournament basketball game against Ohio State Buckeyes in Dayton

Why the Letter of Intent is awful: Richard Amardi loses scholarship to Iowa State

Leave a comment

By this point, everyone should know that the NCAA’s National Letter of Intent is the worst contract to sign in all of sports.

The intention is good; the goal of the NLI is to end a player’s recruitment when he decides that he wants to go to a certain school.

But the way that it plays out is weighted entirely in favor of the school. The contract legally binds the player to the school, forcing him to enroll for at least a year unless he wants to have a year of his eligibility taken away. That’s precisely what is happening with Notre Dame signee Eddie Vanderdoes. He signed an NLI with Notre Dame, but has since decided that it would be more important for him to attend school closer to home because of an ill family member.

That doesn’t matter, however, since Notre Dame won’t grant him a release. Vanderdoes is going to be spending a year on the sidelines that will cost him a year of eligibility.

That’s not the worst part of the NLI, though.

The worst part is that the school can cut ties with a player at any time it chooses. In other words, signing an NLI in no way guarantees that the player will have a scholarship waiting for him.

Take, for example, Richard Amardi.

Amardi, a 6-foot-9 forward from Indian Hills CC, signed an NLI with Iowa State back in November. For the last nine months, he’s been locked in to be a Cyclone during the 2013-2014 season. But since Fred Hoiberg was once again active on the transfer market and landed for Marshall guard Deandre Kane late last month, there are now no scholarships available for Amardi.

He’s been released from his NLI by Iowa State.

He will not be a Cyclone unless he feels like paying his own way to go to school there.

To be frank, I don’t have a huge issue with the way that ISU head coach Fred Hoiberg handled this situation. Is it ideal? No, but the bottom line is that Amardi got cut. He has one season of eligibility left, and it makes much more sense for Hoiberg to have Kane on the roster than Amardi, considering that both players have just one year of eligibility remaining. At the end of the day, Kane is a better player than Amardi, and while it’s not the classiest way to handle the situation, Hoiberg is there to win basketball games, not to cater to the last scholarship player on his bench.

The best way for him to win basketball games is to give Amardi’s scholarship to Kane. That may hurt him recruiting down the road, but more people are going to remember a poor record next March than are going to remember Hoiberg yanking a kid’s scholarship this June.

The issue here is that the rule is structured this way in the first place.

The problem is the NLI.

It gives all the power and all the leverage to the schools.

And it’s kids like Amardi that end up getting the worst of it.

Hopefully, he can find a place to play out his final year of eligibility.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Marcus Paige, Joel Berry lead No. 9 North Carolina past No. 2 Maryland

Leave a comment

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — He’s back.

For the first time this season — and for the first time in more than a year that he hasn’t been hampered with some kind of foot or ankle injury — Marcus Paige donned a North Carolina jersey, and it didn’t take him long to find the form that made him the Preseason National Player of the Year.

On the first Tar Heel possession, Paige came off of a ball-screen, drove the lane and found Kennedy Meeks at the rim for a layup. Not 30 seconds later, he came off of a down screen and buried a three. Paige would finish with 20 points and five assists as No. 9 North Carolina put together a fairly resounding win over No. 2 Maryland in the Dean Dome on Tuesday night, winning 89-81.

Paige finished 7-for-12 from the floor and 4-for-5 from beyond the arc, hitting a number of threes in the second half that helped hold off a Maryland push sparked by their own all-american point guard, Melo Trimble.

Trimble was erratic early on, committing three turnovers in the first six minutes and eight on the night, but it was his play at the end of the first half and early second half that kept North Carolina from blowing their doors. At one point, Maryland was down 32-19 and in danger of getting run out of Tobacco Road.

In total, Trimble finished with 23 points and 12 assists, hitting four big threes during that stretch. He either scored or assisted on 11 of Maryland’s first 12 second half field goals.

As good as Paige was, the bigger story may actually be Joel Berry II. He took two dumb threes in the first half — which played a role in Maryland being able to make this a game — and he missed a few free throws late, but overall he was terrific. He finished with 14 points and five assists, making 3-of-5 threes and turning the ball over just twice. He’s clearly beat Nate Britt out at the point guard spot, and his ability to take pressure off of Paige as a secondary ball-handler and playmaker is huge.

(More to come from Chapel Hill…)

VIDEO: Melo Trimble drops Nate Britt with a crossover

Leave a comment

North Carolina is hosting No. 2 Maryland in a heated contest in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge. Terps sophomore guard Melo Trimble is playing very well and part of his performance was dropping North Carolina’s Nate Britt with a crossover in the second half.

(H/T: The Cauldron)