Duke signee Semi Ojeleye named Parade Magazine Player of the Year


For all the accolades heaped upon Kansas signee Andrew Wiggins (and deservedly so), Parade Magazine went with another player for its 2012-13 Boys’ Basketball Player of the Year.

Semi Ojeleye, a Duke signee from Ottawa, Kansas, averaged more than 38 points per game this season while also getting the job done in the classroom to the tune of a 4.0 grade-point average.

Because of those achievements, Ojeleye was named the recipient of Parade’s highest individual honor on Saturday.

This past season, Ojeleye’s high school team went 25-0 and captured its state title, while he set career and senior-year scoring records (2,763 and 952 points, respectively) for the state of Kansas. No mean feat, especially when you consider that the career mark had stood for 17 years. Along with his ability to score, he also averaged nine rebounds, two assists, and two steals a game. He also shot 38 percent from 3-point range and 82 percent from the free-throw line.

The other finalists for the honor were Wiggins, fellow Kansas signee Conner Frankamp, Arizona signee Aaron Gordon, and Oklahoma State signee Stevie Clark.

Parade also announced its All-America Team, which traditionally is a long list that includes players headed to a variety of schools. While nationally-known powers such as Duke, Kansas and Kentucky show up annually, colleges such as North Dakota State, South Dakota State and UC Irvine are also represented on the 2013 list.

The tallest member on the Parade All-America Team is UC Irvine signee Mamadou Ndiaye, who is 7-5 and has the potential to be an impact player in the Big West next season.

And if you’re keeping count as to which college has the highest number of future players on the team, that honor goes to Kentucky. The Wildcats have four players on the list: guards Aaron Harrison and Dominique Hawkins, wing James Young and forward Marcus Lee.

The full list of Parade All-Americans:

Name Pos. High School Ht. College*
A.J. Jacobson F Shanley (Fargo, N.D.) 6-6 North Dakota St.
Aaron Gordon F Archbishop Mitty (San Jose, Calif.) 6-8 Arizona
Aaron Harrison G Travis (Richmond, Texas) 6-5 Kentucky
Anders Broman G Lakeview Christian Academy (Duluth, Minn.) 6-1 South Dakota St.
Andrew Wiggins F Huntington Prep (Huntington, W.V.) 6-8 Kansas
Austin Nichols F Briarcrest Christian (Eads, Tenn.) 6-8 Memphis
Bobby Portis F Hall (Little Rock, Ark.) 6-10 Arkansas
Brannen Greene G Tift County (Tifton, Ga.) 6-7 Kansas
Bryce Alford G La Cueva (Albuquerque, N.M.) 6-3 UCLA
Chris Walker F Holmes County (Bonifay, Fla.) 6-9 Florida
Conner Frankamp G North (Wichita, Kan.) 6-1 Kansas
Cullen Neal G Eldorado (Albuquerque, N.M.) 6-4 New Mexico
Derrick Walton Jr. G Chandler Park Academy (Harper Woods, Mich.) 6-1 Michigan
De’Runnya Wilson F Wenonah (Birmingham, Ala.) 6-6 Mississippi State
Dominique Hawkins G Madison Central (Richmond, Ky.) 6-1 Kentucky
Garet Beal F Jonesport-Beals (Jonesport, Maine) 6-6 Maine
Isaiah Hicks F J.F. Webb (Oxford, N.C.) 6-8 North Carolina
Jabari Parker F Simeon (Chicago, Ill.) 6-8 Duke
James Young G Rochester (Rochester Hills, Mich.) 6-6 Kentucky
Jarell Martin F Madison Prep Academy (Baton Rouge, La.) 6-8 LSU
Jon Severe G Christ The King (Queens, N.Y.) 6-2 Fordham
Luke Fischer C Germantown (Wis.) 6-10 Indiana
Mamadou Ndiaye C Brethren Christian (Huntington Beach, Calif.) 7-5 Cal-Irvine
Marc Loving F St. John’s (Toledo, Ohio) 6-8 Ohio State
Marcus Allen G Centennial (Las Vegas, Nev.) 6-4 Stanford
Marcus Foster G Hirschi (Wichita Falls (Texas) 6-2 Kansas State
Marcus Lee F Deer Valley (Antioch, Calif.) 6-9 Kentucky
Monte Morris G Beecher (Flint, Mich.) 6-1 Iowa State
Nick King F Memphis East (Memphis, Tenn.) 6-7 Memphis
Nigel Williams-Goss G Findlay Prep (Henderson, Nev.) 6-3 Washington
Peter Jok F Valley (West Des Moines, Iowa) 6-6 Iowa
Ricky Seals-Jones F Sealy (Texas) 6-5 Texas A&M
Roschon Prince G Poly (Long Beach, Cali.) 6-5 USC
Rysheed Jordan G Vaux (Philadelphia) 6-3 St. John’s
Semi Ojeleye F Ottawa (Kan.) 6-6 Duke
Steve Vasturia G St. Joseph’s (Philadelphia, Pa.) 6-5 Notre Dame
Stevie Clark G Douglass (Oklahoma City) 5-10 Oklahoma State
Tyler Ennis G St. Benedict’s Prep (Newark, N.J.) 6-2 Syracuse
Zach LaVine G Bothell (Wash.) 6-4 UCLA
Zak Irvin G Hamilton Southeastern (Fishers, Ind.) 6-6 Michigan

Raphielle can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

Syracuse receives mixed news on sanctions appeals

Jim Boeheim
Associated Press
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Wednesday the NCAA made its ruling on two appeals of sanctions made by Syracuse University, with the news being mixed for the men’s basketball program.

On the positive side the NCAA ruled that Syracuse will be docked two scholarships per season for the next four years, as opposed to the original ruling of three. As a result Jim Boeheim’s program only has to account for the loss of eight total scholarships, meaning that they’ll have 11 to fill in each of the next four seasons as opposed to ten.

One scholarship may not seem like a big deal, but in a sport where you only get 13 (when not dealing with sanctions) getting that grant-in-aid back really helps from a recruiting standpoint.

As for the negatives, they both concern Boeheim. Not only has there yet to be a ruling on Boeheim’s appeal of his nine-game suspension that goes into effect when ACC play begins in January (that appeal is being heard separately), but the appeal to reinstate the wins that were vacated as part of the sanctions was denied. As a result Boeheim officially has 868 wins instead of 969 (not counting today’s game against Charlotte).

And with Mike Hopkins set to take over as head coach in 2018, the denial means that college basketball will have to wait quite some time before anyone threatens to join Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski in the 1,000 wins club.

While not having the wins officially reinstated does hurt, getting a scholarship back for each of the next four seasons is a bigger deal when it comes to the long-term health of the Syracuse program. Also of great importance will be the ruling regarding Boeheim’s suspension, as a suspended coach is not allowed to have any contact with his players or coaching staff while serving the penalty.

And with the original ruling due to take up half of Syracuse’s league slate, not having Boeheim (or the chance to speak with him) is a big deal when it comes to this current team.

St. John’s forward Kassoum Yakwe cleared by NCAA

Chris Mullin
AP Photo/Rick Bowmer
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St. John’s forward Kassoum Yakwe has been cleared by the NCAA to play this season and will be eligible immediately, the school announced on Wednesday.

Yakwe is a 6-foot-8 forward that reclassified and enrolled at St. John’s this fall. He attended the same high school as Kansas forward Cheick Diallo, who was also cleared by the NCAA to play today.

St. John’s played in the Maui Invitational this week, and Yakwe did not take part. His first game with the Johnnies will be on Dec. 2nd against Fordham if the program plans to play his this season.

The question that must be asked, however, is whether or not he will suit up or simply redshirt. The Johnnies are in the midst of a serious rebuild and will be without their other elite recruit this season, Marcus Lovett. Lovett was ruled a partial qualifier. Would it make sense to burn a year of eligibility on what make amount to a wasted season, or will head coach Chris Mullin opt to save that year for down the road?