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Duke signee Semi Ojeleye named Parade Magazine Player of the Year

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For all the accolades heaped upon Kansas signee Andrew Wiggins (and deservedly so), Parade Magazine went with another player for its 2012-13 Boys’ Basketball Player of the Year.

Semi Ojeleye, a Duke signee from Ottawa, Kansas, averaged more than 38 points per game this season while also getting the job done in the classroom to the tune of a 4.0 grade-point average.

Because of those achievements, Ojeleye was named the recipient of Parade’s highest individual honor on Saturday.

This past season, Ojeleye’s high school team went 25-0 and captured its state title, while he set career and senior-year scoring records (2,763 and 952 points, respectively) for the state of Kansas. No mean feat, especially when you consider that the career mark had stood for 17 years. Along with his ability to score, he also averaged nine rebounds, two assists, and two steals a game. He also shot 38 percent from 3-point range and 82 percent from the free-throw line.

The other finalists for the honor were Wiggins, fellow Kansas signee Conner Frankamp, Arizona signee Aaron Gordon, and Oklahoma State signee Stevie Clark.

Parade also announced its All-America Team, which traditionally is a long list that includes players headed to a variety of schools. While nationally-known powers such as Duke, Kansas and Kentucky show up annually, colleges such as North Dakota State, South Dakota State and UC Irvine are also represented on the 2013 list.

The tallest member on the Parade All-America Team is UC Irvine signee Mamadou Ndiaye, who is 7-5 and has the potential to be an impact player in the Big West next season.

And if you’re keeping count as to which college has the highest number of future players on the team, that honor goes to Kentucky. The Wildcats have four players on the list: guards Aaron Harrison and Dominique Hawkins, wing James Young and forward Marcus Lee.

The full list of Parade All-Americans:

Name Pos. High School Ht. College*
A.J. Jacobson F Shanley (Fargo, N.D.) 6-6 North Dakota St.
Aaron Gordon F Archbishop Mitty (San Jose, Calif.) 6-8 Arizona
Aaron Harrison G Travis (Richmond, Texas) 6-5 Kentucky
Anders Broman G Lakeview Christian Academy (Duluth, Minn.) 6-1 South Dakota St.
Andrew Wiggins F Huntington Prep (Huntington, W.V.) 6-8 Kansas
Austin Nichols F Briarcrest Christian (Eads, Tenn.) 6-8 Memphis
Bobby Portis F Hall (Little Rock, Ark.) 6-10 Arkansas
Brannen Greene G Tift County (Tifton, Ga.) 6-7 Kansas
Bryce Alford G La Cueva (Albuquerque, N.M.) 6-3 UCLA
Chris Walker F Holmes County (Bonifay, Fla.) 6-9 Florida
Conner Frankamp G North (Wichita, Kan.) 6-1 Kansas
Cullen Neal G Eldorado (Albuquerque, N.M.) 6-4 New Mexico
Derrick Walton Jr. G Chandler Park Academy (Harper Woods, Mich.) 6-1 Michigan
De’Runnya Wilson F Wenonah (Birmingham, Ala.) 6-6 Mississippi State
Dominique Hawkins G Madison Central (Richmond, Ky.) 6-1 Kentucky
Garet Beal F Jonesport-Beals (Jonesport, Maine) 6-6 Maine
Isaiah Hicks F J.F. Webb (Oxford, N.C.) 6-8 North Carolina
Jabari Parker F Simeon (Chicago, Ill.) 6-8 Duke
James Young G Rochester (Rochester Hills, Mich.) 6-6 Kentucky
Jarell Martin F Madison Prep Academy (Baton Rouge, La.) 6-8 LSU
Jon Severe G Christ The King (Queens, N.Y.) 6-2 Fordham
Luke Fischer C Germantown (Wis.) 6-10 Indiana
Mamadou Ndiaye C Brethren Christian (Huntington Beach, Calif.) 7-5 Cal-Irvine
Marc Loving F St. John’s (Toledo, Ohio) 6-8 Ohio State
Marcus Allen G Centennial (Las Vegas, Nev.) 6-4 Stanford
Marcus Foster G Hirschi (Wichita Falls (Texas) 6-2 Kansas State
Marcus Lee F Deer Valley (Antioch, Calif.) 6-9 Kentucky
Monte Morris G Beecher (Flint, Mich.) 6-1 Iowa State
Nick King F Memphis East (Memphis, Tenn.) 6-7 Memphis
Nigel Williams-Goss G Findlay Prep (Henderson, Nev.) 6-3 Washington
Peter Jok F Valley (West Des Moines, Iowa) 6-6 Iowa
Ricky Seals-Jones F Sealy (Texas) 6-5 Texas A&M
Roschon Prince G Poly (Long Beach, Cali.) 6-5 USC
Rysheed Jordan G Vaux (Philadelphia) 6-3 St. John’s
Semi Ojeleye F Ottawa (Kan.) 6-6 Duke
Steve Vasturia G St. Joseph’s (Philadelphia, Pa.) 6-5 Notre Dame
Stevie Clark G Douglass (Oklahoma City) 5-10 Oklahoma State
Tyler Ennis G St. Benedict’s Prep (Newark, N.J.) 6-2 Syracuse
Zach LaVine G Bothell (Wash.) 6-4 UCLA
Zak Irvin G Hamilton Southeastern (Fishers, Ind.) 6-6 Michigan

Raphielle can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

UNLV’s Stephen Zimmerman out with a knee injury

UNLV forward Stephen Zimmerman Jr. shoots against San Diego State during an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016, in Las Vegas. (L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
(L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
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The injury Stephen Zimmerman suffered on Saturday will keep the star UNLV freshman out for at least a week, a source told NBC Sports.

The injury is not thought to be serious, however. Zimmerman may be kept out for longer as a precaution, but that’s a result of the Runnin’ Rebels being in a situation where the rest of their regular season is relatively meaningless.

They’re not getting an at-large bid to the NCAA tournament regardless of how they finish out league play. With back-up center Ben Carter out with a torn ACL, it’s more important to make sure that Zimmerman, who is averaging 10.6 points and 9.1 boards this season, is totally healthy for the Mountain West tournament.

That tournament, mind you, will be played at UNLV’s Thomas & Mack Center.

So the Runnin’ Rebels, regardless of how poor they’ve played this season, will always have a chance to land an automatic bid.

Anyway, the more interesting aspect of this story is how Zimmerman injured the knee. It was a completely avoidable play that came after the whistle, but I’m not sure it was what you would call a “dirty play”. You tell me:

VIDEO: Buddy Hield is ‘all money’ on game-winning three vs. No. 24 Texas

Oklahoma guard Buddy Hield (24) takes a shot over Oklahoma State forward Chris Oliver during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Stillwater, Okla., Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Brody Schmidt)
(AP Photo/Brody Schmidt)
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With a little more than three minutes left on Monday night, No. 24 Texas held a 57-51 lead on No. 3 Oklahoma in Norman as Jordan Woodard struggled again and Buddy Hield failed to find the rhythm that he had throughout the first three months of the season.

At that point in the game, Hield was 4-for-14 from the floor with 15 points and four turnovers. He had just missed a pair of wide-open threes

“I couldn’t make a shot,” Hield said after the game. But that changed down the stretch. First, Hield finally got a three to drop. On the next possession, he got all the way to the rim and scored. On the following two possessions, he was fouled on a drive to the rim and hit four free throws. And after missing a pull-up jumper, Hield did this:

“I told coach I wanted the ball,” Hield said, “I saw Lammert coming to bite, so I pulled up.”

“It’s all money.”

Hield is already the favorite to win National Player of the Year, and this performance is only going to help his cause further. Think about it like this: Buddy was not good on Monday night, at least according to his (admittedly lofty) standards. But he still finished with 27 points and shook off a cold shooting night just in time to take over down the stretch.

Now think about this: Hield’s head coach has enough confidence in him to hand him the keys in the final minutes despite the fact that he’s struggling and on a team that has two other players that Lon Kruger trusts on game-winning possessions. Think about it. When Oklahoma beat West Virginia at the buzzer, it was Jordan Woodard that the play was drawn up for. When they beat LSU, it was Isaiah Cousins that got the rock on the final possession while Hield was used as a decoy. .

Want to talk about coaching luxuries?

Kruger has three guards that can shoot, penetrate and score, and penetrate and kick, and one of them is the National Player of the Year that doesn’t mind being used as a decoy.