Eddie Jordan, Robert Barchi

Degree issue regarding Rutgers head coach Eddie Jordan addressed

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Given the events that resulted in the Rutgers basketball program undergoing a major overhaul, of course there would be complications in regards to the hiring of Eddie Jordan as the new head coach.

The complication, according to a report from John Koblin of Deadspin: Jordan never graduated from Rutgers.

About that due diligence: Despite all the accolades he’s received from the university and despite the school’s many claims to the contrary, Jordan hasn’t actually finished his degree, according to the Rutgers registrar’s office. The office sent me a verification document, found below, that indicates that Jordan attended classes at Rutgers from 1973 to 1977. He went on to take more classes in 1978, 1981, and 1985. There was no degree listed in the document. I called up the registrar’s office on Thursday and asked for clarification.

“He did not receive a degree from us,” an official there told [Koblin].

This revelation comes after much was made about the return of a “native son” to Rutgers, a school that hasn’t reached the NCAA tournament since 1991. And even before the scandal that led to the firing of Mike Rice, Rutgers had a long way to go in its quest to be competitive upon entering the Big Ten in 2014.

In a report from ESPN New York, Jordan stated that in 1985 he completed the work needed to finish his studies but did not receive a diploma due to a registration issue. Did Jordan claim on his résumé to have graduated from Rutgers? Regardless of the answer to that question, how difficult is it for the school to check the claims on his résumé?

Many wondered if the lack of a bachelor’s degree could lead to Jordan losing his job, and the school answered that question in a statement issued Friday evening. Rutgers does not require a head coach to have a bachelor’s degree; the NCAA allows each individual school to set the requirements for its coaching positions.

While Rutgers was in error when it reported that Eddie Jordan had earned a degree from Rutgers University, neither Rutgers nor the NCAA requires a head coach to hold a baccalaureate degree.  Eddie Jordan was a four-year letterman and was inducted into the Rutgers Athletics Hall of Fame in 1980.  Rutgerssought Eddie for the head coach position as a target-of-opportunity hire based on his remarkable public career.

Jordan isn’t the first major college coach to be in such a position (before finding out having the degree wasn’t a requirement for the job), as both Sidney Lowe (then at NC State) and Clyde Drexler (Houston) had to finish up their undergraduate studies before accepting head coaching positions.

So as far as the school is concerned there’s no issue with Jordan not having his degree. But this entire situation could have been avoided if handled in a straightforward manner from the start. Just like the original viewing of the infamous practice tapes.

Raphielle can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

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Notre Dame’s Steve Vasturia sparks come-from-behind win over No. 13 Louisville

Notre Dame’s Steve Vasturia (32) goes up for a shot over Boston College’s Idy Diallo (4) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in South Bend, Ind. (AP Photo/Robert Franklin)
(AP Photo/Robert Franklin)
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Demetrius Jackson scored 20 of his 25 points in the first half and Steve Vasturia scored 15 of his 20 points in the final 20 minutes as Notre Dame landed a 71-66 win over No. 13 Louisville on Saturday afternoon.

The Fighting Irish trailed by as many as 11 points early in the second half, but Vasturia’s hot shooting combined with Notre Dame holding Louisville to just 15 points in the final 15 minutes made all the difference.

The Fighting Irish are not as good as they were last season, but they are built in a similar mold. Jackson, as we expected, as become one of the nation’s most dynamic point guards, impossible to slow-down in isolation and ball-screen actions. Steve Vasturia emerging as a legitimate secondary option offensively and Zach Auguste is one of the nation’s most underrated big men and one of the most dangerous as the roll-man in ball-screens.

Combine all of that with a handful of shooters creating space and Bonzie Colson’s emergence as a force on the offensive glass, and Mike Brey once again has one of the nation’s most lethal offensive attacks.

Where they struggle is on the defensive end of the floor, which is what makes the end of Saturday’s win so meaningful. The Irish entered the day ranked 232nd in KenPom’s adjusted defensive efficiency metric, which more or less means they’re as good as a bad mid-major program at keeping their opponents from scoring.

But they don’t have to be great to be able to win games.

They have to be good enough and they have to get important stops.

That’s precisely what happened on Saturday.

Whether or not that actually becomes a trend for this group will be something to monitor — it happened for Duke during last year’s NCAA tournament — but the bottom-line is this: Notre Dame does something better than just about anyone else in college basketball, and that’s score the ball.

On the nights they are able to gets some stops, they are going to be able to win some games. In the last eight days, they’ve proven that, beating North Carolina, Clemson on the road and Louisville.

And that makes them dangerous in March.