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Ten-second count may finally be coming to women’s college basketball

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Much of the attention being paid to the rules changes recommended for college basketball has been focused on the recommendations made by the men’s basketball rules committee.

But the women’s basketball rules committee also met Thursday, and among their recommendations is a rule that would have a major impact on the women’s game. The recommendation: adding the ten-second backcourt rule.

There’s been no such rule in women’s basketball since the NCAA began sponsoring a championship in the sport in the 1981-82 season (before that it was the AIAW that did so), with teams having the full 30-second shot clock to get the ball over half court if needed.

There was a five-second closely guarded rule for players in the backcourt due to the absence of a ten-count, and that rule would be eliminated should the Playing Rules Oversight Panel approve the proposed changes on June 18.

“Given feedback from stakeholders through the years, this is the right time to approve the rule,” said Barbara Burke, Women’s Basketball Rules Committee chair and director of athletics at Eastern Illinois. “Overall, we discussed pace of play, creating scoring opportunities and flow of the game.

“Adding the 10-second backcourt rule adds another element of strategy, and this rule fits into the concepts of growing the game.”

Frankly it’s beyond time that the women’s game added the ten-second backcourt rule, and it’s an issue that is more important (and influential) than the argument as to whether or not baskets should be lowered.

If approved the addition of the ten-second rule would (in theory) help increase the pace of the game, something that lowering the rims wouldn’t necessarily do.

In addition to the backcourt rule, the women’s committee has recommended that a secondary defender be allowed to draw a charge within the restricted area in situations where the offensive player begins her move inside of the lower defensive box area.

There could also be a change in the way media timeouts are handled, as a team timeout taken within 30 seconds of a scheduled media timeout (with the exception of the under-16 second half media stoppage) would become that media timeout. The goal of that change would be to avoid multiple timeouts within a short timespan, thus improving the flow of the game.

Raphielle can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

Louisville’s Rick Pitino on allegations: ‘We will get through this’

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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) Louisville coach Rick Pitino remains defiant that his program will survive the allegations in a book by an escort alleging that former Cardinals staffer Andre McGee hired her and other dancers to strip and have sex with recruits and players.

Pitino said Tuesday that the Cardinals “will get through this the right way.”

The coach told a packed room at a tipoff luncheon that he understands the motivation behind Katina Powell’s book “Breaking Cardinal Rules: Basketball and the Escort Queen,” but questions the need for the alleged activities given the talent his program has produced.

Pitino added, “We will find out the truth, whatever it may be, and those responsible will pay the price.”

Georgia Tech lands Class of 2016 guard

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Georgia Tech picked up its third Class of 2016 commitment on Tuesday as the Yellow Jackets landed a pledged from three-star guard Josh Okogie.

The 6-foot-4 guard is considered the No. 143 overall prospect in the national Class of 2016 rankings and Okogie played with a very talented Team CP3 in the Nike EYBL. In 22 games this spring and summer, Okogie averaged 10.6 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.6 steals per game while shooting 45 percent from the field.

Okogie joins three-star wing Christian Matthews and four-star big man Romello White in head coach Brian Gregory’s Class of 2016 at Georgia Tech. The group is definitely a solid influx of talent with some coming from successful grassroots programs.