Michigan v Kansas

Untangling the allegations levied by Ben McLemore’s AAU coach


Here’s what we know about the allegations surrounding Ben McLemore’s AAU coach Darius Cobb: he accepted $10,000 and a couple of trips to LA from a runner named Rodney Blackstock to try and persuade McLemore in a specific direction when deciding on his agent and his financial advisor. We also know that a cousin of McLemore, named Richard Boyd, was a long for the ride on those trips to LA. Cobb also alleges that Blackstock paid for a birthday party at a bowling alley for McLemore back in February and says the he helped out the family paying their bills from time-to-time.

That much we can pretty much state as fact if we assume that what was written in Eric Prisbell’s story from USA Today on Saturday night.

What we don’t know, however, far outweighs what we do know. How much did Kansas or Bill Self know about this deal? How much did McLemore, or his mother Sonya Reid, know about Cobb’s association with Blackstock? Did that money ever make it into McLemore’s hands, or was this simply a coach — who admitted to being an aspiring agent and who has spent two years in prison — trying to use his association with the potential No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft to better himself?

Because until there is proof that Cobb was working at the behest of McLemore and his family, he’s just another hanger-on looking to cash in on a payday for having a potentially-exploitable relationship with a soon-to-be profitable athlete.

That kind of deal happens all the time, and it makes me wonder about Cobb’s motivation here. Why is he talking to USA Today? What happened that made him go public with this? Without Cobb talking on the record and working with Prisbell in exposing this story, there wouldn’t be all that much to it. What happened that made him decide to come forward? Was he cut out of the deal and this is his way of getting back at the player and the family? Or was this a calculated move, a premeditated effort for the people in the McLemore camp to preemptively strike down a story that they had heard was in the pipeline?

If Cobb was the conduit on a cash pipeline from Blackstock to the McLemore’s, it looks a lot better for Ben and the Kansas program if it’s some renegade AAU coach trying to get his while he still is able to leech off of his former player.

Because if that’s the case, than the NCAA won’t have much of a case to speak of.

It would be hard to penalize Kansas for using an ineligible player when neither the school nor the player was aware that when Cobb began peddling his influence, McLemore technically became in eligible. And McLemore is much more marketable when he’s not the reason that Kansas had a full-season of games wiped out of the NCAA’s history books.

That may not be true, not when Blackstock is paying for birthday parties and the money that he is giving Cobb is eventually paying for McLemore’s bills.

But that’s also not the most important argument here. Does it really matter? None of this influenced McLemore’s decision to enroll at Kansas. And none of it played a roll in his decision to head to the NBA; he was all-but out the door since the first time he went for 25 points in a game.

The only effect that the $10,000 that found itself in Cobb’s back account will have on the Jayhawk program is that, by retroactively making McLemore ineligible, it could become the only thing to keep Kansas from winning at least a share of the Big 12 regular season title in almost a decade.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Tom Izzo’s point is valid, but he’s wrong about the new fouling rules

Eron Harris, Tom Izzo
AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
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On Sunday night, after No. 3 Michigan State knocked off No. 23 Providence in the final of the Wooden Legacy, Spartans head coach Tom Izzo made sure to make his feelings known about the new college basketball officiating mandates.

He doesn’t like them.

At all.

“I just think we’re taking the flow of the game away,” Izzo said. “Maybe it’ll change. We’ll play by the same rules everybody else does. But I think I can voice my opinion to say that I don’t agree with it.”

Part of what frustrated Izzo was that, in a matchup between the two best players in college basketball, both Denzel Valentine and Kris Dunn were sent to the bench with foul trouble.

“I didn’t like it either way,” Izzo said. “I didn’t like having Denzel on the bench, and I didn’t even like watching Dunn on the bench.”

“Don’t tweet this now and leave out the officials,” he added, according to CBSSports.com. “It’s not their fault. Because that’s the way they’re mandated to call them. So I am really either blaming the rules committee, which ends up on the coaches somewhat. So I’m looking in the mirror and blaming myself because I should have argued it more maybe. I just don’t think it’s fun to have these guys sitting.”

This is nothing new for Izzo. This was calculated. He basically said the same thing after Michigan State, then No. 1 in the country, beat Oklahoma in the Coaches vs. Cancer Classic two seasons ago, when the rules committee tried to implement these same rules. It was his pushback that started the campaign to get rid of the freedom of movement rules.

But here’s the thing: we all knew this was going to happen. We knew there was going to be an adjustment period, for coaches and players and referees alike. In the long run, freedom of movement is good for basketball. It’s part of the reason the NBA is so much fun to watch these days, as their emphasis on the freedom of movement got us out of the days where the Detroit Pistons were¬†winning titles without scoring 80 points.

Physicality is ingrained in college basketball. Coaches teach defense a certain way. Players play defense a certain way. The guys in the NBA are stronger, but the style of play is much more physical in the college game than the pro game. That doesn’t change overnight.

It changes when those rules are enforced and those fouls are called, and, as a result, the players and coaches learn to adjust to them.

Kennesaw State blows eight-point lead in 16 seconds, loses to Elon

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Kennesaw State entered Monday night at 1-6 on the season, but with 19 seconds left, it looked like the Owls have their second of the season locked up. Kendrick Ray made a pair of free throws with 19 seconds left to put KSU up 89-81, and all they had to do was avoid a complete meltdown to get out with a win.

They couldn’t.

A Luke Eddy layup with 16 seconds left cut the lead to six, and after KSU’s Nigel Pruitt missed two free throws, Dainan Swoope his a three with seven seconds left to make the score 89-86.

On the ensuing inbounds, Kennesaw State threw the ball away … and then proceeded to foul Eddy when he was shooting a three. This is what that disaster looked like:

Eddy would hit all three threes before, shockingly, KSU turned the ball over again. Elon could not capitalize this time, sending the game to overtime, where the Phoenix outscored the Owls 14-4.

Elon won 104-94.

Here’s what the comeback looked like on the play-by-play:

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