Marcus Smart, Steven Pledger, Romero Osby Way-Too-Early Preseason All-American team

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  • Marcus Smart, Oklahoma State: Smart was the nation’s best freshman in 2012-2013, and made the decision to return to school for his sophomore year despite being a projected top five pick. He’s big, he’s strong and he’s got all the intangibles that make sportswriters spew the typical cliches: he’s a winner, he’s smart, he’s a leader. A 6-foot-4, physical point guard, Smart is a consistent jumper away from being the total package.
  • Russ Smith, Louisville: Smith is the prototype for back court players in Rick Pitino’s uptempo system. He’s a terror on the defensive end of the floor and is as aggressive as anyone in the country when getting out in transition. He made the jump from sideshow to superstar as a junior because of improved shot selection, and don’t be surprised to see his game continue to mature as a senior.
  • Andrew Wiggins, TBD: Simply put, Wiggins is arguably the best prospect that we’ve seen come through the high school ranks since LeBron James. He’s a skilled, 6-foot-7 wing that can score in any number of ways and is athletic enough to get his head to the rim. It doesn’t matter if he plays for Kentucky, Florida State or Grambling, he’ll likely end up being the Preseason National Player of the Year.
  • Doug McDermott, Creighton: McDermott is a two-time first-team all-american, and he’s heading into a senior season where he’ll be asked to carry the Bluejays into a new conference. With a couple of key pieces from last year’s team graduating, McDermott — who has a chance to score his 3,000th point next season — will need to carry an even bigger load next season.
  • Adreian Payne, Michigan State: The Spartans are going to be a national title contender next season, and Payne is going to be the difference-maker. As the only significant front court presence for the Spartans, there is going to be a lot of pressure on Payne’s shoulders to produce. He’s one of the most talented front court players in the country, but he’s battled with bouts of inconsistency. But with his size, athleticism and three-point shooting ability, if Payne puts it all together, he should have a huge year.


  • Shabazz Napier, UConn
  • Aaron Craft, Ohio State
  • Gary Harris, Michigan State
  • Jabari Parker, Duke
  • Mitch McGary, Michigan


  • Jahii Carson, Arizona State
  • Semaj Christon, Xavier
  • P.J. Hairston, North Carolina
  • Julius Randle, Kentucky
  • C.J. Fair, Syracuse


Jordan Adams (UCLA), Kyle Anderson (UCLA), Isaiah Austin (Baylor), Chane Behanan (Louisville), Willie Cauley-Stein (Kentucky), Spencer Dinwiddie (Colorado), Aaron Gordon (Arizona), Montrezl Harrell (Louisville), Joe Harris (Virginia), Aaron Harrison (Kentucky), Andrew Harrison (Kentucky), Cory Jefferson (Baylor), James Michael McAdoo (North Carolina), Jordan McRae (Tennessee), Kevin Pangos (Gonzaga), Rasheed Sulaimon (Duke), Patric Young (Florida)

Syracuse receives mixed news on sanctions appeals

Jim Boeheim
Associated Press
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Wednesday the NCAA made its ruling on two¬†appeals of sanctions made by Syracuse University, with the news being mixed for the men’s basketball program.

On the positive side the NCAA ruled that Syracuse will be docked two scholarships per season for the next four years, as opposed to the original ruling of three. As a result Jim Boeheim’s program only has to account for the loss of eight total scholarships, meaning that they’ll have 11 to fill in each of the next four seasons as opposed to ten.

One scholarship may not seem like a big deal, but in a sport where you only get 13 (when not dealing with sanctions) getting that grant-in-aid back really helps from a recruiting standpoint.

As for the negatives, they both concern Boeheim. Not only has there yet to be a ruling on Boeheim’s appeal of his nine-game suspension that goes into effect when ACC play begins in January (that appeal is being heard separately), but the appeal to reinstate the wins that were vacated as part of the sanctions was denied. As a result Boeheim officially has 868 wins instead of 969 (not counting today’s game against Charlotte).

And with Mike Hopkins set to take over as head coach in 2018, the denial means that college basketball will have to wait quite some time before anyone threatens to join Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski in the 1,000 wins club.

While not having the wins officially reinstated does hurt, getting a scholarship back for each of the next four seasons is a bigger deal when it comes to the long-term health of the Syracuse program. Also of great importance will be the ruling regarding Boeheim’s suspension, as a suspended coach is not allowed to have any contact with his players or coaching staff while serving the penalty.

And with the original ruling due to take up half of Syracuse’s league slate, not having Boeheim (or the chance to speak with him) is a big deal when it comes to this current team.

St. John’s forward Kassoum Yakwe cleared by NCAA

Chris Mullin
AP Photo/Rick Bowmer
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St. John’s forward Kassoum Yakwe has been cleared by the NCAA to play this season and will be eligible immediately, the school announced on Wednesday.

Yakwe is a 6-foot-8 forward that reclassified and enrolled at St. John’s this fall. He attended the same high school as Kansas forward Cheick Diallo, who was also cleared by the NCAA to play today.

St. John’s played in the Maui Invitational this week, and Yakwe did not take part. His first game with the Johnnies will be on Dec. 2nd against Fordham if the program plans to play his this season.

The question that must be asked, however, is whether or not he will suit up or simply redshirt. The Johnnies are in the midst of a serious rebuild and will be without their other elite recruit this season, Marcus Lovett. Lovett was ruled a partial qualifier. Would it make sense to burn a year of eligibility on what make amount to a wasted season, or will head coach Chris Mullin opt to save that year for down the road?