If reports are true, good for Marcus Smart for returning to school

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In the most surprising NBA Draft decision this spring, Oklahoma State point guard Marcus Smart will announce that he is returning to school in a press conference on Wednesday afternoon, according to Yahoo! Sports.

Smart was considered a lock for the lottery. Most NBA front office types looked at him as a lock for the top five. Draft Express has Smart going third in the draft. And he’ll be returning to school. This is, indeed, a shocker.

If true, it’s also sensational news for Oklahoma State fans. All of a sudden, the Cowboys, with Le’Bryan Nash and Markel Brown back in the fold as well, look like the preseason favorite to win the Big 12.

(CLICK HERE to follow along with who is turning pro and who is returning to school.)

You also won’t find me complaining. Smart is a terrific talent on both ends of the floor. He does all the things that make media-types cough up cliches like ‘plays the game the right way’ and ‘leader on the floor’ and ‘winner’. He is all of those things, and he’s also got enough potential to be deserving of that top five pick.

The best part? He’s a better kid off the floor than he is a player on it.

So no, I have no problem watching and covering Smart at the college level for one more season.

But that doesn’t mean that I understand the decision to pass up guaranteed millions to return to school. Look what happened with guys like Cody Zeller, James Michael McAdoo and Perry Jones III. They returned to school and had their games get picked apart by the critics. Perhaps the best example in regards to Smart is Jared Sullinger. Like Smart, Sullinger excelled because of his understanding of the game and excellence in the technical aspects of the sport, not simply because he’s got endless length, athleticism and potential.

Smart is a stocky-but-strong 6-foot-4 point guard that can’t really shoot. Does he have a position at the next level? Is he athletic enough to defend NBA guards? Does he have the kind of ball-handling ability to be a full-time point guard? These are questions that will be dissected over and over again for at least the next 14 months, when the 2014 NBA Draft takes place. That, alone, could end up dropping Smart down draft boards if he doesn’t show improvement in some of his weaker areas next season.

And that’s also before you factor in that the high school class of 2013 is producing a ton of talented NBA prospects. I find it incredibly unlikely that Smart would go top five next year, even if he does have a sensational sophomore season. That’s what happens when you’re looking at a draft class that includes Andrew Wiggins, Julius Randle, Aaron Gordon and the Harrison twins.

Nerlens Noel is probably going No. 1 this year, but if Smart had gone No. 2 in this year’s draft, he would have made $8.1 million guaranteed in his first two years, with team options for $4.3 million in his third season and $5.5 million in his fourth season.

Look at the 2013-2014 rookie wage scale. The No. 6 pick makes $5.4 million in his first two seasons combined. The No. 10 pick makes $4.0 million.

So from a business and financial perspective, Smart probably isn’t making a smart decision. He could end up costing himself upwards of $10 million by staying in school. That’s an incredible amount of money, enough to keep many generations of Smarts housed and clothed and fed.

But life isn’t always about business and money and finances, and that’s the key thing to remember here. Marcus Smart’s life is about Marcus Smart pursuing what he loves and doing what makes him happy.

If Smart wants to spend another year as a college kid, if he wants to try to end Kansas’ nine-season streak of Big 12 titles and he wants to see if he can bring a Final Four banner to Gallagher-Iba Arena, than good for him. If he doesn’t think he’s ready, both from a maturity and/or a basketball perspective, to handle the rigors and the temptation of the NBA lifestyle, than good for him. A 15 year NBA career will be more lucrative than flaming out after that first contract.

So I’m happy for Smart and the decision that he has reportedly made.

It’s refreshing.

I’m glad that he’s following his heart instead of a dollar sign. I truly am.

And I’m glad that I’ll be able to watch him enjoy the decision that he made for another year.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Vance Jackson transfers to New Mexico

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With more than a handful of departures this offseason, New Mexico is set to have a new-look roster for the 2017-18 season. On Monday, Paul Weir, now at the helm of the program, landed a player who should make an impact in the three remaining seasons of eligibility he has left.

Vance Jackson, who spent this past season at UConn, decided to make the move from Storrs to Albuquerque, picking the Lobos over Rutgers, San Diego State, TCU, and Washington.

The 6-foot-8 rising sophomore will have to sit out next year due to NCAA transfer rules before resuming his collegiate career in the fall of 2018.

“The coaches — they trust in me,” Jackson told Geoff Grammer of the Albuquerque Journal last month during his official campus visit. “We’re on the same page. They see a vision.”

Weir, who led New Mexico State this past season to a NCAA Tournament appearance in his one and only season as head coach, succeeded Craig Neal in April.

This offseason has been headlined by transfers, though, those mostly were about players leaving the program. Jackson is the second transfer to land at UNM with Akron’s Antino Jackson electing to use his final season of eligibility with the Lobos. Antino Jackson is a graduate transfer, allowing him to play immediately next season.

Vance Jackson, who was rated as the No. 80 overall player in the Class of 2016 by Rivals, averaged 8.1 points, 3.8 rebounds, and 1.4 assists per game while shooting just under 40 percent from three for the Huskies as a freshman.

Adam Silver on lowering NBA Draft age minimum: ‘It’s on the table’

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NBA commissioner Adam Silver joined Dan Patrick this morning and was again questioned about the potential of the NBA changing the age limit to declare for the draft.

“If you’d asked me that a year ago, I would have said ‘if I didn’t have to negotiate this with the union, I would have raised the age minimum to 20 from 19,'” Silver told Patrick. When pressed on it, Silver said, “It’s a possible option. It’s on the table,” adding that it will be discussed by the union and in an owner’s meeting, and that he still doesn’t know what he thinks the best answer is.

But the big news is that he’s actively considering a change.

I wrote a long piece about the one-and-done rule and why the topic of what’s best for the kids is incredibly complicated. Owners don’t want to pay teenagers millions of dollars to develop; they’d rather let them develop in college and have an extra season or two on the back-end, when the player is in his prime. The players don’t want to spend a year in college, but the marketing and branding opportunities for them — not to mention to booster money that is floating around on a college campus — makes going to college a better option that going to the G-League, and that’s to say nothing of the fancy dorms, private flights and perks of being a celebrity on a college campus.

The truth is probably this: The NBA is trying to take control of basketball’s feeder systems. And I’m not just talking about making the G-League a better option than the collegiate ranks.

“It’s no longer an issue of 19 to 18 or 19 to 20,” Silver said. “I think it means that we as the NBA need to do something that we’ve avoided, which is getting more involved in youth basketball. If you sit with the folks from Nike or Under Armour or Adidas, they can tell you who the top 100 14 year olds are in the world, and there’s a fairly close correlation between the top 100 at 14 and the top 100 at 18.”

“Then I look at some of the players coming in internationally who are becoming full time professional basketball players, as we see in soccer, at 16 years old,” he added. “And they’re on a better development program and a more holistic one, in terms of injury prevention and monitoring in terms of control over them.”

This is a really nuanced decision, and again, if it interests you, I would encourage you to read what I wrote last week before listening to the hot take mafia work this story line over.

Because the fact of the matter is that there is a lot more to consider here than simply whether or not high school seniors should be allowed to go directly to the NBA.

Washington lands four-star forward Hameir Wright

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Washington and new head coach Mike Hopkins snagged another talented piece on Saturday as four-star forward Hameir Wright committed to the Huskies.

The reigning New York State Gatorade Player of the Year, Wright had was originally supposed to be a member of the Class of 2018, but he will skip his scheduled season at Brewster Academy to join Washington for the 2017-18 season.

The 6-foot-7 Wright was being pursued by a solid list of high-major programs this summer as Washington was able to land another talented player from upstate New York for next season. Wright joins wing Naz Carter, the nephew of Jay Z, as recent commits who can come in and play next season for the Huskies.

Hopkins has used his former connections as a Syracuse assistant to get his roster two immediate pieces that could be four-year players. It’s a really positive start for the first-year head coach as he has a lot of holes to fill on the Washington roster.

VIDEO: Luke Maye continues hitting big shots this summer for North Carolina

(Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
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Luke Maye became a local hero during North Carolina’s 2017 NCAA tournament run after making the game-winning jumper to get past Kentucky in the Elite Eight.

Maye has received standing ovations in class, he’s been recognized at baseball games and he’s become a celebrity since returning to Chapel Hill.

The legend of Maye will continue to grow after the junior forward knocked down another game-winning jumper against former North Carolina players during the summer Roy Williams Basketball Camp.

With a sizable camp crowd watching, Maye knocked down a top-of-the-key three last week to get the win. Theo Pinson knows the shot is good right after it leaves Maye’s hands and watching his reaction might be my favorite part of this.

North Carolina is hoping that Maye’s confidence and shooting carries into next season since they’ll need him to play a much larger part with the departures of Isaiah Hicks, Kennedy Meeks and Tony Bradley.

(H/t: Jeremy Harson)

Clemson lands three-star Class of 2018 guard John Newman

(AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
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Clemson was able to land a commitment from three-star Class of 2018 shooting guard John Newman on Friday night.

The 6-foot-4 Newman selected the Tigers over his other finalists that included Providence, Virginia and Wake Forest. Newman is coming off of a solid spring with Team CP3 in the Nike EYBL and he also had a good showing at the NBPA Top 100 Camp last week at the University of Virginia.

An aggressive perimeter threat who can score or distribute, Newman can not only put up points in bunches but he’s also pretty efficient in terms of his shooting splits.

Newman put up 11.5 points per game at Top 100 Camp on 55 percent shooting and 53 percent three-point shooting as he looked like one of the more confident scorers in the camp.

The first commitment for Clemson in the Class of 2018, Newman is an important start for what could be a very big recruiting class for the Tigers.