NCAA FGCU Basketball

Is this the most upset-filled NCAA Tournament ever?

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From Florida Gulf Coast to La Salle to Wichita State, this year’s NCAA  Tournament hasn’t been short on upsets. But has it been the most upset-filled tournament ever?

One math professor thinks so.

Jeffery Bergen, who teaches at DePaul Unversity, came up with a formula to decipher whether or not this is true. It involves a point system based on math within the seeds of each team that played in an upset victory.

In this season, those shouldn’t be too hard to find. For starters, three 12 seeds beat three five seeds.

To you, Mr. Bergen:

All we need to do is agree on what an upset is and that not all upsets are created equal. For example, a 6th seed beating an 11th seed is not an upset, a 10th seed beating a 7th seed is a small upset, and a 15th seed beating a 2nd seed is a really big upset.

Every time a lower seed beats a higher seed, we can give that game “upset points” equal to the difference in their seeds.So no. 9 Wichita State’s win over no. 8 Pittsburgh was only worth 1 upset point whereas no. 15 Florida Gulf Coast’s win over no. 2 Georgetown was worth 13 upset points.

By his logic, this tournament received 105 upset points, which is now tied with the 1986 tournament for the most. That year, an 11-seed in LSU crashed the Final Four as well.

Ironically, that was also the year of Louisville’s last national title. Which is also part of Bergen’s system.

Whether 2013 will stand alone as the most upsetting tournament will be determined by Louisville. If Louisville does not win the tournament, then 2013 will stand alone on top. But if Louisville does win the tournament, then 1986 and 2013 will remain tied for the top spot.This somehow seems appropriate. After all, who do you think won the tournament in 1986? Louisville!

Maybe he has a point, but one subjective caveat remains. The title “most upsets” in a tournament can vary. For example, the 2000 and 2011 Final Fours had more surprising entrants, by seed, than any other year, with an 11-seed (VCU) and eight-seed (Butler) in 2011 and two eight seeds (North Carolina and Wisconsin) and a five-seed (Florida) in 2000.

Follow David Harten on Twitter at @David_Harten

Gonzaga’s NCAA tournament chances take a major blow in loss to No. 16 SMU

SMU guard Nic Moore (11) shoots over Gonzaga forward Kyle Wiltjer (33) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016, in Dallas. (AP Photo/Jim Cowsert)
(AP Photo/Jim Cowsert)
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Nic Moore scored 18 of his 25 points in the second half and added 11 assists as No. 16 SMU knocked off Gonzaga in Moody Coliseum on Saturday night, 69-60.

The Zags got 20 points and 16 boards from Domantas Sabonis, but Kyle Wiltjer scored just four points and shot 2-for-17 from the floor.

It wasn’t pretty.

And it may have been the end of Gonzaga’s NCAA tournament hopes.

Entering Saturday, the Zags had an RPI in the mid-60s, enough to keep them in the bubble conversation but not enough to make them anything more than a team that will be projected to end up on the cut-line.

The issue is a complete lack of quality wins on their résumé. Gonzaga beat UConn in the Bahamas. That’s a borderline top 50 win. They beat Washington, another borderline top 50 win. Beyond that? They swept Pepperdine, beat Tennessee and own a win over Montana. None of those are top 100 wins, and that’s why the SMU game was such a big deal. The Mustangs are a top 25 team. This was a road game. This win was the kind of thing that the Zags could pin at the top of their profile.

But Wiltjer didn’t show up, the Zags had no answer for Moore and they’ll head back to Spokane needing, in all likelihood, to win the WCC’s automatic bid if they want to dance.

POSTERIZED: Cal’s Jaylen Brown has his dunk contest entry

California's Jaylen Brown lays up a shot against Oregon State in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016, in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
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Cal picked up a big win over Oregon State in Haas Pavilion on Saturday night, and the exclamation point was this emphatic dunk from Jaylen Brown: