Michigan v Florida

Mental miscues, questionable coaching decisions doom Florida

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In the end, Florida simply dug themselves too big of a hole.

Thanks to some defensive miscues and a poor shooting start, Florida found themselves down 13-0, 20-4 and 41-17 before they woke up. By the time they did, the Gators simply couldn’t get out of their own way, as a series of mental mistakes and curious coaching decisions stunted any comeback attempt.

Florida’s season came to a close when the final horn sounded on Michigan’s 79-59 win.

It was a disappointing finish to a season that had been so promising. Florida was No. 1 in the Kenpom rankings for the majority of the season. They were the only team to rank in the top five of both offensive and defensive efficiency. They won the SEC regular season title, but a season of dominance over mediocre competition was marred by their struggles in close games.

In other words, this Florida team wasn’t one that you wanted to trust in a pressure situation. Playing a former No. 1 ranked team for the right to go to the Final Four in the Jerry Dome on national TV isn’t exactly a walk in the park.

MORE: Photos from the Elite Eight

Florida allowed the Wolverines to make a run early in the game, but that’s not really all that much of a concern. That happens. What was more concerning was the fact that, while watching Michigan pull away, Florida insisted on pounding the ball into their big men. Patric Young was being outplayed by Mitch McGary, while Erik Murphy was being out played by everyone; he finished 0-9 from the floor.

Florida also was apparently incapable of locating Nik Stauskas, who led the way with 22 points for Michigan and whose hot hand midway through the first half blew the game open. Look at his shot chart, via ESPN Stats & Info:

source:

Stauskas loves that corner. I can guarantee that it was in Florida’s scouting report, but if Luke Winn can figure it out, Florida’s coaching staff should. Eventually, even if that was missed, you would think that someone would realize that getting a hand up on Stauskas, after he’s hit three or four in a row from the same corner, would be a smart move.

(Here’s the funny thing: you can’t even credit Michael Frazier for trying to contest a Stauskas three when he committed a foul at the buzzer. He didn’t. He just ran into Stauskas.)

Perhaps the most head-scratching move came early in the second half. Florida had started out on an 8-3 run when Billy Donovan called a timeout immediately after a bucket. The Gators had cut the lead to just 12 points with 15:48 left, but per NCAA tournament rules, Donovan’s timeout would have to be a full-length media timeout: 3:30. When play resumed, McGary scored, Florida threw away the inbounds and Spike Albrecht scored, and then there was a whistle at the other end. Another media timeout, and this time Michigan was down 16 points. The Wolverines scored first out of that break, and that was pretty much it.

Florida’s got a promising future, however.

MORE: Michigan blows out Florida for first Final Four trip since 1993

They may end up losing their top four scorers — three graduate, Young may go pro — but with a solid core of youngsters in their back court, who will be joined by stud freshman Kasey Hill, and some grinders up front (Will Yegeute and Casey Prather) to play alongside five-star recruit Chris Walker, the Gators will have plenty of talent on their roster.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Nigel Hayes’ comment on basketball brands hits on greater point

Wisconsin's Nigel Hayes (10) drives on Ohio State's Jae'Sean Tate (1) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016, in Madison, Wis. Hayes had a team-high 21 points in Wisconsin's 79-68 win. (AP Photo/Andy Manis)
AP Photo/Andy Manis
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Much is made about the ball when it comes to how the sport of basketball is played and rightfully so, as the ball is the most important piece of equipment. Different brands have different characteristics, and with college basketball programs being able to pick the ball they use for home games there are adjustments to be made during the season.

Wisconsin will play at No. 2 Maryland Saturday, meaning that in the days leading up to the game the Badgers needed to get used to the Under Armour basketball. The brand became a conversation point in the aftermath of Maryland’s win over No. 4 Iowa last month, with the Hawkeyes (while not blaming the ball for their loss) made note of the differences between the Under Armour ball and the Nike ball they use for their home games.

Thursday Wisconsin forward Nigel Hayes offered up his observations on the basketball while also pointing out (albeit sarcastically) the goal of intercollegiate athletics.

“It’s definitely different,” Hayes said. “Personally, we don’t like it too much. I don’t like the Under Armour ball whatsoever. But that’s the way this amateur sports league is set up. We’re supposed to be having fun, but all the money is in these basketballs that colleges play with. But it’s an amateur sport, we’re just here for fun. It’s not really that serious. So I guess any ball should be OK.

“Maybe we should have a universal ball like the NBA. You don’t go to the Clippers’ stadium and play with a Nike and then go to Golden State and play with a Rawlings. But in this amateur sport of college, where money isn’t the goal — it’s the student education and experience that you get — we play with a million different basketballs.”

Hayes makes a good point here, and in regards to the NBA all hell would break loose under similar circumstances (remember the leather vs. microfiber composite controversy in 2006?). If these games are solely about fun and the college experience, wouldn’t having one ball used by all schools better fit that mission? This isn’t the biggest of deals when it comes to “amateur” athletics, as different basketball brands have been used for years.

But Hayes was able to take this situation and work it into the discussion of the goals of intercollegiate athletics. Is it about the experience? Or does the ability to profit, be it through a minor move such as using a particular ball or the more impactful step of moving from one conference to another, take precedence? Given the shifts that have occurred in college sports in recent years, it’s quite apparent that the search for additional revenue streams has won out.

Hayes did note that neither he nor his teammates would make excuses, saying that the team would simple “have to get used to” the unfamiliar basketball according to the Wisconsin State Journal. In the end, this was a good use of sarcasm by Hayes to make a greater point about the collegiate athletics machine he and his teammates are but minor parts of.

Marquette fan sends Providence money for missed free throw

Providence's Kris Dunn reacts to his shot during the first half of an NCAA basketball game against Villanova, Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Chris Szagola)
AP Photo/Chris Szagola
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It goes without saying that sports can inspire some interesting promises, from players and coaches guaranteeing victory to fans making statements that hinge on the outcome of a particular game or play (see: tattoos celebrating a team’s triumphs before they’ve even won the game in question). For one Marquette fan, the need for Providence’s Kris Dunn to miss a free throw during Wednesday night’s game (which Marquette won in overtime) inspired him to make a promise that he intended to keep.

Jamey Schilling took the approach of yelling that he’d pay Dunn $10 if he missed the free throw. Sure enough Dunn missed the shot, and Schilling made good on his promise. But with players themselves unable to receive such funds due to NCAA rules, Schilling sent the check to the Providence athletic department.

Schilling’s gesture did not go unnoticed by Marquette either, as the school sent him a gift card to use in the Marquette Spirit Shop.

H/T For The Win