Marquette v Miami

Hurricanes go ice cold, miss 41 shots in Sweet 16 loss to Marquette

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WASHINGTON, D.C. — Never has MIA been a more fitting nickname for Miami.

The Miami Hurricanes entered Thursday night’s NCAA tournament East regional semifinal with Marquette as one of the nation’s top field-goal shooting teams and were ranked in the top-50 in effective field-goal percentage. But after 20 minutes of play, the No. 2-seed Hurricanes had just 16 points on 6-for-29 shooting, including a paltry 1-for-11 from beyond the arc. The second half wasn’t much better, and the end result was a disappointing 71-61 loss to Marquette at the Verizon Center.

Just three Hurricane players scored in double-figures. Shane Larkin finished with 14 points, Kenny Kadji added 11 points and Durand Scott chipped in with ten. But Kadji went 5-for-12 from the field and Scott finished 3-for-13.

Marquette made it a goal to force Larkin to rely on his teammates for offensive production, and while the Hurricanes got some open looks, very few of them fell in. “They did a great job in guarding the ball screen,” said sophomore guard Shane Larkin, who was just one of three Miami players to shoot at least 50% from the field. “They were pretty much trapping me and trying to get the ball out of my hands, and it was frustrating not being able to attack it because they were trying to get it out of my hands.”

While Marquette did have a great game plan, much of Miami’s struggles were self-inflicted.

“This is fact, it’s not fiction, it’s not an excuse. We didn’t prepare for this game,” said head coach Jim Larranaga following his team’s season-ending loss. “we didn’t practice on Monday. On Tuesday in the first rebounding drill we did, Durand Scott caught an elbow in the mouth. We didn’t have him, and then Raphael Akpejiori hurt his hand. We didn’t have him. We only have 11 scholarship guys eligible, we were down to 8 so practice wasn’t great without Durand, Reggie (Johnson), and last night Shane Larkin ended up throwing up all night, didn’t eat this morning, didn’t eat until the pregame meal at 3:00, so I think those guys didn’t have the juice that they normally do.”

Miami didn’t play terrible, but when an opponent is hitting shots and you aren’t, things don’t tend to work in your favor. “The game is very simple,” said Larranaga. “There are only two things you have to do in basketball one put the ball in the basket, two, stop the other team from putting the ball in the basket. We weren’t able to do either.”

Marquette finished 27-for-50 (54%) from the field, their best NCAA tournament shooting performance since the 2003 Elite Eight against Kentucky, in which they shot 56.4-percent from the field. But it also helped the Golden Eagles that Miami was missing their biggest space-eater, Reggie Johnson, who did not make the trip due to minor knee surgery.

“We definitely missed Reggie tonight,” said Larkin. “I think his size could have affected Otule and Gardner and they just played a great game. You can’t take anything away from them. There is no excuse on our end. Somebody had to step up and we as a team didn’t do that tonight.”

This was a Miami team that may predicted to win the East region and advance to the Final Four. You have to win fours game to make it to the Final Four, and usually, a team has to win one game in which they didn’t have their best performance but still found a way to win. For whatever reason, Miami could not find a way to win.

It also doesn’t help when you miss 41 shots. Miami took 63 shots on Thursday night and made just 22 of them.

Now that Fort Myers, Fla., is affectionately known as “Dunk City”, Coral Gables might have to stick with the trend and change their name to “Brick City’.

You can contact Troy Machir on Twitter at @TroyMachir.

USC athletic director Pat Haden to step down in June

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LOS ANGELES (AP) University of Southern California athletic director Pat Haden says he will retire on June 30.

USC President Max Nikias made the announcement Friday.

Haden has run the athletic department for 5 1/2 years, leading the Trojans through a multiyear stretch of NCAA sanctions against its vaunted football program. He created a large NCAA compliance program and improved graduation rates and grade point averages across the athletic department.

The former USC quarterback also received criticism for the football program’s relative underachievement and for his handling of coach Steve Sarkisian, who has sued the school over his termination last year.

Nikias says Haden’s department also raised over $400 million during his tenure.

Nikias says Haden will start a one-year job guiding the renovation of the Coliseum after he retires.

PREGAME SHOOTAROUND: Ivy League’s best meet in New Haven

Columbia guard Maodo Lo, right, steals the ball from Northwestern forward Aaron Falzon, left, during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game on Friday, Nov. 20, 2015, in Evanston, Ill.  (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh
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GAME OF THE NIGHT: Columbia at Yale, 5:00 p.m.

The two best teams in the Ivy League, with matching 4-0 league records, meet for the first time this season. The Lions were close to suffering their first loss last weekend, but an Alex Rosenberg jumper as time expired gave the Lions the win at reigning champion Harvard. Rosenberg’s one of four players averaging at least 12.2 points per game for Kyle Smith’s team, with senior guard Maodo Lo leading the way at 15.8 per contest.

They’ll face a Yale rotation led offensively by point guard Makai Mason (15.7 ppg, 4.1 apg), and the front court tandem of Justin Sears and Brandon Sherrod has been outstanding. The winner get a leg up in the Ivy race, with the rematch scheduled for March 5 in New York City (regular season finale).

THIS ONE’S GOOD TOO: Central Michigan at Akron, 8:00 p.m.

Two of the top teams in the Mid-American Conference meet at the JAR, as Akron looks to extend its win streak to six straight. The Zips’ balanced offensive attack has been led by forward Isaiah Johnson (12.5 ppg, 7.6 rpg), who currently leads the team in both scoring and rebounding. As for the visiting Chippewas, guards Braylon Rayson and Chris Fowler combine to average 32.7 points per game, with Fowler also responsible for a MAC-best 6.3 assists per contest. CMU’s had some struggles on the defensive glass in league play, ranking 11th in that category, but they’ve done a better job defensively than they did in non-conference play.

OTHER NOTABLE GAMES

  • MAAC leader Monmouth is back in action, as they host a Fairfield team led by one of the conference’s best players in senior forward Marcus Gilbert. The Hawks have a deep lineup led by junior guard Justin Robinson, who at this point in time is the likely frontrunner for MAAC Player of the Year honors.
  • Looking to catch Monmouth is Iona, which is a game behind the Hawks at 9-3. A.J. English and the Gaels visit Canisius in a matchup that should not lack for offense. Iona’s more inclined to run, but Canisius doesn’t lack scorers either with guard Malcolm McMillan leading four players averaging double figures.
  • Given the fact that they’re 1-3 in Ivy League play, Harvard’s essentially in the spoiler role unless some chaos breaks out at the top end of the standings. The Crimson can help in that regard with a win at Princeton, with the Tigers (2-1) a game behind Columbia and Yale in the loss column. Princeton’s been the better offensive team this season, thanks in large part to junior forward Henry Caruso who leads the team in both scoring and rebounding.