The Morning Mix

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What a weekend. The first weekend is finally in the books, and it’s pretty clear that the craziness we saw during the regular season carried over into March Madness. We were introduced to Dunk City, Florida (Coined by yours truely. Yes I was the first to use it, no I did not receive any credit for it), and saw Gonzaga make a shocking exit in the third round.

Naturally, we’ve got a lot to get to.

So let’s hit the links.

Observations & Insight:
– Aaron Craft hit the biggest shot of the 2013 NCAA tournament, a buzzer-beating 3-pointer to defeat Iowa State. Here’s how it happened. (USA Today)

– Ben Howland is out at UCLA. The Bruins need more than what Howland could give them, and that’s OK. (Los Angeles Times)

– Is this the last time we see Jim Boeheim in the NCAA tournament? Will Rhoden of the New York Times certainly thinks so. (New York Times)

– Gonzaga fans had a tough pill to swallow on Saturday night, as the Bulldogs’ dream season came to an abrupt stop against Wichita State. (Slipper Still Fits)

– The best and worst from the NCAA Tournament’s first weekend. (The Dagger)

– More best and worst from the tournament’s first weekend. (Washington Post)
 
 
Odds & Ends:
– A transcript of Buzz Williams’ entertaining press conference following Marquette’s third round victory over Butler. (Washington Post)

– Twitter reacts to the controversial ending to Iowa State/Ohio State. (The Dagger)

– A profile on the Colorado State Rams’ superfan Justin Stank. He’s the guy in the funny rams suit. (New York Times)
 
 
.GIFs & Videos:
– Florida Gulf Coast is famous. And this is why. #DunkCity. (Eye on College Basketball)

– Oh yeah, they did this too. (SB Nation)

– Florida Gulf Coast, located in Dunk City, Florida, now has a rap anthem. (College Basketball Talk)

– The best .GIFs from the first weekend. (College Hoops Journal)

– Wichita State head coach Gregg Marshall cut loose following his team’s third round victory over Gonzaga. (The Dagger

– Iowa State freshman Georges Niang tried to rattle Aaron Craft with an “inadvertent” shoulder to the chest. (The Big Lead)

Sad UNC bro starts to cry during Tar Heel’s loss to Kansas. (Kentucky Sports Radio)

– Allen Crabbe got hit in the junk. Ouch. (The Big Lead)
 
 
Hoops Housekeeping:
– George Mason will move from the CAA to the Atlantic 10, effective July. (The Hatchet)

– Minnesota coach Tubby Smith has been on the hot seat for a long long time. The Golden Gophers defeated UCLA in the second round before falling to Florida in the third round. Was one tournament victory enough to save his job? (College Basketball Talk)

– A fired destroyed the house of Syracuse’s Michael Carter-Williams on Saturday night. Thankfully none of Carter-Williams’ family members were injured. (Syracuse Post-Standard)

– UNLV freshman phenom Anthony Bennett is headed to the NBA. He’s a lottery pick for sure, probably top-5 too. (Eye on College Basketball)

– Oregon State big-man Eric Moreland is declaring for the NBA Draft. (Sporting News)

– Memphis is looking to extend the contract of head coach Josh Pastner. (Memphis Commercial Appeal)

– Arizona beat the teeth out of Harvard on Saturday. Seriously, Siyana Chambers lost a tooth. (Arizona Daily Star)

– UCLA may have or may have not fired Ben Howland. He’s probably fired, but nobody’s exactly sure. (College Basketball Talk)

– According to Adrian Wojnarowski, Iowa State head coach Fred Hoiberg has emerged as a potential candidate for a heading coach position in the NBA. (Yahoo Sports)

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Vance Jackson transfers to New Mexico

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With more than a handful of departures this offseason, New Mexico is set to have a new-look roster for the 2017-18 season. On Monday, Paul Weir, now at the helm of the program, landed a player who should make an impact in the three remaining seasons of eligibility he has left.

Vance Jackson, who spent this past season at UConn, decided to make the move from Storrs to Albuquerque, picking the Lobos over Rutgers, San Diego State, TCU, and Washington.

The 6-foot-8 rising sophomore will have to sit out next year due to NCAA transfer rules before resuming his collegiate career in the fall of 2018.

“The coaches — they trust in me,” Jackson told Geoff Grammer of the Albuquerque Journal last month during his official campus visit. “We’re on the same page. They see a vision.”

Weir, who led New Mexico State this past season to a NCAA Tournament appearance in his one and only season as head coach, succeeded Craig Neal in April.

This offseason has been headlined by transfers, though, those mostly were about players leaving the program. Jackson is the second transfer to land at UNM with Akron’s Antino Jackson electing to use his final season of eligibility with the Lobos. Antino Jackson is a graduate transfer, allowing him to play immediately next season.

Vance Jackson, who was rated as the No. 80 overall player in the Class of 2016 by Rivals, averaged 8.1 points, 3.8 rebounds, and 1.4 assists per game while shooting just under 40 percent from three for the Huskies as a freshman.

Adam Silver on lowering NBA Draft age minimum: ‘It’s on the table’

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NBA commissioner Adam Silver joined Dan Patrick this morning and was again questioned about the potential of the NBA changing the age limit to declare for the draft.

“If you’d asked me that a year ago, I would have said ‘if I didn’t have to negotiate this with the union, I would have raised the age minimum to 20 from 19,'” Silver told Patrick. When pressed on it, Silver said, “It’s a possible option. It’s on the table,” adding that it will be discussed by the union and in an owner’s meeting, and that he still doesn’t know what he thinks the best answer is.

But the big news is that he’s actively considering a change.

I wrote a long piece about the one-and-done rule and why the topic of what’s best for the kids is incredibly complicated. Owners don’t want to pay teenagers millions of dollars to develop; they’d rather let them develop in college and have an extra season or two on the back-end, when the player is in his prime. The players don’t want to spend a year in college, but the marketing and branding opportunities for them — not to mention to booster money that is floating around on a college campus — makes going to college a better option that going to the G-League, and that’s to say nothing of the fancy dorms, private flights and perks of being a celebrity on a college campus.

The truth is probably this: The NBA is trying to take control of basketball’s feeder systems. And I’m not just talking about making the G-League a better option than the collegiate ranks.

“It’s no longer an issue of 19 to 18 or 19 to 20,” Silver said. “I think it means that we as the NBA need to do something that we’ve avoided, which is getting more involved in youth basketball. If you sit with the folks from Nike or Under Armour or Adidas, they can tell you who the top 100 14 year olds are in the world, and there’s a fairly close correlation between the top 100 at 14 and the top 100 at 18.”

“Then I look at some of the players coming in internationally who are becoming full time professional basketball players, as we see in soccer, at 16 years old,” he added. “And they’re on a better development program and a more holistic one, in terms of injury prevention and monitoring in terms of control over them.”

This is a really nuanced decision, and again, if it interests you, I would encourage you to read what I wrote last week before listening to the hot take mafia work this story line over.

Because the fact of the matter is that there is a lot more to consider here than simply whether or not high school seniors should be allowed to go directly to the NBA.

Washington lands four-star forward Hameir Wright

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Washington and new head coach Mike Hopkins snagged another talented piece on Saturday as four-star forward Hameir Wright committed to the Huskies.

The reigning New York State Gatorade Player of the Year, Wright had was originally supposed to be a member of the Class of 2018, but he will skip his scheduled season at Brewster Academy to join Washington for the 2017-18 season.

The 6-foot-7 Wright was being pursued by a solid list of high-major programs this summer as Washington was able to land another talented player from upstate New York for next season. Wright joins wing Naz Carter, the nephew of Jay Z, as recent commits who can come in and play next season for the Huskies.

Hopkins has used his former connections as a Syracuse assistant to get his roster two immediate pieces that could be four-year players. It’s a really positive start for the first-year head coach as he has a lot of holes to fill on the Washington roster.

VIDEO: Luke Maye continues hitting big shots this summer for North Carolina

(Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
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Luke Maye became a local hero during North Carolina’s 2017 NCAA tournament run after making the game-winning jumper to get past Kentucky in the Elite Eight.

Maye has received standing ovations in class, he’s been recognized at baseball games and he’s become a celebrity since returning to Chapel Hill.

The legend of Maye will continue to grow after the junior forward knocked down another game-winning jumper against former North Carolina players during the summer Roy Williams Basketball Camp.

With a sizable camp crowd watching, Maye knocked down a top-of-the-key three last week to get the win. Theo Pinson knows the shot is good right after it leaves Maye’s hands and watching his reaction might be my favorite part of this.

North Carolina is hoping that Maye’s confidence and shooting carries into next season since they’ll need him to play a much larger part with the departures of Isaiah Hicks, Kennedy Meeks and Tony Bradley.

(H/t: Jeremy Harson)

Clemson lands three-star Class of 2018 guard John Newman

(AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
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Clemson was able to land a commitment from three-star Class of 2018 shooting guard John Newman on Friday night.

The 6-foot-4 Newman selected the Tigers over his other finalists that included Providence, Virginia and Wake Forest. Newman is coming off of a solid spring with Team CP3 in the Nike EYBL and he also had a good showing at the NBPA Top 100 Camp last week at the University of Virginia.

An aggressive perimeter threat who can score or distribute, Newman can not only put up points in bunches but he’s also pretty efficient in terms of his shooting splits.

Newman put up 11.5 points per game at Top 100 Camp on 55 percent shooting and 53 percent three-point shooting as he looked like one of the more confident scorers in the camp.

The first commitment for Clemson in the Class of 2018, Newman is an important start for what could be a very big recruiting class for the Tigers.