Butler v Marquette

Breaking Down the Sweet 16: Key matchups in each game

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We’re down to the Sweet 16, when teams will have more time to study unfamiliar opponents and figure out what needs to be done in order to advance. With that in mind, here are the key individual match-ups for each of the eight Sweet 16 games that will be played later this week.

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East Region

No. 3 Marquette vs. No. 2 Miami: Vander Blue vs. Durand Scott

Both Blue and Scott are expected by their respective teams to score, so their work on the defensive end will be just as important in this matchup on Thursday night. Despite the fact that Blue shot 50% from three in wins over Davidson and Butler, the fact remains that he’s just a 30.9% shooter from deep and relies on dribble penetration for the majority of his points. That’s where Scott, ACC Defensive Player of the Year, enters the equation. If he can keep Blue from getting to the rim too often Miami has the advantage.

No. 4 Syracuse vs. No. 1 Indiana: Victor Oladipo vs. Michael Carter-Williams

Given Carter-Williams’ 6-6 height it is highly unlikely that either Jordan Hulls or Yogi Ferrell will be asked to defend him much on Thursday. Look for Oladipo, one of the best defenders in the country, to get the assignment because as Carter-Williams goes so go the Orange. In Syracuse’s blowout of Montana the sophomore accounted for nine assists and two turnovers, but followed that up with three assists and five turnovers in a 66-60 win over Cal. In his last seven games Carter-Williams is averaging 7.1 assists and 4.1 turnovers per game, and if Oladipo’s pressure can keep Carter-Williams’ assist tally down Indiana will be in good shape.

West Region

No. 13 La Salle vs. No. 9 Wichita State: Jerrell Wright vs. Carl Hall

A very good argument can be made that the battle between Wichita State’s Malcolm Armstead and La Salle’s Tyreek Duren is the matchup to watch, but the Explorers’ lack of front court depth makes Wright vs. Hall the choice. With Steve Zack (foot) out the 6-8 Wright, who averaged 14.5 points and 6.0 rebounds in wins over Kansas State and Ole Miss, has to stay on the floor. He did a good job of that in Kansas City, and against a front court led by the active Hall that will need to be the case in Los Angeles as well if the Explorers are to advance. As for the Shockers Hall will need to be more active on the glass, as he grabbed just one rebound in the win over Gonzaga after grabbing six against Pittsburgh.

No. 6 Arizona vs. No. 2 Ohio State: Mark Lyons vs. Aaron Craft 

Easy choice here. Arizona’s had issues with turnovers at times and the decision-making of Lyons has come into play on multiple occasions this season. Neither of those issues can sprout up if the Wildcats are to beat the Buckeyes, and with Craft being one of the best defenders in the country he’s more than capable of causing some chaos if Lyons (and the other perimeter contributors) don’t take care of the basketball. In wins over Belmont and Harvard the Xavier transfer played very well, averaging 25.0 points per game and shooting 62.5% from the field, but Ohio State is far superior to either of those teams.

Midwest Region

No. 12 Oregon vs. No. 1 Louisville: Dominic Artis vs. Russ Smith 

After averaging 11.5 turnovers per game in Pac-12 tournament wins over Washington and Utah, Oregon’s turned the ball over an average of 17 times in their last three games (and on the season they turn the ball over on 21.5% of their possessions). They’re not going to get away with that against Louisville, making it very important that Artis (and Johnathan Loyd) take care of the basketball against the Louisville pressure. Russ Smith was their most tenacious perimeter defender last weekend, averaging 5.0 steals (eight vs. North Carolina A&T) to go along with his 25.0 points per game.

No. 3 Michigan State vs. No. 2 Duke: Adreian Payne vs. Ryan Kelly 

Will it be the 6-10 Payne or athletic forward Branden Dawson who sees more time guarding Kelly on Friday? Look for Payne to be the answer and he was solid in wins over Valparaiso and Memphis, averaging 10.5 points (47.3% FG) and 7.0 rebounds per game. There’s no denying Kelly’s importance to the Duke attack but the Blue Devils picked up two victories in Philadelphia despite his struggles. Kelly scored just nine points total in wins over Albany and Creighton, shooting 3-of-13 in the two games. If a similar performance happens against Michigan State however, the Blue Devils may not be as fortunate.

South Region

No. 4 Michigan vs. No. 1 Kansas: Trey Burke vs. Elijah Johnson

In Burke Michigan has the best point guard, and arguably the best player, in the country and if Kansas is to advance they’ll need to slow down the sophomore. But that’s just part of the task for Johnson, who did not play particularly well in wins over Western Kentucky and North Carolina. The senior shot a combined 2-of-12 in those games, averaging 3.0 assists and 2.5 turnovers per game. And given Burke’s ability as well as his taking care of the basketball (those seven turnovers against VCU were an anomaly), the Jayhawks need need Johnson to be at his best if they’re to win.

No. 15 Florida Gulf Coast vs. No. 3 Florida: Brett Comer vs. Scottie Wilbekin

While the dunks thrown down by FGCU have been highly entertaining the play of Comer is a big reason why the Eagles are the first 15-seed to reach the Sweet 16. In wins over Georgetown and San Diego State the sophomore averaged 12.0 assists and 2.5 turnovers per game, and the Gators will in all likelihood look to Wilbekin to slow him down. Wilbekin, who averages just 1.5 steals per game, is more the defender who looks to keep the offensive player from getting to his preferred spots on the floor and that will be critical given how lethal Comer can be in ball-screen situations. Keep Comer in check and the Gators have to like their chances of getting back to the Elite 8.

Raphielle also writes for the NBE Basketball Report and can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

Illinois State ends No. 21 Wichita State’s 12-game win streak

Fred VanVleet
AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki
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Having won 12 straight games, No. 21 Wichita State entered the weekend one of the hottest teams in the country. And with a four-game lead atop the Missouri Valley standings, clinching the regular season title was more a matter of “when” as opposed to “if.” But none of that mattered Saturday night at Illinois State, as the Redbirds managed to hand the Shockers their first conference loss by the final score of 58-53.

In addition to the 12-game win streak, which was second to Stony Brook (15 straight wins), Wichita State also saw its 19-game win streak in Valley regular season games come to an end. Illinois State was the last Valley team to beat Wichita State, eliminating the Shockers in the Arch Madness semifinals last March, and they played with the confidence of a team that believed it could win.

And after a rough first half the Redbirds found a way to come back, erasing a 16-point second half deficit in the process.

Wichita State’s issue in the second half was the fact that they couldn’t make shots. The Shockers shot just 26.7 percent from the field and 1-for-14 from three in the second half, with Fred VanVleet going scoreless and Shaq Morris scoring just one point. And just two players, Ron Baker and Conner Frankamp, managed to make multiple field goals in the game’s final 20 minutes. Illinois State certainly deserves credit for that, as they took away the quality looks Wichita State was able to find in building its lead.

And on the other end of the floor Paris Lee took control of the game during Illinois State’s comeback, scoring 13 of his 19 points in the second half with Deontae Hawkins adding 11 second-half points. Illinois State was even worse from the field, finishing the game shooting just over 27 percent from the field. But they were able to attack the Wichita State defense and get to the foul line, outscoring the Shockers 22-9 from the charity stripe. And in a game in which neither team could get much going offensively, the ability to get points from the line proved to be the difference.

This defeat doesn’t help Wichita State, but did anything really change? Maybe the margin for error when it comes to an at-large bid gets a little smaller with the loss in the eyes of some. But when considering injuries to the likes of VanVleet and Anton Grady in non-conference play, those early season losses are understandable. Saturday was a rough night for Wichita State, but given the maturity and talent on at Gregg Marshall’s disposal the Shockers will be fine moving forward.

VIDEO: New Mexico loses game on blown call by officials

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Nothing like a nice, controversial finish to get the blood flowing.

New Mexico was on the receiving end of a rule misinterpretation on Saturday afternoon, and that interpretation likely cost the Lobos a win over San Diego State and, arguably, a shot at the MWC regular season title.

Here’s the situation: New Mexico is up by three with 12 seconds left and the ball under their own basket. Their allowed to run the baseline, so Craig Neal calls a play where the inbounder throws the ball to a player running out of bounds.

Totally league as long as the player establishes out of bounds before touching the ball. The referee rules that he doesn’t.

Here’s the video:

The problem?

According to the rules, Xavier Adams — the player receiving the pass from Cullen Neal — only needed one foot on the floor out of bounds in order to establish himself as an inbounder that was able to catch that ball. He got one foot down (see the picture above), but the referees appeared to rule that he needed to have both feet down.

That was incorrect, according to the Mountain West office.

“While this was a very close judgment call made at full speed, it has been determined after careful review of slow-motion video replays the call was in fact incorrect,” the league said in a release. “The New Mexico player did get one foot down (two feet are not required) out-of-bounds before receiving the ball, thus establishing his location in accordance NCAA Basketball Playing Rules 4.23.1.a and 7.1.1.  By rule, the officials were not permitted to go to the monitor during the game to review this play.”

And here’s the kicker: When SDSU got the ball back, they hit a three to send the game into overtime, where the Aztecs won. But if New Mexico had won this game, they’d be sitting at 8-2 in MWC play, one game behind SDSU in the loss column with a return game against them in The Pit.

Instead, they’re now three games back with seven to play, meaning that the race is effectively over.

It’s tough to blame the referees here — it was a bang-bang call that is only clear in slow-motion replay — but man, that’s a big call to miss.