VCU v Michigan

Michigan makes Havoc look Harmless, moves on to the Sweet 16

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For the second time in three days, No. 4 seed Michigan made the pundits that earned them “trendy upset pick” status look foolish.

On Thursday, the Wolverines shut down South Dakota State and the Fighting Nate Wolters, winning by 15 points in a game that Trey Burke decided not to show up. Saturday’s performance against No. 5 seed VCU was much more impressive, however. Michigan made Havoc seem Harmless, carving up VCU’s vaunted press while ripping the life-blood — effort and tenacity — out of the hearts of the Rams.

The 78-53 win may have been the most impressive performance of the tournament to date.

And for the second straight game, Michigan did it despite the fact that their superstar — our National Player of the Year — played far from his best game.

A quick glance at the box score won’t tell you much, as Burke finished with 18 points and six assists. But he also committed seven of Michigan’s 12 turnovers and seemed to have the most trouble handling VCU’s press of anyone on the Michigan roster.

But that didn’t matter. Tim Hardaway Jr. played very well early in the first half, dribbling through VCU’s pressure and helping to force VCU from abandoning the strategy of double-teaming Burke before the ball was inbounded to keep it out of his hands. Glenn Robinson III finished with 14 points and nine boards, giving him 35 points and 15 boards during the first weekend while shooting 15-19 from the floor.

And then there was Mitch McGary.

The big center has taken over the starting role from Jordan Morgan, and based on the way that he played on Saturday, he won’t be giving it back anytime soon. McGary had 21 points on 10-11 shooting and grabbed 14 boards, and while his production was impressive, McGary provided so much more. He drilled VCU’s resident ballhawk Briante Weber twice with (legal) screens. He grabbed a defensive rebound at one end and sprinted down the floor, getting a dunk at the other end. He dove on the floor. He bodied up Juvonte Reddic. He made every single hustle play that he was physically capable of.

Many of the points that McGary scored were the result of a) being set up by his teammates for an open dunk or b) grabbing an offensive rebound or coming up with a loose ball in the right spot at the right time.

McGary set the tone against a team that prides themselves on setting the tone. He provided toughness and effort against a team that thrives on toughness and effort. He played a huge role in killing the spirit of the Rams on Saturday.

Scott Van Pelt has a saying that he uses on Sportscenter quite often: “How good is your good?”

Michigan proved this weekend that their good is really, really good.

Now imagine what happens when Trey Burke really gets it going.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Sun Belt approves new scheduling format

Sun Belt Conference
Sun Belt Conference
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With an 11-member setup the Sun Belt Conference has played a 20-game conference schedule the last couple of years, which may be seen as a positive when it comes to determining the regular season champion (home-and-home between every team). But for a conference that spans from North Carolina (Appalachian State) to Texas (UT-Arlington, Texas State) travel was far from easy in that setup.

And with Coastal Carolina joining next season, it was clear that the league needed to do something with its scheduling.

Thursday the Sun Belt members approved an 18-game conference schedule, which will begin with the 2016-17 season when the league consists of 12 members. Included in the agreement is the assignment of travel partners (similar to setups in the Pac-12 and Ivy League), and teams playing no more than three consecutive conference games on the road.

Schools will also be guaranteed at least five weekend home games during conference play, and there will be no more weekends in which teams play conference games both home and away (thus cutting down on travel). Obviously with the addition of Coastal Carolina the Sun Belt needed to make some changes in their scheduling, and this week the conference made the moves they needed to make.

Former Wichita State assistant returns as a consultant

Chris Jans, Gregg Marshall
Associated Press
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Prior to a one-year stint as the head coach coach at Bowling Green that came to an end in early April as a result of an incident at a Bowling Green restaurant, Chris Jans was a member of Gregg Marshall’s coaching staff at Wichita State from 2007-14. During those seven seasons Jans was a key figure as the Shockers made the progression to a respected national power.

Jans is back in Wichita, with Paul Suellentrop of the Wichita Eagle reporting Thursday that he’s serving as a consultant to the program. Jans’ consulting agreement runs for 45 days, which the school can renew, and he’ll be paid $10,000 for the work. While Jans isn’t allowed to do any coaching, he can watch practices and provide Marshall and the coaching staff with his observations.

“He will be able to consult with the coaching staff, only on what he observes in practice,” said Darron Boatright, WSU deputy athletics director. “By NCAA rule, a consultant is not allowed to have communication with student-athletes … not about basketball-related activities or performance.”

While Jans (who according to the story has served in a similar role for another school) can’t do any coaching in this role, his return does give Marshall another trusted voice to call upon when needed. Wichita State bid farewell to an assistant coach this spring with Steve Forbes being hired as the head coach at East Tennessee State, with his position being filled by former Sunrise Christian Academy coach Kyle Lindsted.