Florida Gulf Coast v Georgetown

Georgetown been upset in the first weekend four straight years


It wasn’t even a discussion on Friday night: the No. 15 seed Florida Gulf Coast Eagles were far and away the best team on the floor at the Wells Fargo Center in Philly, knocking off No. 2 seed Georgetown 78-68.

All the credit in the world must be given to FGCU, who came out and not-so-metaphorically punched Georgetown in the face. The Hoyas, who were down 24-22 at the half, watched as the Eagles used a 28-9 run punctuated by dunk after dunk to open the second half.

FGCU was throwing alley-oops. Plural. On a Big East co-champion. Think about that.

What’s more disturbing is that this isn’t exactly an anomaly at this point. For the fourth consecutive season and for the fifth time in six years, Georgetown has been knocked out of the NCAA tournament by a double-digit seed.

– In 2008, they were the second victim of heavyweight serial killer Stephen Curry, losing to No. 10 seed Davidson in the second round as a No. 2 seed.

– In 2010, No. 3 seed Georgetown lost 97-83 to the DJ Cooper-led Ohio Bobcats in the first round in a game that they simply never seemed to have a chance.

– The same thing happened in 2011, when No. 11 seed VCU, fresh off of a win in the play-in game, drubbed the Hoyas 74-56 in the opening round of the tournament.

– Last year, No. 11 seed NC State picked off No. 3 seed Georgetown 66-63.

The biggest concern here isn’t the losses, although five straight disappointing tournament performances — in 2009, Georgetown went from being a top ten team to the NIT — is not exactly the kind of resume that a coach wants to put together. (It should be noted, ironically enough, that Georgetown made the Final Four in 2007.)

The concern is the utter lack of preparedness and energy that the Hoyas have shown in three of these losses.

Look, the way that the NCAA tournament is built, upsets are always going to happen. Whether it’s the result of a team or a player getting hot or a horrid matchup stylistically, in a one-and-done tournament format, there are going to be better teams that lose. It’s what makes March great and, if you’re on the wrong side of the final score, agonizingly painful.

But you want to at least see a team on the floor that’s ready to play.

And that’s what Georgetown has lacked in recent tournaments. They were run out of the gym by Ohio. They were run out of the gym by VCU. And on Friday night, they weren’t just run out of the gym, but they were blown out and dunked on and thoroughly embarrassed.

That’s a problem.

And there are going to have to be some questions answered.

Why isn’t Georgetown ready to play in March? Why are they coming out without energy or fire or passion? Why does it take a 19 point second half deficit for the Hoyas to finally wake up?

Is this an issue of leadership?

Is this simply a mental block? Do the Hoyas know that their M.O. is to get upset in the first weekend of the tournament?

Whatever the case may be, something here has to be fixed.

Because this isn’t a simply case of bad luck anymore.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Wichita State’s Anton Grady improving after being hospitalized

James Woodard, Anton Grady, Ron Baker
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Wichita State senior forward Anton Grady received some positive news on Saturday as a neurosurgeon reviewed MRI results, which are negative for spinal cord trauma.

According to a release from Wichita State, doctors believed Grady suffered a spinal cord concussion during a collision on Friday after he was taken off the floor in a stretcher and taken to a hospital in an ambulance. CT and MRI scans on Friday both turned up negative, but the news of Saturday’s results are an even more encouraging sign for Grady.

The injury for Grady occurred during a Friday loss to Alabama during the AdvoCare Invitational as the senior’s condition has improved since the collision. Grady will receive physical therapy over the next few days and doctors will check his progress before he is released from the hospital.

Grady has been alert and responsive to questions and had feeling in his extremities on Friday, but the use of his arms and legs was limited. By Saturday morning, Grady had improved the use of his extremities.

The 6-foot-8 Grady has averaged 9 points and 6 rebounds per game this season in his first season with the Shockers. The Cleveland State transfer is shooting 39 percent from the field.

Colorado’s Tory Miller reprimanded by Pac-12 after biting opponent

Dusan Ristic, Tory Miller
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Colorado sophomore forward Tory Miller has been reprimanded by the Pac-12 and he also apologized for biting Air Force’s Hayden Graham earlier this week.

During Colorado’s win over Air Force on Wednesday, Miller was assessed a Flagrant 2 Dead Ball Technical Foul and ejected with 12:25 left in the second half after biting Graham during a loose ball.

In a release from the Pac-12, they announced reprimanding Miller, but he will not be suspended.

“All of our student-athletes must adhere to the Pac-12’s Standards of Conduct and Sportsman-ship,” Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott said in the release. “Regardless of Mr. Miller’s frustration and emotion, such behavior is unacceptable and he is being appropriately reprimanded.”

Miller also released his apology in the same release.

“I would like to apologize for my actions during the Air Force game. I would like to apologize to Hayden Graham, Air Force, my teammates and fans. It was a heat of the moment thing. I’m an emotional player, but I let my emotions get the best of me. I will use this as a learning experience and focus on helping my teammates and respecting my opponents for the rest of the season and beyond,” Miller said.

For Miller to not be suspended for this is good news for him and Colorado since he won’t miss any additional action, but did the Pac-12 make the right decision on this?