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Ten moments that defined March Madness (plus two the NCAA won’t show you)

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If you have come recently to the love of college basketball, you may know the term “March Madness”, but have no real grasp on what that vague notion really means. There are some signature moments that have happened over the years that codified the unpredictable beauty of this time of year, and I aim to share a few of them with those who might not know the rich history of college hoops and the NCAA tournament.

The first ten moments I chose are canon. They can be viewed by visiting the NCAA’s video gallery of great moments selected by their staff. Not content to parrot the party line, I’ve added two more at the end that don’t show up on that list.

First, the Ten:

1. Magic vs. Bird (1979): As the inestimable Seth Davis chronicled in his book When March Went Mad: The Game That Transformed Basketball, this was the moment that the NCAA Tournament became a true national spectacle. The perfect storm of national television coverage (35 percent of all American TVs were tuned to the final game) and two incandescent stars forming a lasting rivalry was like a match to dry grass. It was symbolic even beyond that: Earvin Johnson’s Michigan State Spartans were “Magic”, and Larry Bird’s Indiana State Sycamores were led by the “Hick from French Lick”. The David vs. Goliath subplot became an enduring pillar of the March Madness pantheon.

2. Danny Ainge goes coast-to-coast (1981): The game-winning deep shot happens often, and involves several players facilitating the final outcome. One player taking the ball from end-line to end-line is very rare, and Ainge did it in legendary fashion to help Brigham Young defeat Notre Dame. It happened again when UCLA’s Tyus Edney knocked Missouri out in 1995, but Ainge defined the genre.

3. Jordan and Worthy (1982): Two of the NBA game’s all-time greats got their start in short, short (indecently short, really) pants. Michael Jordan hit one of his trademark floating-on-air jumpers to give North Carolina the lead over Georgetown, but the Hoyas had time left on the clock. As G’town raced downcourt to set up a potential game-winning shot, Fred Brown accidentally passed the ball to his opponent, James Worthy, who dribbled out the clock and set off a massive celebration for Dean Smith’s Tar Heels.

4. Valvano’s Wolfpack shock Phi Slama Jamma (1983): You may have seen video of Jim Valvano racing around the court, searching for someone to hug. The play that precipitated his joyous scramble was no less iconic. Dereck Wittenburg launched a deep, deep desperation shot that fell well short of the mark, seemingly ending N.C. State’s hopes of upsetting the Houston Cougars of Clyde Drexler and Hakeem Olajuwan. But alert teammate Lorenzo Charles caught the airball and dunked it with microseconds to spare, sparking one of the most memorable title-game upsets of all time.

5. Keith Smart catches fire (1987): Indiana appeared to be out of the running for the national title, with Syracuse and the deadly zone sapping the Hoosiers’ collective energy. Then Keith Smart took it upon himself to be the zone-buster, hitting shot after shot and scoring twelve of his team’s final fifteen points to bring about the comeback. This is about moments, so we’ll focus on the final 16-footer that dropped in with one second left on the clock – that one came off of Smart’s fingertips as well.

6. Bo Kimble’s lefty free throws (1990): Loyola Marymount attracted positive attention before the tournament began, playing a run-and-gun style that routinely resulted in NBA-like scores. Then came the sad moment, when star forward Hank Gathers collapsed and died during the WCC tournament. His teammate Bo Kimble – a natural righty – shot his first free throw of each game thereafter with his left hand in tribute to his fallen friend. Kimble got his team all the way to the Elite Eight that season, and made every one of his four tribute lefty free-throws. Mention Kimble or Gathers to anyone who saw it, and you’ll see the goose bumps rise.

7. Laettner’s shot (1992): Honestly, if it were just the shot that Laettner dropped in to take Duke past Kentucky, it would have been a pretty big deal. What makes it legendary is the dribble. Laettner was the epitome of cool under fire, gathering in Grant Hill’s three-quarter-court football pass with two seconds left on the clock and taking a moment to bounce it off the court before turning and drilling college basketball’s most iconic game-winning shot.

8. Bryce Drew (1998): Every crazy three-pointer from an underdog to knock out a power-conference foe will forever be compared to this shot. Much like Laettner’s effort, this one involved a long, long pass from under the opposite basket (the one that belonged to Ole Miss), but this one went down the wing to Valparaiso shooting star Bryce Drew, who calmly put it up and watched it fall in, just moments before being buried beneath ecstatic teammates. The shots of his father, good-guy coach Homer Drew, smiling with pride on the sidelines give this one a little extra glow.

9. Mario’s Miracle (2008): Again, last second shots happen often in basketball. What makes this one – a game-tying shot – amazing is that it came on a broken play. Kansas was trailing Memphis with two seconds left, and entrusted the ball to sophomore point guard Sherron Collins. Collins was to hand the ball off to the team’s best shooter, Mario Chalmers. Instead, he stumbled and flipped the ball backward to Chalmers, who was double-covered. Not only did Chalmers catch the ball cleanly, but he splashed it to force overtime, which led to a title for the Jayhawks.

10. Butler’s near-miss (2010): The Butler Bulldogs overcame massive odds to reach the Final Four, which happened to be held in their hometown of Indianapolis. They nearly walked the NCAA trophy down Broad Ripple Street, but Gordon Hayward’s last-second heave was just off the mark, and Duke escaped with yet another bauble to stuff in a corner at Cameron Indoor Stadium. It was a miss, but the shot itself was so full of possibilities and hope that it will never be forgotten. At least until a similar one goes in.

Bonus Section

11. Chris Webber’s phantom time-out (1993): There are a couple of reasons the NCAA site won’t show you this one. First, I’d imagine they don’t want to define their game by an epic fail. Second, and more meaningful, they disassociated themselves from Webber’s achievements (and errors) after an investigation into booster payments that stripped Michigan of several wins and individual honors. The fact is, Webber was an amazing player, and his exploits on the court did happen, no matter who tries to tell us they didn’t count. Sadly, Webber will always be best remembered for losing his head in the big game against North Carolina (never mind that he traveled long before he made that second mistake).

12. Eric Maynor and The Dagger (2007): And so began the national love affair with VCU basketball. Rams point guard Eric Maynor, little-known on the national stage prior to this first-round game, booted the Duke Blue Devils with a cold-blooded stroll down the court to paydirt.

This play is partly famous because the victim of Maynor’s knife attack was much-hated-upon Duke, but also because broadcaster Ian Eagle spontaneously named it “The Dagger”. If your play has a name, it’s part of history.

Here’s hoping 2013 gives us a couple more mind-bending moments we can tell our grandkids about.

Eric Angevine is the editor of Storming the Floor. He tweets @stfhoops.

VIDEO: Kentucky fan makes a hype video

NASHVILLE, TN - MARCH 11:  Isaiah Briscoe #13 of the Kentucky Wildcats celebrates in the game against the Alabama Crimson Tide during the quarterfinals of the SEC Basketball Tournament at Bridgestone Arena on March 11, 2016 in Nashville, Tennessee.  (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
(Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
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Memorial Day weekend is typically a slow time for sports news, so over the weekend, the CBT crew has been discussing fan videos and songs.

If you’re not familiar, a lot of programs have fans that are so passionate, that they create something as tribute for their programs. This stuff tends to happen in the offseason.

Take this 12-minute video a Kentucky fan made that was posted by Kentucky Sports Radio’s Drew Franklin yesterday as an example:

Twelve minutes is a staggering amount for a video like this, but it captures multiple seasons and even goes into the future.

Not bad.

But it definitely doesn’t beat this Villanova song released by MRG after the Wildcats’ NCAA tournament run.

So now that we’ve seen the baseline for videos and songs, do any other fanbases have anything better in them this summer? There’s still a lot of time until college hoops begins next season and there are plenty of fans who can jump in with a submission.

Throughout the summer, we’ll post the best fan submissions on CBT (as long as they’re clean and original) and see which group of fans has the best at the end of it all.

Canisius finds a new head coach following Jim Baron’s retirement

Canisius head coach Jim Baron talks with players during college basketball practice in Buffalo, N.Y., Tuesday, March 5, 2013. One year after Baron was fired at Rhode Island, the coach and his point guard son, Billy, have teamed up at Canisius to breath new life into a struggling program. (AP Photo/David Duprey)
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Canisius has found a new head coach following the retirement of Jim Baron, as the Griffins have hired former Buffalo coach Reggie Witherspoon, according to a report from Mark Gaughan of the Buffalo News.

The 55-year-old Witherspoon was formerly the head coach at Buffalo from December 1999 until after the 2012-13 season and was recently an assistant coach at Alabama and Chattanooga the past two seasons.

During his time at Buffalo, Witherspoon went 197-225 while making four postseason appearances. He takes over a Canisius program that went 14-19 and 8-12 in the MAAC last season.

As a Buffalo native who has coached in the area as a high school, junior college and Division I head coach, Witherspoon should be familiar with the landscape of being a basketball coach in that city. It’s hard to say if Witherspoon can lead Canisius to prominence at this stage in his career, but he’ll certainly know the area enough to hit the ground running.

UNC’s Roy Williams recovering from knee replacement surgery

JACKSONVILLE, FL - MARCH 19:  Head coach Roy Williams of the North Carolina Tar Heels reacts on the bench against the Harvard Crimson during the second round of the 2015 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena on March 19, 2015 in Jacksonville, Florida.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
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CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) North Carolina Hall of Fame men’s basketball coach Roy Williams is recovering from knee replacement surgery.

In an email Friday, athletics spokesman Steve Kirschner says Williams is “resting comfortably” after the procedure on his right knee performed by Dr. Walt Beaver in Charlotte. Kirschner says there’s no exact recovery timetable but Williams is expected to be on the road for July recruiting “as usual.”

The 65-year-old Williams had procedures on both knees last year but experienced discomfort during the season as the Tar Heels won the Atlantic Coast Conference regular-season and tournament titles before losing in the NCAA title game on a last-second shot to Villanova.

A week later, Williams said he was considering surgery options for a “bone-on-bone” condition and noted: “I’ve got to be able to move around.”

Utah to play rival BYU in basketball again in 2017

SALT LAKE CITY, UT - DECEMBER 2: Nate Austin #33 of the Brigham Young Cougars and Jakob Poeltl #42 of the Utah Utes try for the ball in the second half of the Utes 83-75 win at the Jon M. Huntsman Center on December 2, 2015 in Salt Lake City, Utah. (Photo by Gene Sweeney Jr/Getty Images)
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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) Utah will play rival BYU in basketball again in 2017 in a game that will end a “cooling off period” Utah demanded due to events at recent games.

Utah said in a news release Thursday that the two schools have agreed to play in 2017 at BYU. The school’s athletic directors are talking about scheduling future games.

The decision to cancel the rivalry upset BYU and ignited a controversy that lit up sports talk radio and triggered legislators to order a state audit of Utah athletics. The game had been played every year since 1909 except for during World War II.

Utah coach Larry Krystkowiak said in January that the rivalry had become a “venomous and toxic environment.” BYU guard Nick Emery was ejected from December’s game for punching Utah’s Brandon Taylor.

Looking Forward: Defense will help Arizona sort out loaded rotation

PROVIDENCE, RI - MARCH 17:  Head coach Sean Miller of the Arizona Wildcats reacts in the first half against the Wichita State Shockers during the first round of the 2016 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Dunkin' Donuts Center on March 17, 2016 in Providence, Rhode Island.  (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)
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The NBA Draft’s Early Entry Deadline has come and gone. Just about every elite recruit has decided where they will be playing their college ball next season. The coaching carousel, which ended up spinning a bit faster than initially expected, has come to a close for all of the major programs. 

In other words, by now, we have a pretty good feel for what college basketball is going to look like during the 2016-17 season. With that in mind let’s take a look at Arizona, an elite program that reloads with designs on erasing the bad memories of last year’s first round NCAA tournament exit. 

After going on a two-year run in which they went 67-9, won two Pac-12 regular season titles and made two Elite Eight appearances, Arizona took a step back in 2015-16. Sean Miller’s Wildcats saw their grip on the Pac-12 loosen, with Oregon taking advantage, and their NCAA tournament stay was a short one thanks to a tough Wichita State team. Many programs would sign up for a season that included 25 wins despite injuries to freshmen Ray Smith (torn ACL) and Allonzo Trier (broken hand).

But Arizona isn’t your “run of the mill” program, which is a testament not only to what the retired Lute Olson accomplished during his time in Tucson but to what Sean Miller’s managed to do as well. Since his arrival Miller’s pumped new life into the program, with Arizona racking up highly regarded recruiting classes and the wins to match.

All that’s missing from his time at Arizona is a trip to the Final Four, an accomplishment Arizona hasn’t been able to boast since 2001. And after last year’s disappointing finish, Arizona’s work on the recruiting trail in the spring has them in a position where they can get that done. There’s talent, depth and versatility on the roster heading into the 2016-17 season, with some key returnees being joined by one of the nation’s best recruiting classes.

And with that will come an important question for the Wildcats: how will they sort everything out from a rotation standpoint?

Competition within the ranks is hardly a bad thing; “as iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another.” The same can be said for versatility, which will be another positive trait for Arizona in 2016-17. At first glance the roster has just two players seemingly locked into one specific position: Parker Jackson-Cartwright at point guard and Dusan Ristic at center. Outside of that, Arizona boasts a host of players capable of filling multiple spots based upon the desires of their head coach and the flow of the game.

The front court includes a mobile 7-footer in sophomore Chance Comanche, who managed to earn more consistent appearances down the stretch thanks to his activity on the defensive end of the floor. Newcomers in Lauri Markkanen and Keanu Pinder who can fill multiple roles in the front court, with Markannen’s ability to step out and hit perimeter shots being especially key, and the same can be said of the talented Smith provided there are no lingering effects from his second ACL tear in as many years.

With the injury and the time away from live action Smith will likely have some rust to shake off, but this is something Arizona can work through given their depth. There’s role versatility and this sets up to be a more mobile group defensively as well, which can only help the Wildcats moving forward.

The bigger area for Arizona from an options standpoint is on the perimeter, as they’re loaded with established returnees and high-caliber newcomers. And with the players available, how everything shakes out with regards to roles and minutes that come with them will be very interesting to watch. Trier’s back after a successful freshman season in which he averaged 14.6 points per game and shot 46.6 percent from the field, and with his ability to attack defenses off the dribble he’ll figure prominently in the Arizona rotation again in 2016-17.

Also returning are Kadeem Allen and Parker Jackson-Cartwright, who shared the point guard duties with Allen getting the starting nod thanks in large part to his ability on the defensive end of the floor. Losing Gabe York, who was second on the team in scoring and Arizona’s best three-point shooter a season ago, can’t be overlooked. But with the additions to the program, Arizona can more than account for the production lost there.

Last year Trier was the Wildcat best capable of attacking defenses off the bounce, but even with the relative “lack” of such options Arizona still managed to average 80 points per game and shoot 48 percent from the field. Things will be a bit different in 2016-17, thanks to factors such as the loss of York and Ryan Anderson and the fact that they’ll have more players capable of breaking down opponents off the dribble. Freshmen Kobi Simmons, Rawle Alkins and Terrance Ferguson can all create shots via dribble penetration, with Ferguson also being one of the top shooters in the class of 2016.

CHICAGO, IL - MARCH 30: Terrance Ferguson #6 of the East  team goes up for a dunk against the West team during the 2016 McDonalds's All American Game on March 30, 2016 at the United Center in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by David Banks/Getty Images)
Terrance Ferguson (Photo by David Banks/Getty Images)

But could this turn out to be a case of having too much of a good thing? While considered a point guard, Simmons proved to be better at getting himself looks than doing so for others, and Alkins was also considered to be a “ball dominant” guard at the high school level. How will that change at the college level, and how will the pieces fit together within Arizona’s rotation?

These are important questions to address, and how Arizona can do that is on the defensive end of the floor.

After two straight seasons of producing defenses that ranked in the top three in the country in adjusted defensive efficiency per Ken Pomeroy’s numbers (first in 2014, third in 2015), Arizona was ranked 41st in that category last season. After two consecutive seasons of limiting teams to less than 40 percent shooting from the field, Arizona allowed teams to shoot 41.3 percent in 2015-16. Also of concern was the turnover department, with teams committing an average of just 11.4 per game against the Wildcats last season.

By comparison, those two Elite Eight teams managed to force an average of 13.8 turnovers per game in 2013-14 and 12.4 per contest in 2014-15. The pack line defense isn’t one that people would necessarily categorize as a “pressure” system, but one of the strengths for Arizona during those two Elite Eight runs was having athletic options on the wings who can make life difficult for passers and the players looking to receive those passes. That wasn’t the case last season, but it may not be a problem in 2016-17 thanks to the roster additions.

Ferguson’s athleticism is noted above, and he’s also a long-armed player who more than holds his own defensively. Alkins also has the physical tools needed to cause trouble on the wing, which will give Arizona a good shot at playing defense at the level we grew accustomed to seeing them reach.

Physical tools aside, there’s always the “carrot” of playing time to dangle in front of the players. When discussing the adjustment process for freshmen many rush to the offensive end, and that’s understandable to a certain extent. But the biggest adjustment comes on the other end of the floor, and being able to prove that you can defend your position and carry out the team’s defensive game plan.

Arizona will certainly have offensive talent across the board next season. But the reason why they can rebound from last season and possibly reach the Final Four is the fact that some of that talent will make a difference defensively as well.