Syracuse v Georgetown

Speculation about Jim Boeheim’s retirement isn’t going to go away


When talk of Jim Boeheim retiring comes up, the evidence used to prove that he’s considering it is completely circumstantial. Boeheim himself, as recently as Saturday, emphatically stated, in no uncertain terms, that he hasn’t thought about retiring.

“There’s nothing to talk about because I haven’t given a thought to it. I’ve never … ever … ever … ever … said anything about retiring,” Boeheim told Bud Poliquin of on Saturday afternoon, after Syracuse lost to Georgetown at the Verizon Center. “I’ve said the same thing all year, and all last year: I just want to get through the year. I have no plans to retire. Could I retire? Anything can happen, but I have no thoughts right now. If I was thinking about it a little bit, I’d say, ‘Well, I’m thinking about it.’ But I’m not. That golf line was just a joke. The season’s almost over. In a couple of weeks, I’ll go play golf. But not permanently. I don’t like golf that much.”

The reason that Poliquin had to track down Boeheim and ask him about his retirement was the result of something he said in the postgame press conference.

“I’m pretty much ready to go play golf someplace,” he said. “If I was 40 years old, I would be real upset. I’m not 40 years old. That should be obvious.” This came after the 68-year old Boeheim made a long, rambling and wistful statement in remembrance of the Big East and the Syracuse rivalry with Georgetown. As I wrote on Saturday, it was easy to tell that Boeheim was looking back fondly on an era that was coming to a close, but whether the era in question was Syracuse’s time in the Big East or his tenure as the coach of the Orange was unclear.

What we do know is that Boeheim isn’t getting any younger. Syracuse is leaving the conference that he helped build and breaking up a rivalry that he’s been a central figure in for 33 years. Retiring and sending Orange basketball into their new era with a new coach, leaving as the only man to have the title of ‘Syracuse head coach’ in Big East history, would put a nice little bow on his career.

Boeheim’s made it clear the move to the ACC doesn’t necessarily excite him, making it perfectly clear he doesn’t think Greensboro, NC, compares to New York City and that he doesn’t look forward to having to eat at a Denny’s on trips to Clemson. Throw in the fact that his hand-picked successor is interviewing for coaching gigs on the other side of the country, and it just fits.

So no, Boeheim hasn’t made any comments about retiring. The ones that can be interpreted as a veiled hint at his future can also be read as another example of a grumpy old curmudgeon saying the things grumpy old curmudgeons say.

But don’t expect the speculation to go away, not when Boeheim’s retirement this offseason would be a poetic way to end his story.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Stanford loses key veteran guard to stress fracture

Marcus Allen
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Stanford guard Marcus Allen will be out indefinitely after suffering a stress fracture in his right foot, the school announced on Monday evening.

“We want to make sure Marcus is fully healthy before returning to the court,” Stanford coach Johnny Dawkins said in a statement. “Marcus played at a high level during our summer exhibition competition in Italy, where he was one of our leading scorers. We will certainly miss him as we continue to prepare for the season, but we are fortunate that this happened now and he will be back before he knows it.”

The loss of Allen is a potentially brutal blow in an already-thin back court. The 6-foot-3 Allen started 23 games as a sophomore last season, averaging 6.4 points and 3.5 boards. But he averaged 11.4 points and 5.4 boards as the Cardinal made a run to the NIT championship and looked poised to be able to replace the departed Chasson Randle’s production this year.

What’s worse is that without Allen, Stanford does not return a single player in their back court that averaged more than 11.5 minutes. Sophomore Robert Cartwright looks poised to step into the starting point guard role, but neither Dorian Pickens nor Christian Sanders looked like they were ready for that kind of role in the Pac-12 last season. Dawkins does return Malcolm Allen, Marcus’ twin brother, who sat out last season with a broken wrist.

The good news is that Stanford’s front court is strong enough to carry the Cardinal until Marcus is healthy. Rosco Allen, Reid Travis and Michael Humphrey will be able to hold their own against any front line in the Pac-12, while Grant Verhoeven and freshman Josh Sharma will provide adequate depth.

Utah lands top-75 center Jayce Johnson

Larry Krystkowiak
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Utah picked up its center of the future on Monday as four-star center Jayce Johnson pledged to the Runnin’ Utes, a source confirmed to The 7-foot Johnson recently cut his list to Cal, Colorado and Utah with the possibility of reclassifying to the Class of 2015.

Regarded as the No. 67 overall prospect in the Class of 2016, Johnson will look to attend Utah in December as a walk-on who will redshirt. While Johnson likely won’t play this season, he does give head coach Larry Krystkowiak another big man to use in practice to go against sophomore center Jakob Poeltl. A solid long-term prospect, Johnson has a good frame to add weight and he’s also skilled finishing with both hands. Utah now has its replacement for Poeltl if he opts to leave for the NBA after the season and he gets an extra semester to work with the program.

Johnson is coming off of his official visit to Utah this weekend as he joins junior college guard Jojo Zamora in the Class of 2016.