Trey Burke leads No. 4 Michigan past No. 9 Michigan State


No. 4 Michigan ranks among the best shooting teams in America, and when they’re on from the perimeter the Wolverines are a very tough team to beat. So how did John Beilein’s team beat No. 9 Michigan State 58-57 despite shooting 0-of-12 from beyond the arc?

Trey Burke.

The sophomore point guard was the difference for the Wolverines (24-5, 11-5 Big Ten), scoring 21 points, dishing out eight assists (two turnovers) and racking up five steals. And dunk after picking Keith Appling’s pocket with just over 20 seconds remaining gave Michigan a 58-56 lead.

The Spartans (22-7, 11-5) failed to get off a final shot as Burke picked up another steal, giving the Wolverines a much-needed win following their loss at Penn State on Wednesday. Burke scored 18 points in the 84-78 loss to the Nittany Lions but he finished with as many turnovers (six) as assists.

As Burke goes so goes Michigan, as evidenced by his teammates occasionally leaning too heavily on the sophomore to make something happen offensively. Tim Hardaway Jr. shot 3-of-12 from the field and Mitch McGary was the only other Wolverine to reach double figures, scoring 11 points off the bench. Michigan needed Burke to deliver and he did just that, making plays on both ends of the floor to get the Wolverines over the finish line.

The Wolverines were also out-rebounded 44-29, with Michigan State grabbing 19 offensive rebounds (16 second chance points). But Michigan State also turned the ball over 18 times, which prevented them from taking advantage of Michigan’s poor perimeter shooting.

Is Burke the best player in college basketball? That’s certainly up for debate, with players such as Georgetown’s Otto Porter Jr., Indiana’s Victor Oladipo and Creighton’s Doug McDermott among the players also in the discussion.

But Burke certainly has a case, and his impact on Sunday’s outcome is the latest example of just how important he is to Michigan.

Raphielle also writes for the NBE Basketball Report and can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

Sister Jean: “I don’t care that you broke my bracket.”

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As Missouri Valley Conference player of the year Clayton Custer came off the floor after Loyola earned its spot in the Elite Eight after beating Nevada, he had to make a quick apology.

He had to tell the Ramblers’ star fan Sister Jean he was sorry. She, of course, had picked Loyola’s Cinderella run to end in the Sweet 16 in her bracket before the start of the tournament.

The apology was quickly accepted.

“I said I don’t care that you broke my bracket,” Sister Jean said. “I’m ready for the next one.

“For a nice little school like ours, we are just so proud of them.”

Michigan’s hot shooting carries them into the Elite Eight past Texas A&M

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Historically known as a team that lived and died with the three-ball, No. 3-seed Michigan had spent the first weekend of the NCAA tournament proving history wrong.

In an ugly game in their opener against Montana, the Wolverines shot 5-for-16 from three while turning the ball over 14 times and managing a measly 61 points. Against Houston in the second round, Michigan shot 8-for-30 from beyond the arc, with one of those threes coming courtesy of Jordan Poole at the buzzer, sending the Wolverines into the Sweet 16 with a 64-63 win.

Put another way, Michigan looked the part of the defensive grinder that they turned into this season.

Against No. 7-seed Texas A&M in the Sweet 16, however, the Wolverines turned into the Golden State Warriors.

Michigan bested the number of three that they had made in the tournament to date, hitting 14-of-24 bombs while shooting 62 percent from the floor in a 99-72 win over an Aggies team that had finally, for the first time since November, looked the part of the SEC title contender that they have the talent to be.

No. 11 Loyola moves on to Elite Eight after beating No. 7 Nevada

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Loyola is in the Elite Eight.

The Ramblers’ dream run through March continued Thursday as they knocked off No. 7 Nevada, 69-68, in South Region semifinal in Atlanta.

Loyola, an 11th seed making its first NCAA tournament appearance since 1985, will play the winner of Kansas State and Kentucky on Sunday for a chance to return to the Final Four for the first time since it won the 1963 national championship.

Marques Townes hit a 3-pointer with under 10 seconds to play to put the Ramblers up four and put the game all but out of reach for Nevada. Townes finished with 18 points while Clayton Custer had 15.  Loyola shot 55.8 percent from the floor for the game.

The Wolf Pack’s Caleb Martin had 21 points while Jordan Caroline had 19. Nevada shot 41.4 percent from the floor.

Nevada looked like it may overwhelm Loyola early as it built a 12-point lead less than seven minutes into the game. The Ramblers, though, struck back by keeping the Wolf Pack off the board for nearly the last 8 minutes of the first half to take a four-point lead into the break.

The strong play considered on the other side of halftime for Loyola, which astonishingly made its first 13 shots of the second half. Still, despite the perfect start, the Ramblers only briefly took a double-digit lead before Nevada sliced it back down below 10.

Loyola’s inability to build a substantial lead came back to bite it as Nevada, the comeback kids of this tournament, mounted its attack on the deficit and had it erased before the under-four timeout, setting up the final frantic minutes of a battle for a spot in the Elite Eight that the Ramblers claimed thanks to Townes’ late triple.

2018 March Madness: Fans in Times Square pick fake teams in Sweet 16 predictions

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NBC Sports went into Times Square this week to ask basketball fans for their Sweet 16 picks.

The only problem?

The teams in the games are not actually playing in the NCAA Tournament.

They aren’t even actually teams.

Hilarity ensued.

Miami’s Bruce Brown declares for draft without an agent

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Bruce Brown wants to hear what the NBA has to say.

The Miami sophomore has declared for the draft but will not hire an agent, the school announced Thursday.

The 6-foot-5 guard averaged 11.4 points, 7.5 rebounds and 4.0 assists per game during his second season with the Hurricanes. He did, though, see his shooting numbers take a tumble compared to his freshman season with his field goal percentage down from 45.9 to 41.5 percent and his 3-point shoot go from 34.7 to 26.7 percent. There’s also the matter of a foot injury that required surgery and kept him off the floor for the ‘Canes’ last 12 games.

By declaring for the draft, Brown can get in front of NBA teams, who will likely take a very close look at his shooting mechanics after that sophomore season downturn. It will also be an opportunity for him to build up his reputation in the professional ranks after spending much of his sophomore season injured.