Mike Aresco

Report: With much to be worked out Big East hasn’t split yet

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With the reports that came out on Thursday it seemed as if the splitting of the Big East Conference would be both quick and amicable. The seven schools previously dubbed the “Catholic 7” would get to leave at the end of the current academic year, and they would get the rights to the name as well.

But with the conference presidents meeting in Atlanta this weekend there’s a lot of work to be done in the move towards the creation of two separate leagues. That means the reports of a split being agreed to on Thursday were premature.

According to Mark Blaudschun the Big East presidents have yet to agree on anything, be it the financial terms of such a move or how to make the actual logistics work in time for the “new” Big East to cash in on a television deal proposed by Fox Sports.

People went into the meeting in Atlanta on Friday morning with an attitude of maybe we can do this, maybe we won’t–at least right away. Let’s look at the dollar figures, which are in the millions of dollars range.

All of this will eventually be worked  out. The Catholic 7 will leave in July. They will take the Big East name.

But….it might cost them more than they thought. And the word amicable is rapidly fading from the use of descriptions regarding the talks.

The devil is in the details as they say, and there are lots of details that must be worked out on both sides.

Blaudschun’s report follows one from CSNPhilly.com on Thursday night in which Temple athletic director Bill Bradshaw denied that any agreement had been made between the two “entities.”

When asked to respond, Bradshaw said he had “no comment” because “no decisions have been made.” He referred to Thursday’s multiple reports as “rumors” and said he had “no idea where [they] came from.”

Fox Sports, which needs new inventory for the new all-sports channel that it’s creating (formerly the Speed Channel), helped grease the skids for a split with presidents of the seven schools all too willing to go along with given how much more money they stand to make.

On Thursday afternoon many, myself included, were of the belief that the Big East split could be unlike other moves in conference realignment, with administrators avoiding the catty behavior and lawsuits that can occur more often than not.

That could still happen, but given the amount of money at stake there’s the possibility (hell, likelihood) that some lawyers will be the ones who end up cashing in as well.

Raphielle also writes for the NBE Basketball Report and can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

Sun Belt approves new scheduling format

Sun Belt Conference
Sun Belt Conference
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With an 11-member setup the Sun Belt Conference has played a 20-game conference schedule the last couple of years, which may be seen as a positive when it comes to determining the regular season champion (home-and-home between every team). But for a conference that spans from North Carolina (Appalachian State) to Texas (UT-Arlington, Texas State) travel was far from easy in that setup.

And with Coastal Carolina joining next season, it was clear that the league needed to do something with its scheduling.

Thursday the Sun Belt members approved an 18-game conference schedule, which will begin with the 2016-17 season when the league consists of 12 members. Included in the agreement is the assignment of travel partners (similar to setups in the Pac-12 and Ivy League), and teams playing no more than three consecutive conference games on the road.

Schools will also be guaranteed at least five weekend home games during conference play, and there will be no more weekends in which teams play conference games both home and away (thus cutting down on travel). Obviously with the addition of Coastal Carolina the Sun Belt needed to make some changes in their scheduling, and this week the conference made the moves they needed to make.

Former Wichita State assistant returns as a consultant

Chris Jans, Gregg Marshall
Associated Press
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Prior to a one-year stint as the head coach coach at Bowling Green that came to an end in early April as a result of an incident at a Bowling Green restaurant, Chris Jans was a member of Gregg Marshall’s coaching staff at Wichita State from 2007-14. During those seven seasons Jans was a key figure as the Shockers made the progression to a respected national power.

Jans is back in Wichita, with Paul Suellentrop of the Wichita Eagle reporting Thursday that he’s serving as a consultant to the program. Jans’ consulting agreement runs for 45 days, which the school can renew, and he’ll be paid $10,000 for the work. While Jans isn’t allowed to do any coaching, he can watch practices and provide Marshall and the coaching staff with his observations.

“He will be able to consult with the coaching staff, only on what he observes in practice,” said Darron Boatright, WSU deputy athletics director. “By NCAA rule, a consultant is not allowed to have communication with student-athletes … not about basketball-related activities or performance.”

While Jans (who according to the story has served in a similar role for another school) can’t do any coaching in this role, his return does give Marshall another trusted voice to call upon when needed. Wichita State bid farewell to an assistant coach this spring with Steve Forbes being hired as the head coach at East Tennessee State, with his position being filled by former Sunrise Christian Academy coach Kyle Lindsted.

h/t ShockerHoops.net