Laurence Bowers, Erik Murphy

Florida’s poor track record in close games is worrisome


With Missouri leading 61-60 and less than 20 seconds left on the clock, No. 5 Florida had the ball with a chance to pick up a win over the second-best team in the SEC on the road.

The question that rippled through twitter at that exact moment: “Who does Florida give the ball to here?”

And it’s a legitimate concern for the Gators. Who is their go-to guy? Who gets the ball for them in the clutch? Who can they trust to get a good shot in a big moment and make it? Because what they ended up with on Tuesday night was Kenny Boynton pulling up for three from about 23 feet with a good seven seconds left on the clock. He missed, and Missouri won, 63-60.

This came one possession after Boynton attempted another three with a minute left in the game and Florida again down one. He missed that, too.

The irony here?

The shot that Florida got — Rosario from deep in the corner — after Keion Bell’s free throws 3.1 seconds was better than either look Boynton had. That came after Florida went the length of the floor without having a timeout to draw up a play.

Now, frankly, I don’t have a huge issue with the Gators affinity for the three-ball. They took 54 shots tonight, and 33 of them were from beyond the arc. On the season, 41.3% of their shots have come from distance. It’s who they are. It’s who they’ve been. It got them to the Elite 8 last season, and this year’s team is built around their stout, versatile defense. I can deal with it.

The problem I have is with the way Florida executes down the stretch in close games.

Florida has played three close games this season. They’ve lost all three. Every other time they’ve stepped foot on the floor, it’s been a blowout — and with the exception of one fateful half at Arkansas, it’s been the Gators that have been doing the dominating.

But those three close games are the ones that stick out. Florida blew a six-point lead in the final minute at Arizona back in November. They blew a 13 point second half lead Tuesday night. I don’t mean to bring up bad memories, but the Gators also blew an 11 point lead in the final eight minutes against Louisville in last year’s NCAA tournament.

And unless you count home wins over Missouri (without Laurence Bowers), Ole Miss or Kentucky (in the game Nerlens Noel got injured) as quality wins, Florida hasn’t really beaten anyone relevant since November 29th, when they steamrolled Marquette at home.

There’s no questioning Florida’s ability to defend, and there’s no denying just how good they have played for the overwhelming majority of the season.

But for a defensive-minded team — especially one that relies as heavily as the Gators do on the three-ball — struggling to close out close games is a problem.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Texas lands commitment from top 100 center

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James Banks announced on Thursday that he has committed to Texas, joining Jacob Young in Shaka Smart’s first recruiting class as the head coach of the Longhorns.

Banks is an interesting prospect. A 6-foot-10 center from Georgia, Banks is a still-developing prospect that was recruited more on his potential than his immediate ability.

“James Banks emerged as a good low post prospect this spring and summer,” NBC Recruiting Analyst Scott Phillips said. “With a good set of hands, some offensive potential and a frame that can add weight, Banks is a nice upside grab for Texas.”

He’s probably a few years away from having a major impact in the Big 12, but he may not have that much time to develop. Cameron Ridley, Prince Ibeh and Conner Lamert all graduate after this season, meaning that Banks is going to have to contribute immediately when he sets foot on the Austin campus for the 2016-17 season.

Texas has three commitments in the Class of 2015. Smart convinced Kerwin Roach and Eric Davis to remain committed to the program when he took over for Rick Barnes while he landed a commitment from Tevin Mack, who pledged to Smart when he was at VCU.

Memphis guard could miss season with shoulder injury

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Memphis just cannot catch a break.


It’s to the point where I almost feel bad for Josh Pastner.

Today, reported that Kedren Johnson, a 6-foot-4 point guard that was on track towards being an all-SEC point guard at Vanderbilt, could end up missing the season due to a shoulder injury. If he can handle the pain he can avoid surgery and play with the injury, but at the very least, Johnson is going to be less than his best.

Johnson averaged 6.7 points and 2.7 assists last season for the Tigers. He sat out 2013-14 after leaving Vanderbilt and entered last season incredibly out of shape. There was hope that he would be able to make a bigger impact this season and help fill the void at the point guard spot.

This news comes on the heels of Memphis finding out that Jaylen Fisher is heading to UNLV. Who’s Jaylen Fisher? Well, he’s a point guard and top 40 recruit from Memphis that was Pastner’s No. 1 recruiting target that opted to leave the city for his college hoops instead of play for the Tigers.

That’s a bad sign, but not quite as bad as Memphis losing star center Austin Nichols — another local kid — to a transfer over the summer. Nichols transferred to Virginia.