Nonprofit group sues NCAA over rule barring of felons from coaching AAU teams


In recent years the NCAA has attempted to take some steps in cleaning up grassroots basketball (at least on its end).

Prohibiting college coaches from attending spring and summer events that aren’t sanctioned by the NCAA during open recruiting periods, and requiring participating teams to be registered with the NCAA in order to compete in such events are two examples of the new legislation.

Another rule that was put in place was the decision to ban convicted felons from coaching sanctioned grassroots basketball teams. But after Dominic Hardie was denied the certification needed due to a nonviolent drug conviction that occurred more than a decade ago, a nonprofit group filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in San Diego on Wednesday.

Hardie filed suit in hopes of being able to coach his girls basketball team in San Diego, and the suit claims that the rule violates the Civil Rights Act and “disproportionately affects minority coaches.”

Hardie is seeking a preliminary injunction to allow him to coach in an upcoming game in San Diego. His legal team, which includes the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, said the new policy has a chilling effect on minority coaches.

The original NCAA policy was to allow convicted felons who were seven or more years removed from their conviction to coach, but the governing body changed the rule in 2011. Those sanctioned events are the only opportunities in which players can play in front of college coaches during the spring and summer months, a timeframe that has become increasingly important in the recruiting world.

However despite the lawsuit the NCAA seems to be confident that its rule will be upheld, as noted by NCAA VP of communications Bob Williams in a statement released on Wednesday.

“Our policy has been unsuccessfully challenged in court previously. We continue to believe convicted felons should not have access to youth at events where NCAA coaches are participating, and we will vigorously defend this lawsuit.”

Raphielle also writes for the NBE Basketball Report and can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej

Kennesaw State misses dunk, yet still makes shot

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Jordan Jones will not score a more impressive bucket all season. Probably for the rest of his career. And that’s not being harsh. That’s just how ridiculous the three-second clip below is.

The Kennesaw State junior forward went up for a windmill dunk, back-ironed the attempt with so much force — and at the right angle — that it went in a different hoop along the sideline.

The 6-foot-8 Jones averaged 3.5 points and 3.4 rebounds per game for the Owls last season.

Report: One-and-done rule to stay in new CBA

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 23:  Ben Simmons poses with Commissioner Adam Silver after being drafted first overall by the Philadelphia 76ers in the first round of the 2016 NBA Draft at the Barclays Center on June 23, 2016 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
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Last month, the NBA and NBA Players’ Association reportedly began discussing a new collective bargaining agreement.

On Thursday night, Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports’ The Vertical reported that a “deal was within sight” as the two sides have moved closer and closer in negotiations.

One of the consistent issues over the years has been one-and-done rule, which was instituted during the 2005 negotiations, requiring a prospective draftee to be 19 years old and be one year removed from his high school graduating class.

According to Wojnarowski, the one-and-done rule will remain intact in the new CBA agreement.

Since taking over the league in February 2014, NBA commissioner Adam Silver had made increasing the age limit to 20 years old a priority. So, this reported news is clearly a comprise on the side of himself and the owners; a group of 30 executives who would rather have another year of scouting and information on a prospect rather than taking a potential gamble on a teenager in the first round.

For college basketball, things remain relatively the same. Some players will go for the money, whether pundits like it or not — remember, every early entry should be viewed on a case-by-case basis. But recent rule changes have benefited college players. Pushing the deadline back saw tons and tons of players declare for the 2016 NBA Draft, which left many coaches in precautions situations as they sweated over what next year’s roster was going to look like. But it was beneficial to the players, providing them a thorough process of interviews, workouts and, in some cases, a spot in the NBA Draft Combine. This gave them the resources and insight to make informed opinions about their future, whether that is finding out that their stock is likely at its highest, or getting the proper critiques on what they need to improve upon before turning pro.

The NBA and NBPA each have the ability to opt out of the current collective bargaining agreement on Dec. 15, but Wojnarowski reports that a deal is expected to be in place by then.

Eustachy to remain with Colorado St. through 2020-21 season

LAS VEGAS, NV - MARCH 13:  Head Coach Larry Eustachy of the Colorado State Rams calls to his team during a semifinal game of the Mountain West Conference basketball tournament against the San Diego State Aztecs at the Thomas & Mack Center on March 13, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada.  (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
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FORT COLLINS, Colo. (AP) Colorado State extended basketball coach Larry Eustachy’s contract Thursday through the 2020-21 season, adding a year to his existing deal.

Eustachy enters the season 11 wins away from 500 for his Division I career.

The 60-year-old Eustachy took over at Colorado State in 2012. He’s 87-48 with the Rams, including an NCAA Tournament appearance during his first season in charge.

Athletic director Joe Parker says he’s “excited about what the future holds for this program over the remainder of his coaching time here.”

As part of his agreement, Eustachy has bonuses for winning 20 games ($40,000), taking the Mountain West Conference championship ($100,000) and earning an NCAA Tournament bid ($200,000).

He’s led five programs to 24-plus-win seasons: CSU, Southern Miss, Iowa State, Utah State and Idaho.

Oregon State’s Tres Tinkle cleared for practice

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA - MARCH 18:  Tres Tinkle #3 of the Oregon State Beavers reacts late in the second half from the bench in the second half against the Virginia Commonwealth Rams in the first round of the 2016 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Chesapeake Energy Arena on March 18, 2016 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
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Oregon State may have surprised many last season when the Beavers reached the program’s first NCAA Tournament in more than a quarter of a century.

Wayne Tinkle’s club will attempt to replicate that success this season, however, it will be without the services of Gary Payton II. On Thursday, Tinkle received good news regarding his son, and team’s top returning scorer, Tres.

The 6-foot-8 sophomore forward has been cleared to return to all basketball activities on Thursday, according to Danny Moran of The Oregonian. Tres Tinkle has been recovering from a surgery in April to fix a broken bone in his right foot.

The injury, suffered in March, forced Tinkle to miss the final five games of the season, including a first-round loss to VCU in the 2016 NCAA Tournament.

Tinkle averaged 13.1 points and 5.4 assists per game in his first season in Corvallis. He’ll headline a young roster, accompanied by fellow sophomore, Stephen Thompson Jr., who also ended his first collegiate season averaging double figures. Four-star recruit JaQuori McLaughlin will assume the point guard duties left behind by Payton II. However, it’ll be difficult for anyone, especially a freshman, to replicate the stats Payton II produced, and I’m not talking about points. Payton II, at 6-foot-3, recorded team-highs in rebounds (7.8), assists (5.0) and steals (2.5) per game.

The Beavers may have made the jump into the NCAA Tournament picture a year or two earlier than expected. Regardless, a healthy Tinkle keeps them competitive in the Pac-12 this season, especially when you factor in that several teams, like Oregon State, have their own questions to address.

Oregon State opens the season on Nov. 11 against Prairie View A&M.

Southern Conference Preview: Chattanooga and East Tennessee State face off

Chattanooga head coach Matt McCall directs his team during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Iowa State, Monday, Nov. 23, 2015, in Ames, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall
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Beginning in September and running up through November 11th, the first day of the regular season, College Basketball Talk will be unveiling the 2016-2017 college hoops preview package.

Today, we are previewing the Southern Conference.

The rivalry between Chattanooga and East Tennessee State should be in full force this season as the two intra-state enemies should once again find themselves sitting atop the SoCon standings.

Chattanooga has to be considered the favorites entering the season. The Mocs went 29-6 last season. They won at Georgia, at Illinois and at Dayton. They won the SoCon regular season title at 15-3. They won the SoCon tournament title, beating ETSU in the process. They not only return four starters from last year’s team – including Tre’ McLean and Justin Tuoyo, who were all-league players last year – as well as Casey Jones, who was the 2015 SoCon Player of the Year and the 2016 Preseason SoCon Player of the Year before a dislocated ankle ended his season in December.

Think about that for a second. The Mocs did their majority of their damage last season without the guy the coaches thought would be the best player in the conference. And now he’s back, along with basically everyone else. Matt McCall will likely start his coaching career with two straight league titles.

But Steve Forbes and East Tennessee State won’t roll over easily, you can be sure of that. It wasn’t the least bit surprising that he was able to churn out a 24-12 season and a second-place finish in the league in his first year as head coach, mainly because he was able to stock the roster with high-major talent. This year, he adds former Indiana big man Hanner Mosquera-Perea and former Wichita State big man Tevin Glass to another former Hoosier, 7-footer Peter Jurkin. Throw in the return of all-SoCon guard T.J. Cromer and the addition of a handful of JuCon guards, including two JuCo all-americans, and the Bucs will be loaded as well.

Furman lost league Player of the Year Stephen Croome, but the Palladins return four starters from a team that won 11 league games. Niko Medved’s team should be in the mix to finish top four. Mercer lost a trio of starters from a team that finished 8-10 and dealt with the murder of a player in the middle of the season. It isn’t wise to bet against Bob Hoffman, especially when he adds the kind of JuCo talent he’s bringing in this year, but the death of a teammate is not easy to overcome.

Mike Young is one of the best coaches at the mid-major level, but after consecutive years of losing strong senior classes, it’s caught up to hi at Wofford. Fletcher MaGee is the Terrier to keep an eye on. Wes Miller has continually lost talented transfers, but this seems to be the year where UNC Greensboro has some stability. They bring back four starters from a team that won 10 games in the league.

Samford is the team to keep an eye on in the league. Christen Cunningham returns to provide a veteran scoring presence while Scott Padgett adds quite a bit of high-major talent: three high-major transfers will be eligible to play this year. Throw in a talented freshman class, and the Bulldogs have some potential.

Western Carolina graduated a four-man senior class that averaged a combined 52 points last season. The Citadel scores a ton of points but allowed an average of 92.6 points per game last season. Butler put 144 points on them. VMI struggled to adjust to new head coach Dan Earl, who replaced Duggar Baucom (who took over at The Citadel), but Q.J. Peterson might be the best scorer in the league.

MORE: 2016-17 Season Preview Coverage | Conference Previews | Preview Schedule



Chattanooga has three players on their roster capable of winning the SoCon Player of the Year award. So assuming they cancel each other out, we’re going to go with Cromer, who should be the best player on an ETSU team that can push for the SoCon title.


  • Justin Tuoyo, Chattanooga: He’s the best defensive presence around the rim in the league.
  • Casey Jones, Chattanooga: The 2015 SoCon Player of the Year. Is he healthy?
  • Tre’ McClean, Chattanooga: He was the best player for the Mocs last season.
  • Q.J. Peterson, VMI: VMI should be better. Peterson will probably still average 20 point.s


1. Chattanooga
2. East Tennessee State
3. UNC Greensboro
4. Mercer
5. Samford
6. Furman
7. Wofford
8. VMI
9. Western Carolina
10. The Citadel