Pregame Shootaround 2.12.13: Two massive rivalry games

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Game of the Night: No. 4 Michigan at No. 8 Michigan State (9:00 p.m. ET, ESPN)

It’s just another day in the Big Ten, as Michigan and Michigan State square off in an in-state rivalry that just so happens to be between two top ten teams looking win the league’s regular season title. The way the standings currently breakdown, the Wolverines are a game in back of the Spartans, who are tied with Indiana for first place. A win tonight would put Tom Izzo’s club in a great position to win the title, as the Hoosiers have a number of tough road games left on the schedule.

Michigan will have their hands full tonight trying to avoid falling two games out of first place. The key matchup for them is going to be at the power forward spot. Michigan plays small, using Glenn Robinson III — a natural small forward — there while the Spartans are one of the biggest teams in the country. Adreian Payne will likely draw the matchup with GR3. Can Michigan exploit Payne’s perimeter deficiencies defensively, or will his size be too much for the Wolverines to overcome?

The Other Game of the Night: No. 25 Kentucky at No. 7 Florida (7:00 p.m. ET, ESPN)

Here’s the matchup everyone’s been waiting for in the SEC. Kentucky, who has struggled in stretches this season, has found a rhythm playing against come of the SEC’s bottom-feeders, climbing their way back into the top 25 and the race for the SEC regular season title. That won’t be an easy thing to accomplish with a trip to the O-Dome in Gainesville standing in front of them. It wasn’t that long ago that people were talking about Florida like they were the best team in the country, and one ugly performance at Arkansas is an easy way to forget just how good this team has been this season.

The x-factor here: Will Yeguete’s injury. He was such a key component to Florida’s press, and that press would have been a major factor in Tuesday’s game with Kentucky’s back court question marks. Can the Wildcats take advantage? A win would draw them into a tie with the Gators for first in the SEC.

Mid-Major matchup of the night: Boston U. at Vermont (7:00 p.m. ET, ESPN3)

This will be the last time that two of the most storied programs in the America East history square off as league rivals, as BU will be heading for the Patriot League after this season.

Five Things to Watch For

1) If there is any team in the country that cannot afford a bad loss right now, it’s Virginia. They already have one of the most difficult resumes to project, losing to rival Virginia Tech at home would be disastrous. (7:00 p.m. ET, ESPN2)

2) Indiana State has had some trouble on the road this season, and Missouri State has done a fine job of playing spoiler in the MVC. The Sycamores are in a good position to in the Missouri Valley and earn an at-large bid. They cannot go risking that with a loss in Springfield. (8:00 p.m. ET, ESPN3)

3) Alabama has one of this season’s biggest scheduling quirks — they play nine straight SEC games against teams ranked above 100 in the RPI. I guess their are some major conference teams getting a taste of the mid-major lifestyle this season. Georgia’s no pushover, however. Kentavious Caldwell-Pope is playing some of the best basketball of his career and the Bulldogs have won five straight. (9:00 p.m. ET, ESPNU)

4) Set0n Hall and Rutgers square off in the Big East’s intra-state rivalry that no one seems to care about. (7:00 p.m. ET, ESPN2)

5) Cincinnati looks to end their losing skid by knocking off a pesky Villanova team at home. (8:00 p.m. ET, ESPN3)

Top 25

No. 4 Michigan at No. 8 Michigan State (9:00 p.m. ET, ESPN)

No. 25 Kentucky at No. 7 Florida (7:00 p.m. ET, ESPN)

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

NCAA: Former USF assistant provided extra benefits, lied to NCAA investigators

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The NCAA has alleged that former South Florida assistant coach Oliver Antigua provided roughly $500 in impermissible benefits and initially lied to NCAA investigators about it, according to the Tampa Bay Times, who obtained the NCAA’s summary disposition report.

Oliver Antigua is the younger brother of Orlando Antigua, who was the head coach at USF until he was fired in January. Now an assistant on Brad Underwood’s staff at Oklahoma State, Orlando was not alleged to have committed an NCAA violation in the report.

Oliver is alleged to have provided the extra benefits to two student-athletes while they were being tutored by the sister-in-law of Gerald Gillion, a special assistant to Orlando who resigned last fall, four months after Oliver did. USF has already self-imposed a $5,000 and reduced their scholarships from 13 to 12, according to the report.

“The University of South Florida and the NCAA continue to work together to resolve the inquiry into violations of NCAA bylaws and university standards by a USF intercollegiate athletic program,” according to a statement released by the school. “USF anticipates having a final resolution with the NCAA sometime this fall. Until the process concludes and the matter is fully resolved, USF cannot provide further comment.”

Villanova lands four-star 2018 guard

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Villanova added its first recruit in the Class of 2018 on Wednesday night.

Jay Wright and his staff landed a verbal commitment from Paul VI Catholic High School’s Brandon Slater, a four-star guard by Rivals as the No. 42 overall prospect in the rising senior class.

The 6-foot-5 Slater announced his decision via Twitter.

Slater, according to Jeff Borzello of ESPN, picked the Wildcats over Maryland, Miami, South Carolina, and Virginia.

He is currently playing the Nike EYBL with Team Takeover, the same grassroots program that produced current Villanova guard Phil Booth.

Comic-Con forces Providence to play at Alumni Hall for home opener

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Providence will play its first game at Alumni Hall, the on-campus facility, for the first time in 35 years this fall.

The Friars unveiled their 2017-18 non-conference schedule on Thursday afternoon. The team’s home opener will play either Houston Baptist or Belmont in Mullaney Gym inside Alumni Hall.

According to Kevin McNamara of the Providence Journal, the reason for that is a schedule conflict at Providence’s home arena, the Dunkin’ Donuts Center, in downtown Providence. A Comic-Con convention is scheduled Nov. 10-12. As McNamara notes, it’s a busy part of the season for The Dunk. The arena also is home to the Providence Bruins, the American Hockey League affiliate of the Boston Bruins, and by mid-November, their season is in full swing.

The Friars haven’t played at Alumni Hall since 1972, the same year the Dunkin’ Donuts Center was opened. In the three decades since Providence last played a regular season game there, the facility has gone under necessary renovations, as you could imagine. Even with added seats, Mullaney Gym can host a maximum of 1,549. That’s a fraction of what The Dunk’s capacity of 12,400.

Providence will return to its downtown home on Nov. 13, hosting Minnesota as part of the Gavitt Games. The Golden Gophers will likely be a top-20 team to open the season. The Friars, who bring back every notable player from last year’s NCAA Tournament team, is a fringe top-25 team.

Jalen Coleman-Lands to transfer out of Illinois

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The already-thin Illinois roster got thinner on Thursday afternoon.

Evan Daniels of Scout.com reported that sophomore guard Jalen Coleman-Lands has requested and received his release from the program. He will have to sit out next season but will have two years of eligibility remaining.

Coleman-Lands was a top-40 recruit in the Class of 2015, according to Rivals. He becomes the second player from that recruiting class this month to exit the school. Reserve guard D.J. Williams elected to transfer on May 8. With Jeremiah Tilmon and Javon Pickett, two incoming recruits, both previously reopened their recruitments following John Groce’s firing.

Even with the addition of Wright State graduate transfer Mark Alstork, who officially joined the Fighting Illini on Wednesday, Illinois is left with only nine scholarship players as of right now.

Coleman-Lands’ production dipped from his freshman campaign, ending the 2016-17 season averaging 8.0 points and 2.3 rebounds per game, shooting 38 percent from three.

One destination that will likely be rumored will be nearby DePaul. Coleman-Lands played for new DePaul assistant coach Shane Heirman at prep school powerhouse La Lumiere School. Heriman quickly tapped into that prep pipeline, helping secure a commitment from La Lumiere from five-star 2019 point guard Tyger Campbell earlier this month.

Coleman-Lands had taken official visits to Notre Dame and UNLV before committing to the Illini in September 2014.

North Carolina releases response to latest NCAA Notice of Allegations

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North Carolina is still trying to convince the NCAA that their investigation into the paper classes given by the university’s African-American Studies Department is not, in fact, an NCAA matter.

On Thursday afternoon, the University released their response to the NCAA’s third iteration of the Notice of Allegations, and the core argument in that response is that the school’s “inadequate academic oversight” does not fall under the jurisdiction of the NCAA’s bylaws. In other words, North Carolina is arguing that a rogue professor creating fake classes is not an NCAA issue. It’s a school issue.

What’s more, North Carolina is also arguing that athletes taking these classes should not be classified as an extra benefit because they were available to the entire student body.

“No special arrangements were made for student-athletes in violation of NCAA extra-benefit legislation,” the response reads. “Student-athletes were not treated differently than other students who took the Courses.”

“The public narrative for the last six years, popularized by media accounts, is that Department of Athletics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill took advantage of ‘fake classes’ in the Department of African and African-American Studies to keep student-athletes eligible. That narrative is wrong and contradicted by the facts in the record.”

The NCAA’s allegations center around the idea that UNC’s athletes, most notably members of the football and men’s and women’s basketball teams, were guided to the fake classes within that department in order to keep their GPAs high enough to remain eligible. The classes in question had a disproportionate percentage of athletes.

A hearing in front of the Committee on Infractions is expected to take place at some point this summer.