Indiana v Illinois

Late Night Snacks: No. 1 Indiana falls and eight overtime games on Thursday


Game of the Night: Marist 105, Iona 104 (2OT)

On a night that featured eight games that went to overtime this thriller in New Rochelle took the cake. A Chavaughn Lewis 65-footer as time expired in the first overtime tied the game, with Marist winning by a point when Lewis blocked a Sean Armand shot attempt at the end of the second overtime. Adam Kemp led the way for Marist with 29 points, 16 rebounds and seven blocked shots, and Lamont Jones scored 37 off the bench to pace the Gaels. Iona allowed an opportunity to close the gap at the top of the MAAC slip away, as first-place Niagara lost at Rider.

Important Outcomes 

1. Illinois 74, No. 1 Indiana 72 

This was a win the Fighting Illini, who entered Thursday with a 2-7 record in Big Ten play, needed for their NCAA tournament resume. A Tyler Griffey layup as time expired gave Illinois the win in a game they trailed by as many as 13 in the second half. Indiana still has yet to beat an NCAA tournament-worthy team on the road, and the lack of such a victory could get them in trouble when it comes to landing in the Midwest Region on Selection Sunday.

2. No. 4 Duke 98, N.C. State 85 

In the first of two games the Blue Devils will play against teams whose fans stormed the court after beating Duke, Mike Krzyzewski’s team put together its best half of offense this season. Duke scored 58 first-half points, then held on as Richard Howell (23 points, nine rebounds) attempted to come back in the second half. But Howell fouling out on a flagrant 1 with 8:54 remaining essentially shut the door on the Wolfpack. Mason Plumlee led the Blue Devils with 30 points and nine rebounds, and both Seth Curry (26 points) and Quinn Cook (21) surpassed the 20-point mark as well.

3. Colorado 48, No. 19 Oregon 47 

Illinois wasn’t the only team to pick up a needed resume-building victory. Colorado led just once all night in Eugene: on an Andre Roberson layup with 23 seconds remaining. But all that matters for the Buffaloes is that they were able to get the win, which drops Oregon to 1-3 without point guard Dominic Artis and leaves Arizona alone atop the Pac-12. Roberson (ten points, 13 rebounds) was the lone Colorado player to reach double figures, and E.J. Singler and Carlos Emory scored 14 apiece to lead Oregon.

Other Notable Outcomes 

1. Murray State 79, Belmont 74 

Belmont may still have the best record in the OVC but the Racers made sure that it was understood who the defending champions are. Isaiah Canaan led all scorers with 26 points and hit the three-pointer that gave Murray State the lead for good with 35 seconds to go. Ian Clark led Belmont with 22 points, but the Bruins’ comeback from 16 down in the second half fell short.

2. San Diego 74, BYU 68 

The Cougars had the most damaging loss of the night when it comes to the NCAA tournament, falling by six at San Diego. Tyler Haws (27 points) and Brandon Davies (20) combined to shoot 18-of-31 from the field, but their teammates shot 8-of-31. Johnny Dee scored 19 to lead the victorious Toreros.

3. Texas A&M 70, No. 21 Missouri 68

The Tigers dropped to 0-5 in true road games, losing in College Station on a Fabyon Harris three-pointer with 12 seconds remaining. Harris led the Aggies with 17 points while Missouri once again struggled with turnovers. The Tigers turned the ball over 16 times, which resulted in 22 points for Texas A&M.


1. G Nate Wolters (South Dakota State) 

Wolters went off on Thursday, scoring 53 points on 17-of-28 shooting to lead the Jackrabbits past Fort Wayne, 80-74. Wolters also grabbed four rebounds and dished out three assists. On Saturday Wolters and the Jackrabbits take on an Oakland team led by Travis Bader, who scored 47 (the previous high in college basketball this season) in a win over IUPUI on January 24.

2. F Jamal Olasewere (LIU Brooklyn) 

Olasewere shot 12-of-13 from the field in the Blackbirds’ 81-75 win at Central Connecticut State, scoring 25 points and grabbing 14 rebounds.

3. C Adam Kemp (Marist) 

29 points, 16 rebounds and seven blocked shots in the Red Foxes’ 105-104 double overtime win at Iona.


1. Central Arkansas

The Bears had a rough night offensively, shooting 31.3% from the field and turning the ball over 20 times in their 72-36 loss at Stephen F. Austin.

2. F Milton Jennings and F Devin Booker (Clemson) 

These two controlled the first meeting between the Tigers and Virginia, combining for 36 points and 20 rebounds. To say the least that didn’t happen tonight as they combined for nine points and 12 rebounds in a 78-41 loss in Charlottesville.

3. Virginia Tech players not named Cadarian Raines or Erick Green

While Raines (14 points, five rebounds and five blocked shots) and Green (29 points) combined to score 43 points, their teammates accounted for just 12 points on 5-of-29 shooting in a 60-55 loss to Maryland.

Top 25 Scores

Illinois 74, No. 1 Indiana 72

No. 4 Duke 98, N.C. State 85

No. 6 Gonzaga 82, Pepperdine 56

Colorado 48, No. 19 Oregon 47

Texas A&M 70, No. 21 Missouri 68

Raphielle also writes for the NBE Basketball Report and can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej

Guy V. Lewis, coach of Phi Slama Jama teams, dies at 93

Guy Lewis
Associated Press
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HOUSTON (AP) Former University of Houston men’s basketball coach Guy V. Lewis, best known for leading the Phi Slama Jama teams of the 1980s, has died. He was 93.

He died at a retirement facility in Kyle, Texas, on Thanksgiving morning surrounded by family, the school said Thursday.

Lewis coached the Cougars for 30 years. He guided Houston to back-to-back NCAA title games in 1983 and ’84 but never won the national championship, losing to N.C. State in the 1983 final on Lorenzo Charles’ last-second shot, one of the NCAA Tournament’s greatest upsets and most memorable plays.

“It feels awful,” Lewis said after that game. “I’ve never lost a game that didn’t feel that way, but this one was terrible.”

Lewis, who helped lead the integration of college basketball in the South by recruiting Elvin Hayes and Don Chaney to Houston, was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013.

Known for plaid jackets and wringing his hands with a red polka-dot towel during games, Lewis compiled a 592-279 record at Houston, guiding the Cougars to 27 consecutive winning seasons from 1959-85. He was honored as the national coach of the year twice (1968 and `83) and led Houston to 14 NCAA Tournaments and five Final Fours.

Lewis had mostly avoided the spotlight since retiring in 1986. He suffered a stroke in February 2002 and had used a wheelchair in recent years.

He was known for putting together the “Game of the Century” at the Astrodome in 1968 between Houston and UCLA. It was the first regular-season game to be broadcast on national television. Houston defeated the Bruins in front of a crowd of more than 52,000, which, at that time, was the largest ever to watch an indoor basketball game.

Lewis attended the introductory news conference in December 2007 for Kevin Sumlin, the first black football coach in Houston history. It was a symbolic, significant appearance because Lewis signed Houston’s first two black basketball players and some of the first in the region in Hayes and Chaney in 1964, when programs were just starting to integrate.

Hayes and Chaney led the Cougars to the program’s first Final Four in 1967 but lost to Lew Alcindor’s UCLA team in the semifinal game.

“Basketball in the state of Texas and throughout the South is all due to coach Guy V. Lewis,” Hayes said in 2013. “He put everything on the line to step out and integrate his program. Not only that, he had vision to say: `Hey, we can play a game in the Houston Astrodome.’ Not only that, he just was such a motivator and such an innovator that created so many doors for the game of basketball to grow.”

Along with Hayes, Lewis also coached fellow All-Americans Hakeem Olajuwon and Clyde Drexler. The three were included on the NBA’s Top 50 greatest players list in 1996. Lewis and North Carolina’s Dean Smith were the only men to coach three players from that list while they were in college.

Players and CBS announcer Jim Nantz lobbied for years for Lewis to get into the Naismith Hall of Fame. When he finally received the honor in 2013 he made a rare public appearance. It was difficult for him to convey his thoughts in words in his later years because of aphasia from his strokes, so his daughter spoke on his behalf at the event to celebrate his induction.

“It’s pure joy and we’re not even upset that it took so long. … Dad is used to winning in overtime,” Sherry Lewis said.

Lewis announced his retirement during the 1985-86 season, and the Cougars finished 14-14, his first non-winning season since 1958-59.

Guy Vernon Lewis II was born in Arp, a town of fewer than 1,000 residents in northeast Texas. He became a flight instructor for the U.S. Army during World War II and enrolled at the University of Houston in 1946.

He joined the basketball team, averaged 21.1 points and led the Cougars to the Lone Star Conference championship. By the early 1950s, he was working as an assistant coach under Alden Pasche and took over when Pasche retired in 1956.

Funeral services are pending.

AP Sports Writer Chris Duncan contributed to this story.

Syracuse upsets No. 18 UConn as Tyler Lydon stars again

St Bonaventure Syracuse Basketball
AP Photo/Heather Ainsworth
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Michael Gbinije and Trevor Cooney combined for 34 points as Syracuse overcame an early 10-point deficit to knock off No. 18 UConn in the semifinals of the Battle 4 Atlantis, 79-76.

The talking point at the end of this game is probably going to end up being UConn’s decision not to foul Syracuse with 36 seconds left on the clock. Trevor Cooney dribbled out the clock and, with six seconds left, missed a 35-foot prayer, the offensive rebound getting corralled by Tyler Roberson, sealing the win.

But that’s not the real story here.

That would be Tyler Lydon, who suddenly looks like he may end up being the difference maker for this Syracuse team.

If you don’t know the name, I don’t blame you. Lydon was a low-end top 100 recruit that had been committed to the Orange for a long time. He’s not exactly a game-changing prospect, but he’s a perfect fit for Syracuse. At 6-foot-9, Lydon has the length to be a shot-blocker in the middle of the 2-3 zone — he entered Thursday averaging 3.3 blocks — but his biggest skill is his ability to shoot the ball from beyond the arc. When he plays the middle of that zone, when he is essentially the five for the Orange, they become incredibly difficult to matchup with defensively.

The question is whether or not he can consistently be that guy on the defensive end of the floor. Against UConn, Lydon had 16 points and 12 boards. Against Charlotte, he finished with 18 points, eight boards and six blocks. But neither the Huskies nor the 49ers have a big front line that crashes the offensive glass.

Lydon is great at using his length to make shots in the lane difficult, but at (a generous) 205 pounds, he may run into trouble against bigger, stronger front court players.

The perfect test?

Texas A&M, who the Orange will play in the title game on Friday.