If Ohio State-Michigan taught us anything, it’s that college hoops is still great

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There are plenty of topics to focus a post on coming out of that thrilling, 76-74 overtime victory that No. 3 Michigan earned over No. 10 Ohio State on Tuesday night.

Tim Hardaway Jr., who has spent his career at Michigan trying to prove himself a consistent perimeter shooter, draining five of his six threes in the second half to keep Ohio State from pulling away.

LaQuinton Ross (16 points after never scoring more than eight in a Big Ten game in his career) and Amir Williams both playing the game of their lives, helping Ohio State build a seven-point second half lead despite a mediocre (by his standards) performance from Deshaun Thomas.

John Beilein’s decision to use Burke as a facilitator and, for a long stretch in the second half, as a decoy on the offensive end of the floor thanks to Aaron Craft’s ability to suffocate a ball-handler.

Thad Matta’s questionable play-calling down the stretch. Thomas didn’t get a touch on the offensive end of the floor in overtime while Ross didn’t get off the bench.

The emergence of Mitch McGary for John Beilein.

Should Aaron Craft have drawn a foul on his final, coast-to-coast layup attempt? (Probably.)

But all that? It’s besides the point here.

This was, simply put, a fantastic basketball game between two very good teams playing their best basketball in a jam-packed, raucous arena on national television on a Tuesday night. As good as it gets. And it came immediately after a mediocre Arkansas team knocked off the No. 2 team in the country — No. 1 if you listened to me — in dominating Florida. It came just three days after Indiana and Michigan capped another terrific Saturday of hoops with what we thought was the best game of the year. Think about that. It only took 72 hours for the season’s best game to date to become the second best game involving Michigan this season.

And this is a sport that’s in shambles? This is the sport that everyone is trying to fix?

We’re going to get a game like this on what will seem like a nightly basis in the Big Ten. That’s what happens when half of a 12 team league is in the top 25 and four of those teams are in the top ten. (To prove a point, tomorrow, No. 18 Minnesota visits No. 12 Michigan State.)

And that’s just the start of it.

The Mountain West is the nation’s toughest conference, with five of the nine league members battling for a tournament spot. The Atlantic 10 may be the most difficult to figure out, as everyone seems to be within a game or two of first place. The Big East has seven teams in the top 25 and half the league within a game of first. Miami’s surge to relevance is one of college basketball’s best storylines, while the Big 12 has suddenly turned into a race with the way Kansas has struggled offensively in league play.

I could go on, but I won’t.

If you’ve made it this far, and you’re still agreeing with me while nodding along and saying, “preaching to the choir, Rob”, than my job here is done. If you’re not, than you haven’t made it this far.

Which is perfectly fine.

Because if you truly believe college basketball is in shambles, than you’re simply not watching enough games.

You’re not trying hard enough.

So go ahead and kill the time over the next six weeks watching the NBA, because they’re putting in just as much effort as you are.

If you can’t find a way to enjoy what we witnessed tonight — and what we witnessed on Saturday and, seemingly, countless times this season — than we don’t want you here.

See yourself out.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Arizona lands Pitt transfer forward Ryan Luther

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Arizona landed a key addition for its frontcourt on Wednesday as Pitt transfer forward Ryan Luther pledged to the Wildcats.

The 6-foot-9 Luther is expected to receive a hardship waiver that would give him immediate eligibility, a source confirmed to NBCSports.com, as Arizona gets some much-needed help up front.

Playing in 10 games last season before a stress reaction in his right foot ended the season, Luther averaged 12.7 points and 10.1 rebounds per game for the Panthers. In his final game of the season, Luther went for 13 points and 12 rebounds in a Pitt loss to West Virginia. Luther shot 45 percent from the field and is a noted perimeter threat as he was 38 percent from behind the three-point line.

Luther hasn’t logged heavy minutes as a contributor through a full season. Mostly a role player at Pitt until last season, Luther was the team’s most productive player when he was on the floor. But that production also didn’t come during ACC play and through the course of a full season.

Thankfully at a program like Arizona, Luther should have a bit more help around him. He could be a nice addition to the Wildcats, particularly if he rebounds and spaces the floor in the frontcourt as he did at Pitt. Arizona needed someone like Luther to provide more stability after losing players like Deandre Ayton and Dusan Ristic.

In the last few weeks, Arizona has rebounded nicely to land three commitments for next season — including freshmen Devonaire Doutrive and Omar Thielemans. The group isn’t as heralded as some past Arizona recruiting efforts. Given where the Wildcats were in recruiting a few weeks ago, however, this isn’t a bad turnaround.

TCU extends Jamie Dixon’s contract by two more years

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TCU has given head coach Jamie Dixon a two-year contract extension through the 2023-24 season, according to a release from the school.

Dixon took the Horned Frogs to the NCAA tournament for the first time in 20 years this season as he’s done a great job of turning around his alma mater. The release also notes that TCU had the highest average attendance in program history this season. Fans are also taking notice of a revitalized team.

With back-to-back 20-win seasons and postseason appearances, Dixon and TCU have a lot of positive momentum going on right now. The two-year extension for Dixon should help a bit in recruiting when it comes to overall stability, as well, as he’s been able to attract some quality talent so far.

Report: Kevin Ollie claims UConn violated rights with firing

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Fired former UConn head coach Kevin Ollie is claiming that the school violated his constitutional rights during his departure.

Ollie sent a letter to UConn school president Susan Herbst which was obtained by ESPN’s Myron Medcalf in a report released on Wednesday. Ollie’s lawyers are claiming the school proceeded with his firing before giving Ollie a proper chance to contest his termination — which was guaranteed in his contract and also the collective bargaining agreement with the University of Connecticut’s branch of the American Association of University Professors. Ollie was fired, with cause, in late March as the school mentioned an NCAA inquiry as the reason why. According to Medcalf’s report, the NCAA has not sent a notice of allegations to the school.

Ollie’s union membership includes thousands of faculty members around the country as the collective bargaining agreement demands a hearing process before any employee can be terminated for allegations of serious misconduct. Ollie claims he didn’t receive a letter he was supposed to get to begin the termination process.

“From our review of the facts and circumstances relating to Coach Ollie’s employment status, it is apparent that the University of Connecticut has already violated [Coach Ollie’s] rights under the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution by subverting Coach Ollie’s opportunity to respond to charges and evidence in a meaningful way in advance of the decision to terminate his employment,” said the letter dated April 3.

“The public record, action taken, and authorized communications by representatives of the University of Connecticut, demonstrate that the decision to terminate Coach Ollie has already been made and therefore the University of Connecticut has effectively negated Coach Ollie’s property right protected by the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.”

This letter to UConn likely begins a long legal battle to try to get an eight-figure payout back as Ollie is going to do everything he can to clear his name.

South Carolina’s Brian Bowen, still ineligible, to declare for draft

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Former Louisville forward and current South Carolina Gamecock Brian Bowen will declare for the NBA draft without signing with an agent as a safety measure in case the NCAA does not clear him to play in the 2018-19 season.

Bowen is the former top 25 prospect that was forced to leave the Louisville program after the FBI’s investigation into corruption in college hoops turned up evidence that his family had accepted the first payment of what was supposed to be a $100,000 fee to get him to be a Cardinal.

That investigation was ultimately what got Rick Pitino fired.

“I just felt that it was the right decision,” Bowen told ESPN. “My goal is still to play college basketball, but I felt as though it makes sense to cover my bases.”

Bowen is in a tough spot right now.

On the one hand, he has already missed an entire season of college basketball and there is no guarantee that he will be cleared to play next season, if at all.

On the other hand, the fact that he has not played in a year and that he has not played against any collegiate level competition is one of the reasons that NBA front offices are going to be hesitant to draft him, and that’s not a good thing for a player that was considered a second round pick before he spent a year on the sidelines.

North Carolina’s Cam Johnson undergoes hip surgery

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For the second time in the last six months, North Carolina wing Cam Johnson has undergone the knife.

On Wednesday, North Carolina announced that Johnson underwent an arthroscopic procedure on his hip on Monday, and that he is expected to make a full recovery and return to school in time for the start of the 2018-19 season.

The 6-foot-9 Johnson was UNC’s third-leading scorer a season ago, averaging 12.4 points while shooting 34.1 percent from three. He only played 26 games, however, after missing time due to a surgery to fix a torn meniscus.