Is college basketball actually in shambles?


It seems like this season, there has been a lot more talk about what is wrong with college basketball and how we can fix the sport to make it more popular and mainstream. That talk went viral on Monday, thanks to these comments from the Austin American-Statesmen:

Count Plonsky and myself among those who earnestly wish the start of the college basketball season would be pushed back until early December to give that sport a more fair shake in exposure as it tries in vain to compete with college football and the NFL for the public’s consciousness. “We have to start sliding the season back until football calms down,” Plonsky said. Added Dodds, concerning the one-and-done superstars, “The sport of basketball is in shambles.”

Sliding the season back won’t work. The NFL season doesn’t end until the beginning of February, and with the BCS playoffs coming, college football might be reaching their tentacles further into the New Year as well. By pushing the season back, March Madness will only be forced to share the spotlight with the start of baseball seasons and the NBA playoffs.

That’s not exactly the best way to promote the game.

The bottom-line is that college basketball is going to be a niche sport. Darren Rovell said in a recent interview with The Big Lead that the top five most popular sports are the NFL, College Football, the NBA, MLB and Nascar. He’s probably correct. Pro sports are always going to be more popular than college sports. Football dominates because there is one game played every week. Fans look forward to it all week, and those games usually happen on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. The same thing can be said for Nascar races.

College hoops as the potential to be better and more popular, but the two biggest issue the sport faces right now are out of its control. Realignment is butchering the local rivalries and traditional conference foes we’ve come to know and love. The Big East has been gutted by realignment, and the most historic programs in the best hoops conference in the country bolted. All that has been due to football’s impact on the college sports landscape.

The other problem is the one-and-done rule, which is the result of a rule implemented by the NBA. Having those kids on campus for one year is better than not having them at all, but it creates a problem: with the exception of the occasional Kevin Durant or Carmelo Anthony, freshmen, regardless of how talented they are, are generally not ready to step on campus and dominate. Just look at what’s happening with Kentucky and UCLA this season. They had loaded recruiting classes, and they’re probably not going to win their conference.

They’ll be a dangerous tournament team, but that’s because it took them four months to finally figure out how to play. If those kids spend two years on campus, the early season hoops will be better.

But they won’t be.

Which only drives home the point that college basketball cannot do away with March Madness.

How many sports can dominate the attention of every fan across the country for an entire month? College basketball does that. Every March, all eyes turn to college hoops as fans settle in to cheer for the bracket they filled out and, secondarily, their alma mater. That’s a key right there. March Madness brings in fans that are there to watch more than just their team’s game.

I don’t agree with Dodds that basketball is in shambles.

But I do believe the sport needs to be improved. To do that, the most talented players need to spend a longer period of time on campus, the overall level of play needs to be improved, and the games that occur throughout the month of December need to be more relevant.

More talent and better play in bigger games will equal more eyeballs.

Changing the one thing that college basketball does better than any other sport is not the answer.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Battle 4 Atlantis title proves Syracuse will be relevant this season

rad Horrigan/The Courant via AP
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Michael Gbinije scored 20 points and Trevor Cooney added 15 points and five assists as Syracuse left the Bahamas with a title, beating No. 25 Texas A&M 74-67 in the finals of the Battle 4 Atlantis.

I guess it’s time to start taking the Orange seriously.

There’s a lot to like about this group. Gbinije and Cooney are both fifth-year seniors that not only understand how to operate at the top of the 2-3 zone that Jim Boeheim runs, but they both have developed into versatile offensive weapons. Cooney was known as nothing more than a jump-shooter when he arrived up north, but he’s now averaging 3.5 assists on the season.

And Gbinije?

He has been one of the best players in the country through the first two weeks of the season. Through six games, he’s averaged 19.7 points, 4.2 assists, 3.0 boards and 2.8 steals while shooting 51.3 percent from beyond the arc.

Freshman Malachi Richardson, who had 16 points in the win over A&M, has scored double-figures in all six games this season while another freshman, Tyler Lydon, was against terrific on Friday, finishing with 13 points and eight boards. He’s now shooting 58.8 percent from beyond the arc this season.

And that’s where this team is going to do the majority of their damage this season.

Through six games, they’re shooting 41.1 percent from beyond the arc. In the three wins in the Bahamas, the Orange knocked were 34-for-73 from beyond the arc, a 46.5 percent clip. The question isn’t whether or not that rate can continue — four of the six players that saw action on Friday are dangerous three-point shooters while the other two, Tyler Roberson  and DaJuan Coleman, aren’t going to be shooting threes — but what happens on the nights where the threes aren’t going down.

There are going to be nights where they shoot 5-for-25 instead of 11-for-25. Will they have enough firepower then? Will their defense be good enough? Will guys like Roberson and Coleman be able to supply a scoring punch? Will Cooney, Gbinije and Richardson attack the paint instead of settling for jumpers?

Because at the very least, these three games in the Bahamas have proven that the Orange are going to be relevant this season, even in the loaded ACC. Whether that means they’re going to push for a top four finish or simply end the year as a tournament team remains to be seen, but this much is clear: Jim Boeheim has himself a squad Upstate.

No. 10 Gonzaga outlasts No. 18 UConn despite late offensive struggles

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No. 10 Gonzaga survived a furious rally from No. 18 UConn to win the third place game in the Battle 4 Atlantis, 73-70.

The Zags were up by as much as 21 points early in the second half, leading 48-27, but UConn slowly chipped away at the lead. Kyle Wiltjer led four players in double-figures with 17 points while Eric McClellan added 15 points, making a number of key plays in the second half when it looked like the Zags were in danger of giving away the lead.

As good as Gonzaga looked in the first 22 minutes of this game — and they looked really, really good — the second half exposed the concerns that many had with this group entering the season. Kevin Pangos and Gary Bell Jr., who both shot around 40 percent from beyond the arc and started for four years, graduated, meaning that Gonzaga’s point guard situation is, more or less, Josh Perkins.

Perkins was terrific in the second half of a loss to Texas A&M on Thursday. He played 17 foul-plagued minutes against UConn. When UConn’s defense ratcheted up during the second half, Gonzaga struggled finding a way to consistently get good shots on the offensive end. Part of that was due to ineffective point guard play and part of it was a result of not really having anyone on the offensive end that can create a look on their own. As skilled as Wiltjer is, his impact can be limited when pick-and-pop actions aren’t working and he’s getting doubled in the post.

Perkins is talented, but this is essentially his first season of college basketball; he was a medical redshirt last season after breaking his jaw last November. There are going to be ups-and-downs, and that’s problematic on a team where he is essentially the only point guard on the roster.

The good news?

Gonzaga beat a good UConn team on a day when their best players struggled in crunch-time. It was McClellan and Kyle Dranginis that made the big plays down the stretch, not the big names on the Gonzaga roster.