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Is college basketball actually in shambles?

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It seems like this season, there has been a lot more talk about what is wrong with college basketball and how we can fix the sport to make it more popular and mainstream. That talk went viral on Monday, thanks to these comments from the Austin American-Statesmen:

Count Plonsky and myself among those who earnestly wish the start of the college basketball season would be pushed back until early December to give that sport a more fair shake in exposure as it tries in vain to compete with college football and the NFL for the public’s consciousness. “We have to start sliding the season back until football calms down,” Plonsky said. Added Dodds, concerning the one-and-done superstars, “The sport of basketball is in shambles.”

Sliding the season back won’t work. The NFL season doesn’t end until the beginning of February, and with the BCS playoffs coming, college football might be reaching their tentacles further into the New Year as well. By pushing the season back, March Madness will only be forced to share the spotlight with the start of baseball seasons and the NBA playoffs.

That’s not exactly the best way to promote the game.

The bottom-line is that college basketball is going to be a niche sport. Darren Rovell said in a recent interview with The Big Lead that the top five most popular sports are the NFL, College Football, the NBA, MLB and Nascar. He’s probably correct. Pro sports are always going to be more popular than college sports. Football dominates because there is one game played every week. Fans look forward to it all week, and those games usually happen on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. The same thing can be said for Nascar races.

College hoops as the potential to be better and more popular, but the two biggest issue the sport faces right now are out of its control. Realignment is butchering the local rivalries and traditional conference foes we’ve come to know and love. The Big East has been gutted by realignment, and the most historic programs in the best hoops conference in the country bolted. All that has been due to football’s impact on the college sports landscape.

The other problem is the one-and-done rule, which is the result of a rule implemented by the NBA. Having those kids on campus for one year is better than not having them at all, but it creates a problem: with the exception of the occasional Kevin Durant or Carmelo Anthony, freshmen, regardless of how talented they are, are generally not ready to step on campus and dominate. Just look at what’s happening with Kentucky and UCLA this season. They had loaded recruiting classes, and they’re probably not going to win their conference.

They’ll be a dangerous tournament team, but that’s because it took them four months to finally figure out how to play. If those kids spend two years on campus, the early season hoops will be better.

But they won’t be.

Which only drives home the point that college basketball cannot do away with March Madness.

How many sports can dominate the attention of every fan across the country for an entire month? College basketball does that. Every March, all eyes turn to college hoops as fans settle in to cheer for the bracket they filled out and, secondarily, their alma mater. That’s a key right there. March Madness brings in fans that are there to watch more than just their team’s game.

I don’t agree with Dodds that basketball is in shambles.

But I do believe the sport needs to be improved. To do that, the most talented players need to spend a longer period of time on campus, the overall level of play needs to be improved, and the games that occur throughout the month of December need to be more relevant.

More talent and better play in bigger games will equal more eyeballs.

Changing the one thing that college basketball does better than any other sport is not the answer.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Rick Pitino: ‘We should be penalized … but not this team’

Rick Pitino
(AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
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One of the biggest storylines of Saturday’s college basketball schedule had everything to do with a team that no longer matters in the championship picture.

Less than 24 hours after being informed that the school would be imposing a postseason ban that will leave the Cardinals out of the ACC and NCAA tournaments, No. 19 Louisville tipped off against Boston College, and they did so without leading scorer Damion Lee, who is battling a knee issue.

How would the team respond to the decision — the despicable, shameful decision — that the university’s president made?

Well, it seems.

The Cardinals jumped out to a 19-2 lead in the first eight minutes and cruised to a 79-47 win over an overmatched Boston College team in the Yum! Center.

And head coach Rick Pitino, after the quote, said exactly what everyone is thinking.

“We should be penalized, no question about it,” he said. “But not this team. But the NCAA didn’t make that decision. We made that decision.”

He’s totally right. The school sacrificed the season — and the only shot that a pair of fifth-year seniors would get to play in the NCAA tournament — to protect the school, the brand and the bottom-line moving forward. Like I said earlier, it’s despicable.

But credit the Cardinals for responding.

Because they still have something on the line. They’re just a game out of first place in the ACC, and while an ACC regular season title isn’t a shot to play in the ACC or NCAA tournament, it’s still a banner that would probably mean more to Damion Lee and Trey Lewis than any league title has meant to a Louisville player before.

Oklahoma State without Jawun Evans, questionable moving forward

Oklahoma State guard Jawun Evans (1) goes up for a shot between Kansas forward Jamari Traylor (31) and forward Perry Ellis (34) in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Stillwater, Okla., Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016. Oklahoma State won 86-67. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
(AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
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Oklahoma State’s star point guard was not in the lineup on Saturday against No. 13 Iowa State.

Evans injured his shoulder in the Cowboys’ loss at Texas Tech on Wednesday and was ruled out of Saturday’s game.

According to the school, his official status moving forward is questionable. The Pokes are just 11-11 on the season and likely need to earn the Big 12’s at-large bid to get into the NCAA tournament. It makes sense to let him get healthy.

Evans was averaging 12.9 points, 4.9 assists and 4.4 boards this season, but he had been arguably the best point guard in the Big 12 during league play, averaging 15.6 points and 5.6 assists.