Pittsburgh v Louisville

Late Night Snacks: Louisville snaps the losing streak, Grambling stays winless

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A decent slate of games on Monday night. Three Top 25 teams, a full slate of SWAC and MEAC games and the premiere teams in the Big 12 and Big East pull out wins. Enjoy to briefing, it’s Late Night Snacks.

Game of the night

No. 13 Louisville 64, Pittsburgh 61 – The Cardinals hadn’t won since being ranked no. 1. Pittsburgh has been surprisingly good over the past few weeks. It was an ugly game, but the Panthers going 3-for-12 from the free throw line and Louisville hitting 13-of-17 from the same place turned out to be the difference.

Games of note

No. 2 Kansas 61, West Virginia 56 – In the first-ever meeting between the two schools, the Jayhawks got out to an early lead thanks to offensive struggles by the Mountaineers, which earned Aaric Murray an early benching from coach Bob Huggins. WVU mounted a late charge, but it wasn’t enough.

No. 25 Marquette 63, South Florida 50 – Well, this time, no one had to deal with any bats, so things were comfortable. Vander Blue had a huge night (see below) and Marquette cruised late to keep itself ranked for another day.

Mississippi Valley State 65, Grambling State 50 – This might be the Tigers best chance at a win all season, playing a two-win Delta Devils team. It just wasn’t to be. Grambling shot 42.9-percent, but turned the ball over 20 times.


Vander Blue, Marquette – It was one of those nights that Blue couldn’t miss. Blue was 13-for-20 from the field for 30 points in the Golden Eagles win. Let’s just say it…. YOU’RE MY BOY, BLUE!

Gorgui Dieng, Louisville – Finished with 14 points and 12 rebounds as the Cardinals got back into the win column. He also hit two free throws with less than a minute left to help seal the win at home.

Jeff Withey, Kansas – He had another solid night and has proven to be the most consistent player for the Jayhawks. The fifth-year senior finished with 15 points, seven rebounds and four blocks, including one that preserved a five-point lead late in the game.

Damien Lee, Drexel – There was no Franz Massanet magic on Monday night, with the Dragons falling to Delawar 66-64, but Lee poured in almost half their points with 30 in the loss.

Kevin Mays, Maryland-Eastern Shore – The Hawks lost at Bethune-Cookman 58-57, but Mays provided the silver lining for the one-win UMES with 20 points, 11 rebounds and four assists.


Toarlyn Fitzpatrick, South Florida – He averages 10.3 points per game, he scored three in the loss at Marquette. Got to do more than that to get a win in Milwaukee.

Stuffing the stat sheet

Devon Saddler, Kyle Anderson and Jarvis Threatt, Delaware – The trio did their part to wear out the stat guy in a close win, 66-64 over Drexel. They combined for 37 points, 19 rebounds and 16 assists for the Blue Hens.

One night of good basketball will give way to a better one tomorrow night. Have a good night, folks.

David Harten is the founder of The Backboard Chronicles. Follow him on Twitter at @David_Harten.

POSTERIZED: Wyoming’s Josh Adams takes flight

Josh Adams
Associated Press
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Not only is Wyoming senior guard Josh Adams the lone returning starter from a team that won the Mountain West tournament last season, but he’s also one of college basketball’s best dunkers. And if anyone may have forgotten about his jumping ability, Adams put it on display Saturday during the Cowboys’ win over Montana State.

After splitting two Montana State players at the top of the key Adams attacked the basket, dunking with two hands over a late-arriving help-side defender. If you’re going to rotate over, have to do it quicker than that.

Video credit: Wyoming Athletics

Defensive progress will determine No. 4 Iowa State’s ceiling

Monte Morris
Associated Press
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Even with the coaching change from Fred Hoiberg to Steve Prohm, No. 4 Iowa State remains one of the nation’s best offensive teams. Given their skills on that end of the floor many teams find it tough to go score for score with the Cyclones, and that’s what happened to Illinois in Iowa State’s 84-73 win in the Emerald Coast Classic title game.

Georges Niang scored 23 points and grabbed eight rebounds, with Monté Morris adding 20, nine rebounds and six assists and Abdel Nader 18 points as the Cyclones moved to 5-0 on the season. The three-pointers weren’t falling in the second half, as Iowa State shot 0-f0r-12, but they shot 19-for-24 inside of the arc to pull away from a team that lost big man Mike Thorne Jr. late in the first half to a left knee injury.

Illinois’ loss of size in the paint opened things up offensively for Iowa State, and the Cyclones took advantage. But where this group grabbed control of the game was on the defensive end of the floor, and that will be the key for a team with Big 12 and national title aspirations.

Nader took on the responsibility of defending Illinois’ Malcolm Hill (20 points) in the second half and did a solid job of keeping the junior wing in check, with that serving as the spark to a 12-2 run that put the game away. There’s no denying that the Cyclones can put points on the board; most of the talent from last season is back and the productivity on that end of the floor hasn’t changed as a result. Niang’s one of the nation’s best forwards, and both Morris (who now ranks among the country’s best point guards) and Nader have taken significant strides in their respective games.

Iowa State will add Deonte Burton in December, giving them another option to call upon. Front court depth is a bit of a concern, as Iowa State can ill afford to lose a Niang or Jameel McKay, but there’s enough on the roster to compensate for that and force mismatches in other areas.

But the biggest question for this group is how effective they can become at stringing together stops. Illinois certainly had its moments in both halves Saturday night, but Iowa State also showed during the game’s decisive stretch that they can step up defensively. The key now is to do so consistently, and if that occurs the Cyclones can be a threat both within the Big 12 and nationally.